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Tài liệu Module 1: Introduction to Exchange 2000 and the Web Storage System pdf








Contents
Overview 1
Introduction to Exchange 2000 2
Introduction to the Web Storage System 11
Developmental Features of the Web
Storage System 16
Lab A: Accessing and Viewing Data in the
Web Storage System 25
Managing Exchange 2000 32
Lab B: Creating a Public Folder, a Public
Store, and a Virtual Directory 38
Review 43

Module 1: Introduction

to Exchange 2000 and
the Web Storage
System


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Module 1: Introduction to Exchange 2000 and the Web Storage System iii


Instructor Notes
This module provides students with an introduction to Microsoft
®

Exchange 2000 Server and Microsoft Web Storage System, including the
features and functionality of each. The module discusses Web Storage System
support for application development including Internet technologies, Microsoft
application programming interfaces (APIs), Collaboration Data Objects (CDO),
Web forms, event programming, and workflow support. The module also
discusses the tools used to perform administrative tasks: Exchange System
Manager and the Active Directory

directory service Users and Computers.
The module discusses only the administrative tasks that are of interest to a
developer.
Module lecture content and learning objectives are reinforced by two hands-on
labs, Lab A, Accessing and Viewing Data in the Web Storage System, and
Lab B, Creating a Public Folder, a Public Store, and a Virtual Directory.
After completing this module, students will be able to:
!
Describe the main features of the three versions of Exchange 2000 and
describe the data structure of Exchange 2000.
!
Describe the features and functionality of Web Storage System in
Exchange 2000.
!
Describe the development features supported by Web Storage System,
including support of Internet protocols, APIs, CDO, Web forms, events
programming, and workflow.
!
Manage Exchange 2000 stores, storage groups, public folders, and virtual
servers by using Exchange System Manager and add mail-enabled users by
using Active Directory Users and Computers.

Materials and Preparation
This section provides the materials and preparation tasks that you need to teach
this module.
Required Materials
To teach this module, you need the following materials:
!
Microsoft PowerPoint
®
file 2019A_01.ppt
!
Module 1,

Introduction to Exchange 2000 and the Web Storage System



Preparation Tasks
To prepare for this module, you should:
!
Read all of the materials for this module.
!
Practice the demonstration
!
Complete the labs.

Presentation:
45 Minutes

Labs:
35 Minutes
iv Module 1: Introduction to Exchange 2000 and the Web Storage System


Demonstration
In the demonstration, you will create a new mail-enabled user by using Active
Directory Users and Groups.
1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then
click Active Directory Users and Computers.
2. Expand the domain node, and then select the Users directory.
3. Right-click the Users directory point to New and then select User.
4. Type in a first name, last name, and user logon name.
5. Click Next.
6. Leave all the password options blank and click Next.
7. Accept the default settings for the new users mailbox information. Explain
how the integration of Exchange 2000 and Microsoft Windows
®
2000
results in the availability of this option when creating new users.
8. Click Finish.

Module 1: Introduction to Exchange 2000 and the Web Storage System v


Module Strategy
Use the following strategy to present this module:
!
Introduction to Exchange 2000
Introduce Exchange 2000 and the Web Storage System. Discuss the data
structure of Exchange 2000. Define and discuss how Exchange 2000 stores
data by using stores, storage groups, and folder trees. Emphasize that every
folder tree is a store and, in turn, uses the Web Storage System to access
data in the store. Discuss how Active Directory integrates with Exchange
2000 and how all directory information is stored in Active Directory and not
Exchange 2000. Discuss the benefits of Active Directory integration. You
may need to spend additional time on this section if the students are not
familiar with Exchange.
!
Introduction to the Web Storage System
Define the Web Storage System and then define resources. Emphasize that
each item in the Web Storage System is addressable by using a URL. Define
schema, and introduce the Web Storage System default schema and explain
its functionality when programs are created. Mention that developers can
extend the default schema when building custom programs. Finally, discuss
the features that Web Storage System database brings to Exchange 2000.
!
Developmental Features of the Web Storage System
Briefly introduce the application development features of the Web Storage
System and Exchange 2000.
• Discuss the various Internet technologies and describe how developers
can use them to develop Web-enabled solutions by using the Web
Storage System and Exchange 2000.
• Explain how the Microsoft APIs, ActiveX
®
Data Objects (ADO), MAPI,
and Microsoft Win32
®
, offer access to Exchange 2000.
• Explain how CDO solutions save the developer time. Describe the new
features of CDO for Exchange 2000 Server. Introduce CDO for
Exchange Management and explain its functions.
• Introduce Web forms and explain the functionality that Web forms bring
to a Web application, and describe the tools that are used to build Web
forms.
• Introduce event-programming support. Emphasize that Exchange 2000
supports synchronous events, whereas earlier versions of Exchange
supported only asynchronous events.
• Introduce the Workflow Designer for Exchange 2000 Server and CDO
Workflow Objects for Exchange 2000 Server interfaces that are used to
create a workflow process.
vi Module 1: Introduction to Exchange 2000 and the Web Storage System


!
Managing Exchange 2000
Introduce Exchange System Manager. Explain that you will not be covering
Exchange administration but only the tasks that a developer may need to
perform to set up a Web application on Exchange or to set up users to test
an application. Discuss the types of tasks that a developer may perform
when managing stores, storages groups, and public folders. Explain why a
developer would set up a virtual server and describe the configurable
settings. Finally, explain how to set up mail-enabled users by using Active
Directory Users and Computers.
This section concludes with a demonstration on how to use Active Directory
Users and Computers to add a mail-enabled user.

Module 1: Introduction to Exchange 2000 and the Web Storage System 1


Overview
!
Introduction to Exchange 2000
!
Introduction to the Web Storage System
!
Developmental Features of the Web Storage System
!
Managing Exchange 2000


Critical to the success of any program is that users can easily organize, find,
search, secure, and access information. Microsoft
®
Exchange 2000 Server,
along with the Microsoft Web Storage System, has the functionality to develop
collaborative solutions that enable users to seamlessly access and update
Exchange 2000 information.
After completing this module, you will be able to:
!
Describe the main features of the three versions of Exchange 2000 and
describe the data structure of Exchange 2000.
!
Describe the features and functionality of Web Storage System in
Exchange 2000.
!
Describe the development features supported by Web Storage System,
including support of Internet protocols, Microsoft Application Programming
Interfaces (APIs), Collaboration Data Objects (CDO), Web forms, events
programming, and workflow.
!
Manage Exchange 2000 stores, storage groups, public folders, and virtual
servers by using Exchange System Manager and add mail-enabled users by
using the Active Directory

directory service Users and Computers.

Topic Objective
To provide an overview of
the module topics and
objectives.
Lead-in
In this module, you will learn
about the features and
functions that the Web
Storage System brings to
Exchange 2000.
2 Module 1: Introduction to Exchange 2000 and the Web Storage System


#
##
#

Introduction to Exchange 2000
!
Versions of Exchange 2000
!
Stores
!
Storage Groups
!
Folder Trees
!
Integration with Active Directory


Exchange 2000 is a reliable, scalable messaging environment that offers a full
set of features and components to support the development of collaborative
solutions.
Exchange 2000 is the first product to take advantage of a new data storage
technology called the Web Storage System. Exchange 2000 uses the Web
Storage System to store all of its data. An understanding of the data structure of
Exchange 2000 will enable you to perceive how the Web Storage System
integrates with Exchange 2000.
Topic Objective
To list the topics related to
introduction to
Exchange 2000.
Lead-in
Exchange 2000 is a
messaging environment that
supports the development of
collaborative solutions.
Module 1: Introduction to Exchange 2000 and the Web Storage System 3


Versions of Exchange 2000
Exchange 2000 Server
Exchange 2000
Enterprise
Server
Exchange 2000
Conferencing Server
Microsoft
NetMeeting


There are three versions of Exchange 2000: Exchange 2000 Server, Exchange
2000 Enterprise Server, and Exchange 2000 Conferencing Server.
Exchange 2000 Server
Designed to meet the messaging and collaboration needs of businesses that
need only one server running Exchange, Exchange 2000 Server is limited to a
single, 16-gigabyte (GB) database per server.
Exchange 2000 includes instant messaging, a function for sending an
immediate, text-based message to another user on a computer network. The
client software for instant messaging in Exchange 2000 is the Microsoft MSN
®

Messenger Service.
Closely associated with instant messaging is presence information. Presence
information enables one computer user to determine whether another user is
currently logged on to a network, corporate LAN, or the Internet. You can set
presence information to indicate a particular status (for example, on the phone
or out of the office). The status is updated automatically after a period of
computer inactivity.
Exchange 2000 Enterprise Server
Designed for organizations that need multiple servers and features, such as
unlimited message storage and the ability to have multiple stores per server,
Exchange 2000 Enterprise includes instant messaging and presence
information. It also includes the following features:
!
Chat services
Chat services provide a low-bandwidth, lightweight method of real-time
communication between two or more people. Chat is commonly used to
build online communities of users who are interested in discussing similar
topics or issues.
Topic Objective
To show the environment for
each version of Exchange
2000.
Lead-in
There are three versions of
Exchange 2000.
4 Module 1: Introduction to Exchange 2000 and the Web Storage System


!
Front-end and back-end deployment
Exchange 2000 can be configured as a set of front-end and back-end
servers, enabling users to connect to virtual Internet Protocol (IP)–
addressable front-end servers, while storing messages and collaboration data
on separate back-end servers. This configuration flexibility provides new
opportunities for enterprise customers to tailor their system architecture to
meet the demands of corporate acquisition and growth.
!
Clustering
Clustering allows you to group servers that host the same set of services into
manageable units to improve the reliability of the services. If one server in
the cluster fails, another server in the cluster can start and keep the services
running. Clustering support in Exchange 2000 has been enhanced to feature
Active/Active clustering. Based on the Microsoft Clustering Services of
Microsoft Windows
®
2000 Advanced Server, Active/Active clustering
enables all of the servers used in a cluster to actively process messaging
requests and distribute the load evenly between the servers in the cluster,
thereby increasing scalability.

Exchange 2000 Conferencing Server
Designed for organizations of all sizes that need to organize and manage data,
voice, and video conferencing between people regardless of location. You can
use Exchange 2000 Conferencing Server in conjunction with Exchange Server
or Enterprise Server. Exchange 2000 data conferencing allows dynamic, on-
demand sharing of data and information by using clients such as Microsoft
NetMeeting
®
. This gives users the ability to see, chat, and share information
with one another.
Exchange 2000 Conferencing Server tracks scheduled conferences and controls
attendee access to conferences. For users, the benefits are single-click access to
conferences and full integration into their calendars.

Module 1: Introduction to Exchange 2000 and the Web Storage System 5


Stores
Mailbox
Mailbox
Store
Store
Bill
Inbox
Hello.eml
Contact
Public
Public
Store
Store
Public Folders
Expense Report
ExpenseReports.xls
Presentations
Company Meeting.avi


Exchange 2000 stores its data in databases. Exchange 2000 databases are more
commonly referred to as stores. Exchange 2000 can store all kinds of data such
as e-mail messages, graphics, voice mail, and video presentations.
Exchange 2000 supports multiple stores within one logical database. All store
data is kept in Joint Engine Technology (JET) databases.
Store Types
There are two kinds of stores in Exchange 2000, mailbox stores and public
stores. These replace the private and public information stores of earlier
versions of Exchange. Each store is referred to as a Web Storage System.
During the installation process, Exchange 2000 creates a default mailbox store
and a public store.
!
Mailbox store. A database that contains folders and items intended for use
by a single user or program. A mailbox is the delivery location for all
incoming messages for a designated owner. Only the owner of a mailbox
can access the contents.
A mailbox can contain received messages, message attachments, folders,
documents, and other files. Information in a user's mailbox is stored in a
mailbox store on an Exchange 2000 server. Exchange 2000 can have
multiple mailbox stores. However, mailbox stores cannot be replicated to
other servers running Exchange 2000.
!
Public store. A database that contains folders and items intended for sharing
between different users and programs. Public stores can contain different
types of resources, ranging from custom forms to Internet content stored in
its native format. This database is located on the server running Exchange
2000 and can be replicated to other servers running Exchange 2000.

Topic Objective
To present the default
mailbox and public stores as
displayed by the Exchange
System Manager.
Lead-in
Exchange 2000 stores its
data in databases called
stores.
6 Module 1: Introduction to Exchange 2000 and the Web Storage System


Store Contents
Public and mailbox stores can contain the following components:
!
Folders. A collection of items, which can be discrete items or other folders.
!
Resources. Any item contained in a folder, such as an e-mail message,
document, folder, HTML file, or Active Server Pages (ASP) program.
!
Properties. Items can have any number of properties associated with them.
For example, author and creation date are properties of a document.

Module 1: Introduction to Exchange 2000 and the Web Storage System 7


Storage Groups
!
Storage Groups contain Multiple Stores
Storage Group A
Store
Store
Store
Store
Store
Store
Store
Store
Store
Store
Transaction Log
Transaction Log
Transaction Log
Storage Group B
Store
Store
Store
Store
Store
Store
Store
Store
Store
Store
Transaction Log
Transaction Log
Transaction Log


You can group Exchange 2000 stores into logical constructs called storage
groups. Storage groups create more efficient management; because storage
group properties apply to all stores in the group, you can manage the stores by
configuring only the storage group.
All the stores in a storage group share a common transaction log. The
transaction log for a storage group contains the database transactions for all
mailbox stores or public folder stores in the group. Each store transaction in a
storage group is written to a log file first and then to the databases. When a log
file reaches 5 megabytes (MB), it is renamed and a new log file is started.
If a database fails, you can recover the transactions by restoring the data from
the log files. All of the databases in a store share the same transaction logs and
usually the same backup and restore policies and procedures. Keep this in mind
when determining the number and placement of stores and storage groups.

Exchange 2000 supports multiple storage groups. You can configure up
to five stores in one storage group.

Topic Objective
To depict the concept of
stores in a storage group.
Lead-in
You group stores into
storage groups for easier
maintenance.
Note
8 Module 1: Introduction to Exchange 2000 and the Web Storage System


Folder Trees
!
Public Folder Trees
$
Provide access to the default public and mailbox stores
$
Support HTTP, SMTP, POP3, IMAP4, NNTP, and MAPI
!
Advantages of Public Folder Trees
$
Provide a common place for data storage and application hosting
$
Configure permissions for data and applications at folder level
$
Easy to enhance or adapt the folder for another purpose
!
Folder Tree Replicas
$
Distribute the user load on servers
$
Distribute public folders across geographical areas
$
Back up public folder data


In each store are folder trees that contain Exchange 2000 items, such as e-mail
messages, documents, and other folders. A folder tree is a hierarchy of folders
in an Exchange store. Folder trees represent public and mailbox stores, each
folder tree can contain multiple folders, and each folder tree represents its own
store.
Public Folders Tree
By default, Exchange includes a public folder tree named Public Folders. The
Public Folders tree provides access to the default public store and default
mailbox store. The Public Folders tree supports Hypertext Transfer Protocol
(HTTP), Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP), Post Office Protocol 3
(POP3), Internet Message Access Protocol 4 (IMAP4), Network News
Transport Protocol (NNTP) and MAPI. You can create additional folder trees
with the same access as the default Public Folders tree, except for support for
MAPI. For example, if you create a new Public Folders tree, it will not be
accessible from Microsoft Outlook
®
2000, which is a MAPI client.
From a developer’s perspective, public folders are significant components of a
Web solution. Public folders provide the following advantages:
!
Provide a common place for data storage and application hosting.
!
Configure permissions for data and applications at the folder level. By doing
this, if you need to move or copy an application to a different folder and
adapt it for a different purpose, all of the permissions, code and data move
with the application.
!
Are easy to adapt for a different purpose or to enhance without having to
write a significant amount of code because the components are kept
together. This is unlike traditional applications or even other Web-based
applications, which keep data, application, permissions, and other parts of
the package separated.

Topic Objective
To define public folder trees
and their advantages, and to
describe the features of
replicas.
Lead-in
Folders provide access to
data in public stores and
mailbox stores. For a
developer, public folders are
significant components of a
Web solution.
Key Points
Emphasize the distinction
between a MAPI folder
hierarchy and all other folder
hierarchies. In other
hierarchies MAPI can
access only the mailbox
folder and the public folder
tree, if you create a new
folder tree, everything can
access it except MAPI.
Module 1: Introduction to Exchange 2000 and the Web Storage System 9


Folder Tree Replicas
You can configure a folder tree to have replicas on multiple servers. Replicas
are useful for distributing the user load on servers, distributing public folders
across geographical areas, and backing up public folder data. You can set up a
replication schedule based on how often data in the public folder changes. You
can set this schedule for all public folders or for a specific public folder. You
configure replication by using the Exchange System Manager.
10 Module 1: Introduction to Exchange 2000 and the Web Storage System


Integration with Active Directory
Benefits of Active Directory Integration
!
Centralized Object Management
!
Easy Access to Directory Information using LDAP
!
Synchronizes Exchange Legacy Directory Information to
Active Directory Using the Active Directory Connector


Previous versions of Exchange Server had a dedicated directory. In
Exchange 2000, all directory information (including mailboxes, information
about servers, and so on) is stored in Active Directory.
Active Directory stores data for a large and customizable set of objects.
Integration with Active Directory provides increased system performance and
manageability while making directory management easier.
Some of the benefits of Active Directory are:
!
Centralized object management.
Unified administration of Exchange 2000 and Windows 2000 directory
objects enable an administrator to manage all user data in one place, with
one set of tools.
!
Easier access to directory information.
Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) is the preferred access
protocol for directory information.
!
Active Directory Connector.
The Active Directory Connector synchronizes directory information from a
previous Exchange System directory to Windows 2000 Active Directory.

Topic Objective
To list the benefits of
integrating Active Directory
with Exchange 2000.
Lead-in
In Exchange 2000, Active
Directory stores all
Exchange 2000 directory
information.
Module 1: Introduction to Exchange 2000 and the Web Storage System 11


#
##
#

Introduction to the Web Storage System
!
Web Storage System Overview
!
Web Storage System Database Features


As stated previously, Exchange 2000 is the first product to incorporate Web
Storage System technology.
Web Storage System combines the features and functionality of the file system,
the Web, and a collaboration server through a single location. You can use the
Web Storage System for storing, accessing, and managing Exchange data, as
well as for building and running programs. In the future, other Microsoft
products will also include the Web Storage System.
Topic Objective
To list the topics related to
Introduction to the Web
Storage System in
Exchange 2000.
Lead-in
The Web Storage System
combines the features and
functionality of the file
system, the Web, and a
collaboration server through
a single location.
12 Module 1: Introduction to Exchange 2000 and the Web Storage System


Web Storage System Overview
URL
Addressable
Resources
URL
Addressable
Resources
Folder (ExpenseReports)
file://.backofficestorage/nwtraders.msft/public folders/ExpenseReports
http://servername/public/ExpenseReports
Folder (TimeCards)
file://.backofficestorage/nwtraders.msft/public folders/TimeCards
http://servername/public/TimeCards
Folder (Survey)
file://.backofficestorage/nwtraders.msft/public folders/Survey
http://servername/public/Survey
Public Store (Public Folders)
file://.backofficestorage/nwtraders.msft/public folders
http://servername/public
Public Store (Public Folders)
file://.backofficestorage/nwtraders.msft/public folders
http://servername/public
Item (PaulWest.doc)
file://.backofficestorage/nwtraders.msft/public folders/Survey/PaulWest.doc
http://servername/public/Survey/PaulWest.doc
Item (SuzanFine.xls)
file://.backofficestorage/nwtraders.msft/public folders/Survey/SuzanFine.xls
http://servername/public/Survey/SuzanFine.xls


Although you store items in Exchange 2000 databases, you use the Web
Storage System technology to access the items. The Web Storage System is a
database organized into a hierarchy of folders.
Web Storage System Resources
Each folder in the Web Storage System can contain any number of items, called
resources. A resource can be any Exchange item, such as an e-mail message, an
appointment, contact information, streaming video, or another folder.
Every resource in the Web Storage System has a URL that you can use to
access the resource. For example, a survey document in a public folder may
have the following URL:
http://servername/public/Survey/PaulWest.doc
Another example is a contact in an administrator's Inbox with the
following URL:
http://servername/exchange/administrator/inbox/Hello.eml
Topic Objective
To show a representation of
the Web Storage System in
Exchange 2000.
Lead-in
The Web Storage System is
a hierarchical database in
which each item is
accessible by a URL.
Module 1: Introduction to Exchange 2000 and the Web Storage System 13


Web Storage System Schema
The Web Storage System provides a default schema. A schema is a collection
of properties that are associated with a resource. With the Web Storage System
schema you can perform tasks such as describing resources, implementing
security on resources and folders, and providing business logic.
The default schema provides a set of properties that satisfy the requirements of
most solutions. For example, the Web Storage System recognizes e-mail
messages stored in Exchange 2000 as a type of resource (message) and
associates the To, From, and Subject properties with the resource. You can use
schema properties to index, sort, and query resources just as you would on a
relational database, such as Microsoft SQL Server

. For example, you can
perform a search on all expense report resources that have the custom property
total set to a value of over $500.00.
You can also extend the default schema for use in your programs. For example,
you can create the schema definition for an expense report and associate default
schema properties of the Web Storage System and custom properties with the
definition.
14 Module 1: Introduction to Exchange 2000 and the Web Storage System


Web Storage System Database Features
!
Multiple Database Support
!
Native File Format Support
!
Streaming Media Support
!
Content Indexing and Searching Support


Each store in Exchange 2000 is a Web Storage System database. The Web
Storage System database offers flexibility for developing programs.
Multiple Database Support
You can define multiple stores with Exchange 2000. Because stores have no
size limit, you can use multiple stores placed on different servers to enhance the
flexibility of backup and restore tasks, indexing, and replication. In addition,
you can configure nearly every store control on a store-by-store basis.

Smaller physical stores increase overall system reliability, enable a much
faster backup process, and speed up the recovery process in the event of
hardware failure. For example, if the hardware that contains one of your stores
fails, only that store is affected during repair, while any stores contained on
different hardware continue to serve their e-mail users.

Native File Format Support
Web Storage System supports the storage of multimedia formats and
Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME) content. Client applications or
any computer operating environment that uses standard Internet protocols such
as HTTP, SMTP, IMAP4, and POP3 can store audio, video, voice, or other
multimedia formats as streams of MIME data in the Web Storage System
without conversion into another format, which was required by earlier versions
of Exchange.
Streaming Media Support
By using the file streaming interfaces of the Web Storage System, you can store
resources, such as multimedia files, in their native format to ensure data
integrity. You can access these resources while they are streaming to the client
instead of waiting for the entire file to download.
Topic Objective
To list the database features
of the Web Storage System
Lead-in
Each Exchange store is a
Web Storage System and
uses the Web Storage
System to access items in
the store.
Note

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