Tải bản đầy đủ

2014 advanced vent modes

Mechanical Ventilation:
Advanced Ventilator Modes
AATS/STS Cardiothoracic Critical Care Symposium
AATS Annual Meeting
Toronto, Canada
April 27th 2014


No Disclosures
Aaron M Cheng, MD FACS
University of Washington
Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery
Co‐Director, UWMC Cardiothoracic ICU
Seattle, Washington


Mechanical Ventilation:
SUPPORTIVE NOT THERAPEUTIC 

• Airway protection
• Support gas exchange

• Reduce work of breathing


Different Vent Modes:
ALL Use Positive Pressure Ventilation
• Vent MODES:  Differences 
in how PPV is applied
• PPV  LUNG INJURY
• ALL  VENT MODES CAN 
CAUSE LUNG INJURY


Mechanical Ventilator Support
DIFFERENT VENT MODES

PSV
NAVA
PAV

Volume‐AC 
Pressure‐AC 
PRVC

APRV
HFOV
HFPV


Ventilator Basics
4 Phases during Ventilator Cycle
Breath Initiation
Flow delivery phase

Breath termination
Expiratory phase

Control Variables (Target)
• Pressure, Volume/Flow

Phase Variables
• Trigger—Initiation of inspiratory 
phase: Pressure, Flow, or Time
• Limit– Sustains inspiratory cycle eg. 
Limit flow 50 L/min
• Cycle– Ends inspiratory cycle eg. Cycle 
at TV 500 ml
• Baseline– Usually passive‐‐depends on 
airway resistance & lung elastance

Conditional Variables
IfThen programming eg. 

Switching to patient trigger 
from machine trigger



Assist‐Control (AC): 
Most common ICU vent mode

• Control: Pressure or Volume
• Trigger: (Patient effort & sensitivity)Pressure, 
Flow, or  (Machine)Time 
• Limit: Pressure, Flow, or Volume 
• Cycle: (Machine) Flow, Volume, Pressure, Time


Pressure or Volume:
Is there a difference?
Assist Control‐‐VOLUME

Advantages

Disadvantages

Constant Tidal Volume (Vt)

Peak alveolar pressure are 
variable‐‐Over distension 
risk

PaCO2 constant

Cannot respond to changes 
in ventilator demand‐‐flow 
limited

Changes in Peak Inspiratory 
pressure easy to detect
Assist Control‐‐PRESSURE

Advantages

Disadvantages

Peak alveolar pressure is 
limited

Vt is variable

Flow responds to patient

PaCO2 can vary

Better vent synchrony


Decelerating flow waveform
• Decelerating flow 
waveform
– Increased mPaw
– Decreased PIP
– Improved 
oxygenation


Dual Modes: Combines features of 
pressure & volume target to achieve 
goals of ventilation
• Known by different names
– Volume Assured Pressure Support
• Pressure Augmentation

– Pressure Regulated Volume Control
• Auto‐flow
• Variable Pressure Control


Dual Modes: Pressure regulated 
volume control (PRVC)

• Pressure control waveform 
but “guaranteed tidal 
volume”
• Ventilator (Machine) adjusts 
Pressure target to least value 
needed to maintain minimum 
Tidal Volume target


Pressure control compared to PRVC

PCV: Pressure remains constant
and volume changes (decreases)
due to changes in lung
compliance

PRVC: Pressure target is adjusted
to changes in compliance to meet
volume target


Rescue Ventilator Modes:
APRV
Hi Frequency Oscillation


Airway Pressure Release Ventilation
• “Inverse‐ratio” Bi‐
Level Mode
• Maintains Lung 
Volume throughout 
cycle
– CO2 clearance occurs  • Settings
– PHigh & PLow
with pressure release 
& spontaneous 
– THigh & TLow
breathing


APRV: Spontaneous Breathing


Reported benefits of APRV
• Decreases VILI
– Reduces peak airway pressures

• Promotes improved aeration at lung bases—
where atelectasis commonly occurs
• Allows patient to breathe while providing 
“OPEN” lung ventilation
– Less sedation needed

• Improves oxygenation
– Higher mean airway pressure (mPaw)


The role of APRV
• Frequently used in awake patients with 
moderate‐severe ARDS
– Decreased sedation requirement less vasoactive 
requirements

• Improved aeration & cardiovascular stability 
lost when patient unable to breathe 
spontaneously
– Can be detrimental in patient with high ventilatory
requirements & severe obstructive lung disease
• Hyperinflation High alveolar pressure Barotrauma


High Frequency Oscillation: 
OSCILLATE & OSCAR

Multi‐center randomized controlled trials comparing 
Adult patients with ARDS to treatment with Conventional 
mechanical ventilation versus HFOV


OSCILLATE trial terminated early due 
to increased in‐hospital mortality in 
the HFOV arm (47% versus 35%)

OSCAR trial demonstrated no 
difference in 30‐day mortality 
between groups: HFOV was not 
superior


Adaptive Ventilator Modes:
Adapting the ventilator to the patient
(Better synchrony through technology)

Increasing Ventilator Assistance

PAV
NAVA

Pressure
Support

Increasing  Patient Effort


Proportional Assist Ventilation (PAV)
• Adaptive mode:  Delivers ventilator “breath” 
proportional to patient’s instantaneous effort
– Airway pressure delivered is NOT CONSTANT 
Differs from Pressure Support
– “Breath” delivered depends on Patient’s 
respiratory mechanics & set level of assistance (0‐
100%) to respiratory muscles

• Referred to as “POWER STEERING” Vent Mode


Proportional Assist Ventilation


Drawback: difficult to learn to use


Neurally Adjusted Ventilator Assist 
(NAVA)
• Partial vent support mode
• Pressure controlled
• Pressure delivered proportional to diaphragm electrical 
activity

• Trigger and cycle set to electrical activity of 
diaphragm
• Can be applied with non‐invasive ventilation


Tài liệu bạn tìm kiếm đã sẵn sàng tải về

Tải bản đầy đủ ngay

×

×