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AZAR GRAMMAR SERIES expansion activities beginning level 3rd edition

Expansion Activities
written by Maria Spelleri

Beginning Level
Azar Grammar Series: Basic English Grammar, 3rd edition
Expansion Activities are interactive tasks and games that focus on the grammar covered in the
tables of contents of the Azar textbooks or any comparable syllabus. You may download,
reproduce and adapt the material to suit your classroom needs.

Chapter 1—Using Be
Categories

Chapter 2—Using Be and Have
Find the Answer

Chapter 3—Using the Simple Present
Developing a Character

Chapter 4—Using the Present Progressive
Teacher—You're Wrong!


Chapter 5—Talking about the Present
Draw the Picture
Blind Copying

Chapter 6—Nouns and Pronouns
Adjective-Noun Mime

Chapter 7—Count and Noncount Nouns
Shopping for a Recipe

Chapter 8—Expressing Past Time, Part 1
Family Tree

Chapter 9—Expressing Past Time, Part 2
Narrating a Movie Scene
Alibi

Chapter 10—Expressing Future Time, Part 1
Planning a Vacation

Chapter 11—Expressing Future Time, Part 2
National Costumes
What's going to happen next?

Chapter 12—Modals, Part 1: Expressing Ability
Job Interview Questions

Chapter 13—Modals, Part 2: Advice, Necessity, Requests, Suggestions
Advice, Necessity, Requests, Suggestions

Chapter 14—Nouns and Modifiers
Modifier Mad Lib

Chapter 15—Possessives
Whose are these?

Chapter 16—Making Comparisons
Creative Comparisons
Fun with World Records


Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 1: Using Be

Activity: Categories
Materials needed: Game cards—one card per pair of students.
(See sample cards following.) It isn’t necessary to have a
completely different card for each pair of students; it’s OK to
have one or two overlapping categories on each card.
Description: Give each pair or group of three students a
grid/game card and make sure they understand their categories.
Teams race against each other to complete their grid with a
singular noun that fits in each category. For example, if the
category is “machine,” the team might fill their category with the
words “coffee maker,” “TV,” “car,” “washing machine,”
“forklift,” “pencil sharpener.”
Set a time limit depending on the level of your class so that some people might complete their
cards, but others won’t. At the limit, shout “Time’s up!” and ask everyone to put their pencils
down. Teams with completed cards get to go first. They need to check their answers with the rest
of the class by making statements like “A coffee maker is a machine,” “A car is a machine,” etc.
The teacher can encourage variety by writing on the board the different ways students can check
their answers:
“A car is a machine.”
“A car, a washing machine, and a coffee maker are machines.”
“Coffee makers are machines.” [With common nouns only, not with proper or unique
nouns, like “jazz music”]
“London is a city.” [No article with proper nouns]
The students who have not completed their cards can ask for help from other pairs. They can
announce which category they need help with, and other students can offer advice using the
target language, like “Turtles are pets,” or “Antarctica is a continent.”
In addition, teams can challenge each other by saying things like “Tomatoes aren’t vegetables!
They’re fruit!”
Here are some other categories for making game cards. Be sure to spread out the proper nouns
among various cards:
house pet, musical instrument, wild animal, form of transportation, movie, month, season,
language, city, country, vegetable, fruit, sport, drink, insect, fish, color, number, continent
electronic device, teacher, relative, movie stars, kinds of music, part of the body, class/course
(English, math, chemistry, etc.), object in space (planet, star, satellite, sun, comet, etc.)

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Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 1: Using Be

Activity: Categories
Farm Animal

Flower

Vegetable

Student in My
Class

Language

Car Company

Pet

Ocean/River

School/University Fruit

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Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 2: Using Be and Have

Activity: Find the Answer
Materials needed: Slips of papers with questions on some and answers on others. The questions
should be on one color slip and the answers on a different color slip. Be careful to have only one
possible answer to each question.
Description: First, students should take a minute to read their slip and
commit their question or their answer to memory.
Next, have all the students mingle and the students with question slips
ask (not read!) their questions to those students who have answer slips,
trying to find the answer that fits their questions. Students with answer
slips don’t have to wait to be approached, however; they can state their
answer to those with questions!
When students have found their match, they pair off, stand to the side, and wait for everyone to
finish before orally checking in logical order: question -- answer, next question -- answer, etc.
Sample Questions and Answers (enough for 24 students):
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.

Who’s that woman? She’s my aunt.
What’s that? That’s my pet snake.
Where is your office? It’s on Third Street.
Are you sick? No, I’m just sleepy.
Is your umbrella in the car? No, it’s at home.
Is your father in Egypt? Yes, he is.
Are we late? No, you aren’t.
Is Nina your friend? Yes, she is.
Where are you? I’m in my car.
Where are your books? They’re in my office.
Who are those people? They’re my neighbors.
Are your shoes dirty? No, they aren’t.

Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use.


Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 3: Using the Simple Present

Activity: Developing a Character
Materials needed: Pictures of interesting people, preferably within a context.
Some sample pictures are linked here, but pictures can be found in magazines
and in photography and history texts.
Description: Tell students that when authors write books or screenplay
writers write movies, they need to make their characters come alive. This
means they create entire lives for their characters; they give them friends,
families, childhoods, hobbies, work, likes and dislikes, habits, styles of
dressing, and other things that may not be important to the story, but help the
character become a “real person.”
In this activity, the students will create a character and breathe life into him or her.
Assign each pair or group a photo of a person. Using the simple present tense, students are to
imagine a life for this person. As a variation on this activity, use a limited number of pictures so
that at least two groups have the same picture. Afterwards, you can compare the different “lives”
each group created for the same picture.
Example:
This is Angie. She’s 26 years old and single. She lives in New York
City. She lives in an apartment, and she has a roommate. Angie works in a
kitchen store, but she doesn’t like her job. She wants to be a rock star.
Every Saturday, she sings with a band. She is a good singer. She sometimes
colors her hair orange. Angie has a boyfriend, Ryan. He is a lawyer. He wants to marry her, but
she doesn’t want to get married right now. She wants to be famous. She has a little brother. Her
brother lives with her parents. Angie calls him a lot. Sometimes, she takes her brother out for
lunch.
Completed work can be displayed together with the picture, or students can read/present to the
class.

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Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use.


Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 3: Using the Simple Present

Activity: Developing a Character
People pictures:
http://www.open-eyes.net/index.php?showimage=149
http://www.open-eyes.net/index.php?showimage=47
http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/prints/pr21436.jpg
http://www.newseagles.com/portfolio/portrait-01.html (lots of people under “portraits”)
http://www.pbase.com/chris67/130_interesting_people (collection of people pics)
http://kereszt.hajdok.hu/?image=crw_9531
http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/reference/rc17760.jpg
http://www.pbase.com/chris67/image/45353666
http://kereszt.hajdok.hu/?image=crw_5171
http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/2173/1223/1600/DSC06134.0.jpg
http://www.pbase.com/chris67/image/39943400
http://www.flickr.com/photos/24698274@N00/420522095/

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Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use.


Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 4: Using the Present Progressive

Activity: Teacher – You’re Wrong!
Materials needed: A variety of pictures showing activity -- things
that students can talk about as happening now. Each photo should have
at least four things that “are happening” now. Some sample pictures
are linked below, but pictures can easily be found in magazines.
Description: Show the class a picture and begin to describe what is
happening in the picture, using the present progressive. At some point, describe something that
isn’t true. When the students hear something that isn’t happening, they should shout out or raise
their hand and use the negative present progressive to state the error, followed by a positive
statement, if possible.
For example: “The man isn’t walking his dog. He is walking a pig!”
It’s important to plan in advance what you want to say about each picture, as well as what false
statement you want to make. Not having to search or stumble for things to say will make the
activity go more smoothly.
Also, this activity requires thinking of “happening now” from a different perspective. A
deceptively simple photo of a man and woman walking and talking in a park may, at first glance,
seem to have two or three progressive elements at most.
But in fact:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.

They are walking.
The woman is talking.
The man is listening to the woman.
The man is smiling.
The woman is moving her hands.
The woman’s hair is blowing.
The sun is shining.
The woman is looking at the man.
The man is wearing brown pants and a hat.
The woman is wearing a long skirt.
The woman is carrying a purse.
The man is touching his tie.
They are enjoying themselves.
They are falling in love.

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Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 4: Using the Present Progressive

Activity: Teacher – You’re Wrong!
From this point of view, it won’t be that hard to find “action” photos!
Activity photos:
http://www.worldofstock.com/closeups/PWO1380.php
http://www.pbase.com/dotfoto/image/51768658
http://www.pbase.com/dotfoto/image/51794151
http://www.pbase.com/dotfoto/image/57408477
http://www.pbase.com/dotfoto/image/59136347
http://www.sergiopessolano.it/galleria/nazioni/india/people/pages/IM02-17.htm
http://www.sergiopessolano.it/galleria/nazioni/india/people/pages/IC09-06.htm

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Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 5: Talking About the Present

Activity: Draw this Picture
Materials needed: One or several “Still Life” type paintings with many objects. As an
alternative to a still life, an interior design photo of a room in a house, or a home exterior.
Some linked examples are provided below. Also needed: blank paper for drawing and
pencils.
Description: Students work in pairs. One student has the picture/photo and describes the
scene using primarily the target language of “there is/there are” and prepositions of
location. The second student tries to recreate the picture by drawing it as his partner
describes.
Example of the language used:
A: “There is a big, round table in the middle of the picture. There’s a basket in the center
of the table. There are a lot of apples in the basket. Under the table, on the left side,
there’s a dog. A white dog with black spots.”
B: “Is the dog sitting or standing?”
A: “It’s asleep.”
B: “Is there anything else on the table?”
A: “Yes. There is a blue bottle, like a wine bottle. It’s next to the basket. And there are
some forks on the table.”
B: “Where are they?”
A: “The forks are in front of the basket.”
When the student has done his or her best to complete the drawing, the drawing should be
compared to the original. How close did they come in their recreation?
Sample pictures:
http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/artObjectDetails?artobj=763&handle=li
http://www.lindapaul.com/French_Country_Kitchen_Decorating_Art_Canvas.asp
http://www.himalayatours.com.cn/india/ztzl/honeymoon/hotel/agra-hotel-room.jpg
http://www.kelownagolfski.com/Discovery%20Bay%20Kelowna%20144%20Living%20
Room%204x6.JPG

Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use.


Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 5: Talking About the Present

Activity: Blind Copying
Materials needed: Create pairs of bags each containing 69 common objects. Each pair of bags must contain the same
items although variations in details are OK. Some ideas for
objects that are easy to find multiples of are cups, saucers,
forks, spoons, napkins, match boxes, fruit, canned or dried
food, desk items like rolls of tape, erasers, paper clips,
pencils, rulers, calculators, staplers, other common items like paperback books, wood or
plastic blocks, toy cars, Lego pieces, play money, other small plastic toys, personal items
like band-aids, nail clippers, toothpaste, combs, bottles of vitamins or aspirin, etc.
Description: In this pair activity, students sit back to back with a desk surface in front of
each of them. Each student in the pair has a matched bag of items. The first student
empties his items on the desk. Instruct the first student to quickly arrange the items in a
creative and complicated manner. Some objects might be stacked, balanced, placed in a
circle, crossed, stood upside down, placed one inside the other, etc.
Now, the first student instructs the second student to arrange his or her items so that the
two arrangements will look identical.
Example:
Student 1: Put the book in the middle of the desk. Put the cup on the book. Put the pencil
on the right side of the book.
Student 2: Up and down the book? Or pointing out?
Student 1: The pencil is in a line with the book. Now, put the rubber band on the left side
of the book and open it like a circle. Put the penny in the circle. In the cup, put the
scissors.
Student 2: Do the scissors point up or down?
When the second student believes the second arrangement is complete, the student can
describe back to the first student what the copied arrangement looks like to confirm they
are the same. Finally, the students should turn around and see what they have
accomplished together.
Note: Penny Ur has a similar activity in her book Grammar Practice Activities
(Cambridge University Press) in which Lego blocks or Cuisenaire Rods are used.

Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use.


Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 6: Nouns and Pronouns

Activity: Adjective-Noun Mime
Materials needed: Index cards cut into quarters, or slips of papers. On each slip, write one of the
noun phrases below. Put them in a bag, hat, etc.
Description: In this activity, students mime noun phrases consisting of an
adjective and a noun. Before starting the activity, write all the possible answers
on the board. Then ask the first student to select a card at random. The student
needs to mime the selected noun phrase while the rest of the class guesses. Note
that the phrases consisting of people will often require the student to think about
both the adjective and the noun. For example, how will a student’s portrayal of an
angry boss be different from a portrayal of an angry mother? Or how will they
portray the difference between a sad athlete and a healthy athlete?
To increase language use, omit the article on the board but require students to use it in their
guesses.
an old man
a rich woman
a lazy student
a hungry policeman
a famous actor
an angry boss
an intelligent author
a dangerous driver
a sad athlete
a kind policeman
a sour lemon
a ripe apple
a difficult math problem
a boring movie
a beautiful painting
an old car
a fresh salad
a quiet cat

a happy boy
a serious teacher
a worried mother
a tired student
a healthy athlete
an angry mother
a nervous driver
a poor man
a busy teacher
a tired author
a wonderful smell
a dirty face
a hot cup of coffee
an interesting book
a bright light
a new dress
a delicious cake
a noisy video game

Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use.


Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 7: Count and Noncount Nouns

Activity: Shopping for a Recipe
Materials needed: None
Description: In pairs or groups of three, students think of a recipe
for something they want to cook/prepare. If possible, match
students with similar ethnic backgrounds because it is easier for
them to come up with a common food. If students are of different
backgrounds, and they can’t agree on a recipe, suggest an omelet, a
green salad, or a sub sandwich.
When students agree on a recipe to prepare, one person in the pair/group acts as a scribe to write
down the ingredients and the measurements of the ingredients they will need. Check them at this
point to make sure they have the vocabulary they need for things like “a pinch,” “teaspoon,”
“tablespoon,” “slice,” etc.
Next, instruct the class that they now have to prepare a shopping list to purchase the ingredients
they will need. On this list, they should include the retail packaging/measurement of the item.
For example, the recipe may call for one teaspoon of salt, and the shopping list would then
include a box of salt. If the recipe requires two cups of milk, the shopping list would include a
carton/container/gallon of milk. A different scribe should take over for this part, writing items in
the list.
To close this activity, write a creative dialogue about the recipe, the shopping list, and what is
needed. One possible scenario: one person is going to the store and the other person is telling
him or her what they need to buy. This scenario will use the packaging/measurement vocabulary.
Another dialogue scenario is a person passing on a special family recipe to another. This will
utilize smaller units of measure like “a cup of.” On the board, write the language that you would
like the students to incorporate like “How much/many?” “a little/a few,” and “some.”

Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use.


Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 8: Expressing Past Time, Part 1

Activity: Family Tree
Materials needed: Blank paper for drawing
Description: This activity might best be done for homework, with results discussed in class.
Demonstrate to the class how to draw a simple family tree. You may even want to make a
template that the students can customize.
Students draw a family tree that has at least parts of three generations. Each
“entry” on the tree should have either a name or relationship (“Myriam Betel”
or “Grandma”). Ask students to think of things to say about each person on the
tree that can be put in the past tense. This doesn’t mean the person has to be
deceased. It can be “got married” “was born” “lived in” “went to school,”
“worked,” “won,” “wrote,” etc. Each entry should also include two to four
words maximum that will remind the student of something the student wants to
say about the person. For example, “cruise ship” might remind the student to
say “My grandfather was a chef on a cruise ship,” or “farm,” “We always
spent summers on my Aunt Georgia’s farm in X.”
When the trees are complete, students share them with a partner. Tell students to bring in any
related family photos to share with their partner. Partners should be encouraged to ask questions.
For an activity the entire class can share, ask students to choose one relative or ancestor to
“honor.” They will prepare and give a brief biographical presentation about this person, using as
many past tense verbs as they can. Tell the students to think of two or three interesting or special
things about this person to illustrate why he or she was chosen. If they have a photograph, so
much the better!

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Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 9: Expressing Past Time, Part 2
Activity: Narrating a Movie Scene
Materials needed: A previously chosen scene or two from a
movie, a device for viewing in class, a worksheet
Description: Pick a scene from a movie that the students
would be able to watch and narrate. It does not have to have a
lot of action although there have to be changes in action in
the scene.
For example, “The girl opened the door. She entered the house. She looked all around.
The floors were dirty. The furniture was dusty. She put down her purse.” and so on.
Variation 1: Prepare a worksheet of cloze sentences that follow the action and
description in the story. Play the scene or part of the scene (depending on the level of
your students), stop the movie, and ask students to complete the worksheet with the
correct past tense verbs.
Variation 2: Write on the board a list of base-form verbs and ask students to use those
verbs, changing them to the past, to describe what they saw. This can be done as a group,
each person adding a bit more.
Variation 3: In pairs, students write a paragraph telling the story. Or, students can
number their papers from 1-5 or 1-8, and think of a sentence for each number. (Using
fewer numbers forces them to think of the key elements of a good summary. Using more
numbers encourages them to analyze details and use more past tense verbs.

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Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 9: Expressing Past Time, Part 2

Activity: Alibi
Materials needed: None
Description: The purpose of this activity is for two separate groups of students to ask questions
of two “suspects” and try to break their alibis.
First, pre-plan a crime story. Details are not necessary; just a bare sketch will
do. Select two students to be the suspects and tell the class the story.
For example: “Last night, sometime between 9:00 P.M. and 11:30 P.M., two
people robbed the bank at the corner of Main Street and Lemon Avenue. The
security camera shows two suspects, well-disguised, turning off the security
system and blowing a hole in the safe.”
At this point, send the two students who are your suspects out of the room. Together, they are to
plan an alibi for each other -- where they were together, what they were doing, what they were
wearing, etc., during the time in question. The alibi should be as detailed as possible: if in a
restaurant, what they were eating; if driving, who was driving, where they were going, what time
they left, etc.
Divide the remaining students into two groups of detectives sitting on separate sides of the
classroom. These two groups should write down questions they plan on asking the suspects.
Questions could include: “Where were you last night between 9 and 11? What were you doing?
Who was with you? What were you wearing? How was the weather?”
After the students (especially the two suspects) have enough time to plan, bring the two suspects
back in the classroom -- with a little drama. For example:
“OK, detectives, we’ve picked up the two suspects. Here they are. You -- go into the first
interrogation room, and you -- go into the second interrogation room. Detectives, when you are
finished interrogating your suspects, switch. Ask them the same questions and see if they give
the same answers. If they don’t, we’ll know they are lying!”
Now each group of students begins to question a suspect. Instruct your groups of detectives not
to interrogate too loudly, or the suspects will overhear the questions and answers and be
forewarned when they switch groups. At least one person in the group should take notes of the
suspect’s responses. When finished, the suspects should get up and switch interrogation groups.
The student detectives now interrogate the second suspect, trying to catch him or her in a
response that is different from the first student’s.

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Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 9: Expressing Past Time, Part 2

Activity: Alibi
To wrap up the activity after some time, ask each group of detectives if they found discrepancies
in the two suspects’ alibis. The students should explain the differences they found. For some
drama, bring the two suspects to the front of the class and ask the groups to decide if they should
be set them free or arrested for the crime.

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Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 10: Expressing Future Time, Part 1
Activity: Planning a Vacation
Materials needed: Students need realia for this activity, either Internet
links to travel destinations or travel brochures for a city or series of cities.
In the United States, the back section of AAA magazine is a great source
of easy-to-access travel information. Also, many hotels, museums, and
other attractions in metropolitan areas have a brochure rack with brochures
for tourists. Finally, teachers can request free brochures online from state
tourist organizations or chambers. Some suitable travel links are also listed
below.
In addition, you can provide students with a template, either on the board or on a worksheet that
divides the time into sections like this:
Friday
Travel Time

Night

Saturday

Sunday

Morning

Morning

Afternoon

Afternoon

Night

Travel Time

Description: In small groups or pairs, students plan a future vacation together. The target
language is be going to and the present progressive for talking about future activities.
Give students the links or the materials they need that show their travel destination. Then, set a
limit, such as a three-day weekend, which they have to agree on and then plan how they will use
their time at their destination. Students have to do everything together on their fantasy trip, but
money is no object!
When everyone is finished, each group presents to the whole class, explaining what they are
going to do, where they are going to stay, and any special restaurants they are going to visit on
their trip.

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Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 10: Expressing Future Time, Part 1
Activity: Planning a Vacation
Destination-related links:
Hilton Resort, Arizona http://www.pointehilton.com/indexsp.cfm (Activities include golf,
tennis, a spa with many services, several restaurants and bars, several swimming pools, fitness
center, nature hikes.)
New York City Tourist http://www.nyctourist.com (Site is a little dense, but has easily
discernable categories for Broadway shows, hotels, restaurants, sports, events, and tours, with a
description of each.)
Visit London http://na.visitlondon.com (Be sure to especially notice the Top Ten Attractions)
Discover Orlando http://www.orlandoinfo.com (Don’t forget to check out Top Deals.)

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Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 11: Expressing Future Time, Part 2
Activity: National Costumes
Materials needed: Either the handout below, or a projected image of
it. Additionally, instructors may wish to create their own.
Description: Students work in pairs to identify the photos of
traditional costumes of many nations. Encourage use of the target
language may, might and maybe.

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Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 11: Expressing Future Time, Part 2
Activity: National Costumes
Do you know which traditional costume is from which country? Discuss these pictures with your
partner. Be sure to use may and might if you are not sure!
Mayan Russian Nigerian Vietnamese
Moroccan Norwegian Tibetan

A

________________

Hawaiian Austrian

Greek

Indian

B _____________________

C _______________________

D_____________________

E _______________________
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Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 11: Expressing Future Time, Part 2
Activity: National Costumes

F _____________________

I__________________________

G _____________________ H ____________________

J ______________________

K ___________________

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Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 11: Expressing Future Time, Part 2
Activity: What’s going to happen next?
Materials needed: A collection of numbered pictures for
which it is possible to imagine what will happen next in time in
the picture (see sample below). Lined paper, one piece per
group, numbered according to each picture, with 7 or 8 empty
lines between each number.
Description: In this activity, students predict what will happen after a moment in time
caught in a photo. Give each group a photo and a lined piece of paper. Tell the students
that each photo is a scene from a book or movie. Ask them to imagine what happens next.
As a group, the students write four future tense sentences predicting what will happen
next, moving sequentially into the future. They can either work as a whole group, or each
student can add one sentence as the paper is passed around the group. Students should
write their sentences next to the number of their picture.
When they finish with the first picture, they trade with another group and repeat the
process until all groups have written for all the pictures. To wrap up, the teacher selects
three or four interesting comparisons of group’s stories to share with the class.
Example:

Student 1:
Student 2:
Student 3:
Student 4:

The hand on the clock is going to move.
The man is going to fall.
The man will land on a flagpole and hold on.
A fire truck will come and help him get down.

(Photo found at http://www.worth1000.com )

Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use.


Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 12: Modals Part 1: Expressing Ability
Activity: Job Interview Questions
Materials needed: A selection of job ads from the newspaper or online resource, about half as
many as there are students. (Some online samples are below.)
Description: Students study job ads and brainstorm the specific skills
needed for the job as well as questions asked in an interview. Pair students
and give each pair two or three job ads. Use each ad more than once so that
two or more pairs will have an ad in common. (This is so there can be some
comparison of the pair work at the end.) If you are unable to find ads that are
appropriate for your students’ level, adapt them as needed.
Students should brainstorm the specific skills and abilities needed for each job. Some clues come
from the ad, while other ideas will come from the students’ knowledge of the job or their
imaginations. Each pair should develop questions that might be asked in the interview for that
job, using the target grammar of can, be able to, and do you know how to….
For example, for the first ad below:
(from the ad itself)
Can you use Word?
Do you know how to use Excel?
Can you file?
Do you know how to speak Spanish?
(from imagination)
Can you type quickly?
Are you able to use a computerized telephone system?
Can you work late?
Do you know how to drive?
When each pair has completed their brainstorms, board the questions for the class, allowing each
group that has the same ad to add to the questions or repair any errors. Take this opportunity with
the whole class to introduce some verbs or vocabulary for job skills.
1. Detail-Oriented Office Assistant – Must be organized. Experience using Word and Excel.
Filing and misc. tasks. Must be able to start immediately. Spanish speaking a plus. Great
company and benefits. Contact Rebecca at (239) 597-7121.
2. Maintenance Tech – Hi-rise condominium on Gulf Shore is seeking experienced general
maintenance person. Air conditioning and pool cleaning skills needed. Excellent working
conditions, pay, and benefits. Pick up application at Le Jardin 4201 Gulfshore Blvd North.
Page 1 of 2
Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use.


Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 12: Modals Part 1: Expressing Ability
Activity: Job Interview Questions
3. DARUMA Japanese Restaurant – NOW HIRING: SERVERS, BUSSERS, HOST/HOSTESS
and CASHIERS. Some lifting, weekends required. Apply in person to 241 Center St.
4. HOPE Hospice and Community Services Full time and Part time Opportunities – Various
Shifts Available. We’re looking for RN'S, HOUSEKEEPERS, CNA'S. We are looking for
caring professionals for various shifts at the hospice and at our patients’ homes. 100% Paid
benefits. Complete an application at 27200 Imperial Street, Bonita Springs.

Page 2 of 2
Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use.


Expansion Activities
Basic English Grammar, 3rd Edition

Chapter 13: Modals Part 2: Advice, Nescessity, Requests,
Suggestions

Activity: Cartoons
Materials needed: A selection of newspaper cartoons with the text whited
out, or images of people interacting in interesting situations. Prepare noncartoon images by drawing speech bubbles on them for each character in the
cartoon. An animal can be an interesting character with a thought bubble
instead of a speech bubble. The Cartoon Factory at
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/kids/games/ (scroll down halfway in the
center) offers many images that can be completed online and/or printed out.
Description: Using Summary Chart 13-8 of modal auxiliaries as a guide, students create the text
for cartoons. Hand out a few text-free cartoons to pairs of students and encourage them to use at
least one modal for each cartoon. Display or otherwise share all the cartoons at the end. An
alternative is to photocopy and use the same several cartoons for each pair and compare the
varieties of language used by each pair.
Here’s a sample using the targeted modals:

Hmm…I think
I might have a
little snack….

Oh no! I’d better get out of here!

Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use.


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