Tải bản đầy đủ

Microsoft exchange server 2013 inside out mailbox and high availability

spine = 1.3”

Conquer Mailbox administration—from
the inside out!
Focusing on the Mailbox server role, dive into Exchange Server
2013—and really put your enterprise messaging to work! This
supremely organized reference packs hundreds of timesaving
solutions, troubleshooting tips, and workarounds for managing
mailboxes and high availability. Discover how the experts manage
core operations and support tasks—and challenge yourself to
new levels of mastery.

• Prepare for installation or upgrade
• Master role-based access control (RBAC) fundamentals
• Create, manage, move, and archive mailboxes
• Implement email address policies
• Configure and manage distribution groups
• Understand Store components and functionality
• Deliver high availability through database availability groups

Inside OUT

For experienced Exchange
Server administrators

Foreword by Rajesh Jha

Corporate Vice President, Exchange
Server Group, Microsoft Corporation

About the Author

Tony Redmond is a Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP) and one of the
leading voices in the Exchange Server
community. He has two decades of experience with enterprise mail, focusing on
Exchange Server since version 4.0. As an
industry consultant, he guides customers
through Exchange Server deployment
and management, and he’s written 10
books.

(DAGs)

• Manage compliance, retention, mailbox search, and data loss

Microsoft Exchange Server 2013
Mailbox and High Availability

Microsoft Exchange Server
2013 Mailbox and High
Availability

Inside OUT
The ultimate, in-depth reference
Hundreds of timesaving solutions
Supremely organized, packed
with expert advice

prevention

• Use the Exchange Management Shell and cmdlets
• Administer public folder architecture



Inside
OUT

Also look for
Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 Inside Out:
Connectivity, Clients, and UM
9780735678378

Redmond

microsoft.com/mspress
ISBN: 978-0-7356-7858-3

U.S.A.$49.99
Canada $52.99
[Recommended]

Messaging/Microsoft Exchange Server

Celebrating 30 years!

Microsoft Exchange
Server 2013: Mailbox
and High Availability
Tony Redmond Award-winning author + Microsoft MVP


PUBLISHED BY
Microsoft Press
A Division of Microsoft Corporation
One Microsoft Way
Redmond, Washington 98052-6399
Copyright © 2013 by Tony Redmond
All rights reserved. No part of the contents of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any
means without the written permission of the publisher.
Library of Congress Control Number: 2013948703
ISBN: 978-0-7356-7858-3
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The example companies, organizations, products, domain names, email addresses, logos, people, places, and
events depicted herein are fictitious. No association with any real company, organization, product, domain name,
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Contents at a Glance

Chapter 1
Introducing Microsoft Exchange Server 2013. . . 1
Chapter 2
Installing Exchange 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Chapter 3
The Exchange Management Shell. . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Chapter 4
Role-based access control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Chapter 5
Mailbox management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Chapter 6
More about the Exchange Administration
Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
Chapter 7
Addressing Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333
Chapter 8
The Exchange 2013 Store. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387
Chapter 9
The Database Availability Group. . . . . . . . . . . . 457
Chapter 10
Moving mailboxes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 567
Chapter 11
Compliance management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 641
Chapter 12
Public folders and site mailboxes. . . . . . . . . . . 765


iii



Table of Contents



Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii
Errata & book support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii
We want to hear from you . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
Stay in touch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix

Chapter 1

Introducing Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Understanding development priorities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
The influence of The Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Exchange Online and Exchange development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Transition into the cloud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Exchange 2013 architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
The motivation to upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Evolving from earlier versions of Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Waiting for updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Fundamental questions before you upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Selecting the right Windows Server for Exchange 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Using virtualization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Preparing for Exchange 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
A word about transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
The test plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Testing for operational processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Testing for programming and customizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Updating earlier versions of Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Deploying earlier versions of Exchange servers alongside Exchange 2013 . . . . . . . . . 32
Exchange 2013 editions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Active Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Using the strong link between Exchange and Active Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
ADSIEdit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

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v


vi

Table of Contents

Useful utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MFCMAPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exchange Web Services Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Exchange 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 2

Installing Exchange 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Approaching the installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Types of Active Directory deployment that support Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preparing Active Directory for Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating the Exchange 2013 organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deploying an Exchange 2013 server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing UCMA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setup logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Uninstalling Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Repairing Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recovering a failed server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Versions, cumulative updates, and service packs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cumulative updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Version numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Object versions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reporting licenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Security groups and accounts Exchange creates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Namespace planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Self-signed certificates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Exchange 2013 CAS to handle connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The case for protocol-specific namespaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contemplating management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 3

37
38
40
41
43
45
47
49
50
53
53
56
58
61
61
63
64
67
69
70
73
77
77
79
80
81

The Exchange Management Shell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
How Exchange uses Windows PowerShell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Using remote Windows PowerShell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Connecting to remote PowerShell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Limiting user functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
EMS basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Command editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Handling information EMS returns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Selective output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Using common and user-defined variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Using PowerShell ISE with Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Identities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Piping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
OPATH filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Server-side and client-side filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Transcripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Bulk updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Calling scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117




Chapter 4

Table of Contents

vii

Execution policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Active Directory for PowerShell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the right scope for objects in a multi-domain forest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exploring useful EMS examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Looking for large folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Outputting a CSV file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a report in HTML . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Verbose PowerShell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controlling access to Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

118
119
120
122
123
124
125
127
129
129

Role-based access control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
RBAC basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Role groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scopes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with RBAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a new role group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maintaining role group membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Role group management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Role assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using role assignment policy to limit access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating roles for specific tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specific scopes for role groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Database scoping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Special roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unscoped roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Which role groups do I belong to? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assignment policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Implementing a split permissions model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figuring out RBAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
On to management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 5

132
136
139
141
143
145
149
151
152
153
155
157
158
159
160
162
163
166
167
168

Mailbox management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Seeking perfection halts progress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting EAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How EAC accesses Exchange data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing EAC columns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Naming conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Recipients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recipient filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exporting EAC information to CSV files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Some mysterious mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The need for mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Naming mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating new mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Completing mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

170
173
176
177
178
180
180
181
182
183
185
187
193


viii

Table of Contents

Bulk mailbox creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating new room and resource mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Default folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manipulating mailbox settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Automating mailbox settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What’s in a mailbox? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ready-to-go custom attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mailbox resources provisioning management agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting mailbox quotas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing or disabling mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reconnecting mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Discovery mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating additional discovery mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Health mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting mailbox permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mailbox delegation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Full Access permission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mailbox auto-mapping through Autodiscover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Opening another user’s mailbox with Outlook Web App . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sending messages on behalf of other users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Outlook delegate access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shared mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recalling messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moderated recipients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moderated groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Processing moderation requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moderated mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mail-enabled contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mail users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resource mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining custom properties for resource mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Providing policy direction to the Resource Booking Attendant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Processing meeting requests according to policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Equipment mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enough about mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 6

195
195
196
200
202
205
207
207
209
213
218
220
224
224
226
229
229
232
235
237
237
239
240
241
243
244
247
249
250
252
254
255
256
261
265
266

More about the Exchange Administration Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating new groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Group owners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Group expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Protected groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing group members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Security groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tracking group usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

267
269
270
275
277
278
281
284
285




Chapter 7

Table of Contents

ix

Allowing users to manage groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Room lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dynamic distribution groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
OPATH queries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating new dynamic distribution groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Validating query results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating dynamic groups with EMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using custom filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sharing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Certificate management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mail flow and rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Delivery reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Administrator searches for delivery reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using EMS to search delivery reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running EAC without an Exchange mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting diagnostics for Exchange servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
But what will you manage? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

286
298
300
300
302
305
306
308
313
313
318
320
322
327
329
330
332

Addressing Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333
Email address policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Email policy priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a new email address policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Focusing on certain recipients by using filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating email address policies with custom filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Address lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Address book policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ABPs and groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating and implementing an ABP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Offline Address Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The OAB and Outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How Exchange 2013 generates the Offline Address Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating and using customized OABs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hierarchical address book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MailTips and group metrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Client interaction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring MailTips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Custom MailTips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Multilingual custom MailTips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
OAB support for MailTips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The display or Details Templates Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The next step . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 8

333
334
337
341
343
345
348
350
351
357
359
362
367
371
373
376
377
378
380
381
381
382
386

The Exchange 2013 Store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387
Long live JET! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 388
Maximum database size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389
Sizing mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391


x

Table of Contents

Dealing with I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maintaining contiguity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The database schema . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exchange 2013 I/O improvements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Workers, controller, and memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managed Availability and the Managed Store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Database management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating new mailbox databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating mailbox databases after installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Backups and permanent removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Transaction logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Log sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Transaction log checksum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Transaction log I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The question of circular logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reserved logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Background maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Database checksums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Database defragmentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Database compaction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Page zeroing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Content maintenance tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Corrupt item detection and isolation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Protection against high latency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Protection against excessive database or log growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Debugging swelling databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Online repair cmdlets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rebuilding a database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using ESEUTIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Database usage statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mailbox assistants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
And now for something completely different . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 9

392
397
398
400
402
407
407
410
414
416
417
419
419
427
427
429
431
432
433
435
436
436
436
437
442
443
444
445
448
450
451
454
455

The Database Availability Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 457
Changes in high availability in Exchange 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Database portability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Database Availability Group basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The dependency on Windows clustering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Migrating an Exchange 2010 DAG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Active Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Automatic database transitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managed Availability and high availability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Best copy and server selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ACLL: Attempt copy last logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Transaction log replay: The foundation for DAG replication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Transaction log compression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

457
459
461
463
464
465
467
469
472
478
479
483




Chapter 10

Table of Contents

xi

Block mode replication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Transaction log truncation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Incremental resynchronization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Seeding a database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changes in message submission within a DAG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Day-to-day DAG management and operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Building the DAG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pre-staging the Cluster Name Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The role of the FSW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DAG task logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Crimson events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing DAG properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DAG networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cleaning up before creating database copies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using circular logging inside a DAG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding new database copies to a DAG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring database copies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reseeding a database copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding database copies with EMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using a lagged database copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Activating a mailbox database copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rebalancing database copies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performing a server switchover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AutoDatabaseMountDial and potential issues moving databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Activation blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving database locations within a DAG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing database copies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing servers from a DAG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Handling storage failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Datacenter Activation Coordination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Approaching DAG designs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How Exchange 2013 changes the resilience equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Building a DAG with Exchange Standard edition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Server maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stressed servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
On to protecting data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

484
486
487
489
489
489
494
497
499
502
502
504
506
510
510
514
517
523
525
525
533
534
536
539
542
544
546
548
549
551
552
558
560
562
565
566

Moving mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 567
The Mailbox Replication service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Asynchronous moving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Migration service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mailbox Replication service processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MRS and system resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preventing loss of data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating and managing migration batches with EAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using EMS with migration batches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

567
568
571
572
575
579
580
581
592


xii

Table of Contents

Reporting mailbox moves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Getting more information about a move . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing move report histories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing individual mailbox moves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning move priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moves and mailbox provisioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Handling move request errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking and altering move request status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clearing move requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Migration endpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling MRSProxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Planning mailbox moves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Suspending mailbox moves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ensuring high availability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MRS configuration file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mailbox import and export . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gaining permission through RBAC to execute mailbox import and export . . . . . . .
Planning the import of PST data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Importing and exporting mailbox data with EAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Importing and exporting mailbox data with EMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alerts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Time to comply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 11

595
597
599
605
607
607
607
609
610
611
612
614
615
619
621
623
624
626
629
632
638
640

Compliance management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 641
The joy of legal discovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Archive mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling archives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The default archive and retention policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using an archive mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disabling an archive mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Messaging records management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Types of retention tags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System tags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Designing a retention policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managed Folder Assistant and retention policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Naming retention tags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating retention tags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a retention policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Applying a retention policy to mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying a retention policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing retention policies for specific mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User interaction with retention policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting a retention policy on a folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing tags from policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a retention policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Upgrading from managed folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

642
645
647
652
655
656
657
657
662
663
665
666
668
673
677
681
681
684
685
687
688
688




Chapter 12

Table of Contents

xiii

How the Managed Folder Assistant implements retention policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Behind the scenes with the MFA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Retention date calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preserving information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Putting a mailbox on retention hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Putting a mailbox on litigation hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching mailbox content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
In-place holds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a new search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Retrieving discovered content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Examining search results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resource throttling for searches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How in-place holds work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using groups with searches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Executing searches with EMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What Exchange can search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Search syntaxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The value of the Recoverable Items structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The function of the Recoverable Items structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Improvements in Exchange 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Single-item recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Knowing what’s in Recoverable Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing quotas for Recoverable Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Auditing administrator actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The audit mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How administrator auditing happens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Auditing mailbox access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling mailboxes for auditing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing mailbox audit data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other compliance features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

689
691
693
696
698
699
701
703
708
716
720
724
726
728
730
731
733
736
737
737
739
743
745
746
748
749
750
754
757
759
763

Public folders and site mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 765
Public folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
New concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating public folder mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How many public folder mailboxes are needed? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controlling the root . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating public folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mail-enabling public folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving public folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Redirecting content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a public folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mobile access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Organizational forms library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Migration to modern public folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

765
766
767
770
774
776
779
783
785
786
786
787
787


Site mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How site mailboxes work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The life cycle of site mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Site mailbox provisioning policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Summarizing public folders and site mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

791
792
800
803
804
805

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 807

What do you think of this book? We want to hear from you!
Microsoft is interested in hearing your feedback so we can continually improve our books and learning
resources for you. To participate in a brief online survey, please visit:

microsoft.com/learning/booksurvey


Foreword for Exchange 2013 Inside Out books
Those seeking an in-depth tour of Exchange Server 2013 couldn’t ask for better guides
than Tony Redmond and Paul Robichaux. Tony and Paul have a relationship with the
Exchange team that goes back two decades, to the days of Exchange 4.0. Few people have
as much practical knowledge about Exchange, and even fewer have the teaching skills to
match. You are in good hands.
Over the past few years, we have seen significant changes in the way people communicate;
a growing number of devices, an explosion of information, increasingly complex compliance requirements, and a multigenerational workforce. This world of communication challenges has been accompanied by a shift toward cloud services. As we designed Exchange
2013, the Exchange team worked hard to build a product and service that address these
challenges. As you read these books, you’ll get an up-close look at the outcome of our
efforts.
Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 Inside Out: Mailbox and High Availability covers foundational topics such as the Exchange Store, role-based access control (RBAC), our simplified
approach to high availability, and the new public folder architecture. It also covers our
investments in eDiscovery and in-place hold. As you read, you’ll see how Exchange 2013
helps you achieve world-class reliability and provides a way to comply with internal and
regulatory compliance requirements without the need for third-party products.
Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 Inside Out: Connectivity, Clients, and UM explores the
technologies that give users anywhere access to their email, calendar, and contacts across
multiple devices. It also explains how to protect your email environment from spam, viruses,
and other threats and describes how Exchange 2013 can connect with Office 365 so you
can take advantage of the power of the cloud.
From our new building-block architecture to data loss prevention, there’s a lot to explore in
the newest version of Exchange. I hope that as you deploy and use Exchange 2013, you’ll
agree that this is an exciting and innovative release.
Enjoy!
Rajesh Jha
Corporate Vice President - Exchange
Microsoft Corporation


xv



Introduction
This book is for experienced Exchange administrators who want to get inside the soul of
Exchange Server 2013, the latest version of the Microsoft enterprise messaging server first
released in October 2012 and updated on a frequent basis since. You might learn how to
work with Exchange 2013 by reading this book, but I sincerely doubt that this will happen
simply because I have written it with experience in mind.
The book does not cover every possible topic relating to Exchange 2013. In fact, it focuses
primarily on the Mailbox server role. Let me explain why. After completing Microsoft
Exchange Server 2010 Inside Out (Microsoft Press, 2010), it became very clear that attempting to cover all of a complex product such as Exchange in any depth in just one book was
a fool’s errand. There are too many details to master, too much work to do, too much
information that can only be skimmed over to keep to a reasonable page count. The result
would probably be a book that weighs 2 kilos, spanning 1,400 pages that takes 2 years to
write. All in all, an unacceptable situation in both commercial and practical terms.
Paul Robichaux and I ran a number of Exchange 2010 Maestro seminars in the 2010–2011
period. Despite the infamous cockroach sandwich affair, the events were good fun, and
we enjoyed discussing the technology in some depth, even if we tended to ramble on at
times. Brian Desmond, an Active Directory MVP who did an excellent job of lab master and
­stand-in speaker when required, helped us. Because we worked well together and because
Paul has an excellent record of writing both books and articles, it seemed like a good idea
to consider a joint approach for Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 Inside Out. We arrived at
the basic idea quickly—we would split coverage into the two server roles. I’d write about
the Mailbox role and Paul took on client access, including all the various clients Exchange
supports, and unified messaging, which, strictly speaking, is part of an Exchange 2013
Mailbox server. However, Paul is an acknowledged expert in this space, and it would have
made no sense to have me write about a subject of which Paul is the master.
Because Exchange 2013 is an evolution of Exchange 2010, we decided to use Microsoft
Exchange Server 2010 Inside Out as the base for the new book. An evolution it might be,
but an extensive level of change at the detail level exists in Exchange 2013. The upshot is
that I’m not sure how much of that book remains in the current text—maybe 20 percent.
One thing I am glad of is that we did not rush to press after Exchange 2013 first appeared.
Given the amount of change that has occurred in updates from Microsoft since, a book that
describes the release to manufacturing (RTM) version of Exchange 2013 would have been
obsolete very soon after publication. We hope that these volumes will last longer.


xvii


xviiiIntroduction

I hope that you enjoy this book and that you’ll read it alongside Paul’s Microsoft Exchange
Server 2013 Inside Out: Clients, Connectivity, and UM. The two books really do go together.
Paul has scrutinized every word in this book and I have done the same for his. We therefore
share the blame for any error you might find.

Acknowledgments
I owe enormous thanks to the many people who agreed to look over chapters or portions of the book. Each has deep expertise in specific areas and all contributed greatly
to eradicating errors and increasing clarity. These folks include Sanjay Ramaswamy,
Jürgen Hasslauer, David Espinoza, William Rall, Todd Luttinen, Tim McMichael, Vineetha
Kalvakunta, Fred Monteiro da Cruz Filho, Kanika Ramji, Lokesh Bhoobalan, Astrid McClean,
Alfons Staerk, Kern Hardman, Andrew Friedman, Abram Jackson, and Scott Schnoll. Even if
they didn’t realize it, many of the Exchange MVPs played their part in improving the book
by prompting me to look into topics that I had forgotten to cover. I should also acknowledge the huge contribution made by my editor, Karen Szall. We fought many times about
page counts, content, and too many other topics to list here but always kept the project
moving.
I apologize sincerely if I have omitted to mention anyone who has contributed to making
the text of the book as accurate and as informative as possible.

Errata & book support
We’ve made every effort to ensure the accuracy of this book and its companion content. Any errors that have been reported since this book was published are listed on our
Microsoft Press site at oreilly.com:
http://aka.ms/ExIOv1/errata
If you find an error that is not already listed, you can report it to us through the same page.
If you need additional support, email Microsoft Press Book Support at
mspinput@microsoft.com.
Please note that product support for Microsoft software is not offered through the
addresses above.


Introduction
xix

We want to hear from you
At Microsoft Press, your satisfaction is our top priority, and your feedback our most valuable asset. Please tell us what you think of this book at:
http://www.microsoft.com/learning/booksurvey
The survey is short, and we read every one of your comments and ideas. Thanks in advance
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Stay in touch
Let's keep the conversation going! We're on Twitter: http://twitter.com/MicrosoftPress.



C HA PT E R 1

Introducing Microsoft Exchange Server
2013
Understanding development priorities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

Preparing for Exchange 2013. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

The influence of The Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5

Exchange 2013 editions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Exchange 2013 architecture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Active Directory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

The motivation to upgrade. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Useful utilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Selecting the right Windows Server for Exchange 2013. . 22

Installing Exchange 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

Using virtualization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

M

any users have worked with email for a long time now, spanning development
from its “green screen,” beginning when everyone used video terminals connected to a central computer to compose and send messages that were most
definitely text-only, to when many companies quite happily use cloud-based email, meaning that they connect to central computers over the Internet. Although the clients are very
different and the contents of the messages are much more varied, the rush to embrace
highly centralized services almost seems like a return to the mainframe-dominated past.
As good as cloud-based services are, the need still exists for on-premises deployments,
where servers, clients, and all the supporting infrastructure are firmly under the control of
an IT department. A new version of a popular software product such as Microsoft Exchange
Server 2013 generates different emotions for the different players who participate in the
cycle of product development, deployment, operations, and support, not to mention a
flurry of excited commentary from those who observe developments in the industry. This
book explains the impact of the release of Exchange Server 2013 for those who are involved
in Exchange deployment, operations, and support. Much of the insight into the product
comes from the other key players, the team that develops Exchange and keeps working to
improve it on a daily basis. They have their view about what’s important; most of the time
I agree with their position (if only after arguing until I understand where they are coming
from), and sometimes I disagree. You’ll see this dichotomy of views as you go through the
different topics presented in this book. I’ll begin by presenting the case for Exchange 2013
and explore what Microsoft wanted to accomplish in this release of the product.
Microsoft divides Exchange 2013 into two server roles: Mailbox (sometimes called backend) and Client Access Server (sometimes called CAS or front-end). This book is dedicated
to a discussion of the mailbox server role, although it does touch on the subject of the
CAS when necessary to maintain continuity or completeness in a discussion. A companion volume, Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 Inside Out: Connectivity, Clients, and UM by


1


2

Chapter 1  Introducing Microsoft Exchange Server 2013

Chapter 1

Paul Robichaux, covers the CAS in detail. Both books are intended to stand on their own
merits and do not depend on each other, but you can gain a more complete picture of
Exchange 2013 by reading both, which I hope you will do.
Microsoft hopes that the quality of Exchange 2013 merits its introduction and that customers consider the new and enhanced features to be compelling enough to warrant a fast
upgrade. In addition, Microsoft likes to see an improvement in its competitive situation,
something that is especially important in the new era of cloud-based services in which
Google in particular has proven to be a worthy competitor in both functionality and setting new expectations for customers for the price point that should be paid monthly per
mailbox and the service level that is delivered. Customers want a product that meets their
requirements and is easy to deploy and manage; one that isn’t too different from previous
versions; and deployment of which won’t cost an enormous amount in terms of personnel
effort and new hardware. Partners hope for new business, whether it’s an increase in product sales or an uptick in services revenue to help customers analyze, assess, and then decide
how best to use the new software. All this is true for Exchange 2013, which sits at the center
of a large ecosystem spanning 360 million deployed mailboxes (the number estimated by
the Radicati Group in 2011). The majority of these mailboxes remain on-premises, although
there is no doubt that erosion will occur over time as companies move to Office 365 and
other hosted offerings.

Understanding development priorities
It’s tough to drive innovation into a product that has been around for so long, and it’s
tough to satisfy all the different constituencies that use Exchange, from the small business
that deploys one or two servers to the world’s largest enterprises that support hundreds of
thousands of mailboxes. Each time Microsoft releases a new version of Exchange, it has to
include enough new stuff in the product to create a compelling case for an upgrade.
All development projects have priorities. Microsoft reveals its goals for each version of
Exchange when it meets with customers or makes presentations at major industry conferences, such as the return of the Microsoft Exchange Conference (MEC) in September 2012.
These goals include:
●●

Supporting a multigenerational workforce  The first generation of workers
that experienced email was in the 1980s. Each generation since has added its own
expectations of how email should work in the mix. The current multigenerational
workforce is more diverse and demanding and expects information to be integrated
and available through more devices than ever. Microsoft points to the way Exchange
2013 combines information from multiple sources (including LinkedIn and Facebook)
to present a unified view of personal contacts (“People”) and the way Smart Search
works from the way users collaborate to improve search results as evidence of how it
is providing better access to information.


Understanding development priorities

●●

●●

●●

●●

3

Providing an engaging experience  The evidence here often includes the
reworked user interfaces in Outlook 2013 and Outlook Web App, including support
for touch devices. Although some will enjoy features in the new client applications
(such as the way Outlook and Outlook Web App permit inline editing of replies to
messages), many users will continue to use earlier versions of Outlook because of the
difficulty and expense involved in deploying new software to desktops.
Improving integration with Microsoft SharePoint and Lync  Exchange 2010 can
store Lync conversations for individual users but has no real integration with SharePoint. Lync contacts can now be stored in Exchange 2013, and Lync archiving is subject to Exchange compliance features such as in-place hold. For SharePoint, Exchange
2013 introduces site mailboxes to bridge the gap between how people collaborate
through email and document authoring. Search capabilities are also enhanced by
using Search Foundation as a common platform across Exchange, SharePoint, and
Lync so that information can be located in all repositories. These features depend on
SharePoint 2013, Lync 2013, and Outlook 2013 to provide the necessary points of
integration and user interface.
Meeting evolving compliance needs  Microsoft made a huge investment to provide a broad range of compliance features such as archive mailboxes and retention
policies in Exchange 2010. Real-life experience has helped Microsoft refine these features. Search is improved as previously described, and retention holds are expanded
to allow multiple query-based holds to be placed on user mailboxes when essential
information must be retained. In addition, the new data loss prevention (DLP) feature helps users exert better control over important forms of data that often travel in
email, such as credit card information.
Providing a resilient solution  There’s no doubt that the introduction of native
high-availability features embodied in the Database Availability Group (DAG) was the
major success story of Exchange 2010. Unlike other features, high availability is based
on the heart of Exchange, the Store databases. Experience revealed how automation
of the resolution of failure conditions could be improved, and new capabilities were
introduced to make it easier to introduce and manage truly resilient mailbox servers.
Making the CAS a more stateless server also helps because these servers can now be
moved into and out of operational environments more easily. In addition, because a
version dependency no longer exists between front-end (CAS) and back-end (Mailbox) servers, it should be possible to update servers of one type to a new version of
Exchange without updating the others at the same time.

Because Exchange 2013 builds on the architecture and priorities established for Exchange
2010, it is valuable to review the priorities for that release in the context of Exchange
2013. Because you know how Exchange 2010 has been used in the intervening period,
you can assess how the development priorities turned out in reality and how the different

Chapter 1




4

Chapter 1  Introducing Microsoft Exchange Server 2013

investments in technology made several years ago have developed in Exchange 2013.
When it was developing Exchange 2010, Microsoft concentrated on three major areas:
Chapter 1

●●

●●

●●

Increasing operational flexibility through easier deployment, higher availability, and
simpler administration. Simplicity comes about in many areas, including the reduction in server roles to just two: the Mailbox server and the CAS. Administration is
simplified in that you now have a single management console: the browser-based
Exchange Administration Center (EAC). Microsoft Windows PowerShell continues to
provide the basis for automation. After a slow start, the Exchange community has
truly embraced Windows PowerShell, and the number of useful scripts that are shared
on the Internet is growing at a rapid rate.
Streamlining communications by supporting larger, better-organized mailboxes;
investing further in unified communications; and allowing users to work more easily
together no matter which device or client they use. Exchange 2010 focused on 10-GB
mailboxes with up to 100,000 items in a folder; Exchange 2013 considers a world in
which a 100-GB mailbox and 1,000,000 items in a folder might be common.
Delivering greater visibility and control with protected communications, in-built compliance and archiving functionality, and better reporting and management alerts. A
large range of compliance features, including archive mailboxes and retention policies, was introduced in Exchange 2010 to assist companies in complying with various legal and regulatory directives. As explained earlier, features such as discovery
searches are refined further in Exchange 2013 and enhanced in new ways such as the
provision of site mailboxes, which also create a closer connection between SharePoint
and Exchange. The DLP feature comes from experience gained with transport rules
and MailTips to enable organizations to define and implement policies to control the
transmission of sensitive information through email.

This is not an exhaustive list of the improvements in Exchange 2013. For example, the
advent of modern public folders is welcome because it addresses a nagging problem that
has existed in Exchange for at least a decade. This book explores the challenges of migrating existing public folder deployments to the new infrastructure in Chapter 12, “Site mailboxes and public folders.”
In scanning the development priorities for Exchange 2013, it’s interesting that many of the
same points could have been made about Exchange 2010. Perhaps it’s good that development priorities have remained reasonably consistent, or maybe the same influences that
guided Microsoft to make these the priority areas for Exchange 2010 have not abated.
These areas of investment have to work as well for hosted environments as they do when
deployed onsite. Security and privacy are big challenges for hosted environments because
all communications have to be routed from a customer’s own network across the Internet


The influence of The Service

5

to a data center Microsoft or another provider hosts. It’s not just a matter of transporting
messages anymore; directory synchronization and administrative commands have to flow
as easily as messages, and everything has to work in dedicated environments and in the
multitenant shared environments that are becoming more common because of their cost
efficiencies. The debate that erupted following the PRISM controversy in mid-2013 is an
example of the sensitivities that exist around security and privacy.
Many of the changes in Exchange 2013 are highly influenced by recent developments
in hardware. For example, managed availability imposes a certain overhead on a server
because it consumes resources to verify that components are functioning correctly. The
overhead might have been a problem for older servers but should not be an issue for the
kind of multicore servers available now. Exchange trades memory for disk I/O in a number
of versions, based on the principle that memory is becoming cheaper, and it’s better to
cache data than to go to disk. Exchange 2013 uses larger caches than Exchange 2010, and
this, along with the other changes made to reduce or manage I/O better, make it feasible
to deploy mailbox databases on low-cost, high-capacity drives. Hardware will continue to
evolve, and the Exchange developers keep a keen eye on the possibilities enabled by new
capabilities. They also know that how Exchange uses hardware resources has to be as efficient as possible to make it an economic platform for cloud deployments, whose major selling point is often a low monthly cost per mailbox.
At the time of writing, Exchange has been under development for nearly 20 years, and its
source code encompasses some tens of millions of lines of code. At one time, the code base
amounted to 21 million lines, but a rewrite of the Exchange Information Store into managed code for Exchange 2013 eliminated a large amount of redundant code that handled
conditions that are no longer valid. No engineering group stays constant over such an
extended period. Different engineering leadership, internal Microsoft politics, and competitive pressure have all contributed to elevating different priorities for the product over the
years. Working in a world of cloud services is just the latest influence on Exchange.

The influence of The Service
Since Exchange 2010, Microsoft has had to walk a thin line to develop software that can
run as well in a traditional on-premises deployment as in its Office 365 cloud service. Companies have offered hosted Exchange services for years, and many continue to compete
successfully against Office 365 with products based on Exchange 2013. The big difference is
that Microsoft now runs a massively scalable cloud service that exerts a huge influence over
the engineering roadmap. Microsoft is more likely to create new functionality if it is important to Exchange Online, the email component of the Microsoft Office 365 cloud platform,
than if it is important to a few on-premises customers. This is the downside of the cloud for
on-premises customers; the upside is that Microsoft gains enormously from the experience

Chapter 1




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