Tải bản đầy đủ

Data center handbook

www.it-ebooks.info


www.it-ebooks.info


DATA CENTER HANDBOOK

www.it-ebooks.info


www.it-ebooks.info


DATA CENTER HANDBOOK
Hwaiyu Geng, P.E.
Amica Association
Palo Alto, CA, USA

www.it-ebooks.info



Copyright © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved
Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey
Published simultaneously in Canada
No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical,
photocopying, recording, scanning, or otherwise, except as permitted under Section 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, without either the
prior written permission of the Publisher, or authorization through payment of the appropriate per-copy fee to the Copyright Clearance Center, Inc., 222
Rosewood Drive, Danvers, MA 01923, (978) 750-8400, fax (978) 750-4470, or on the web at www.copyright.com. Requests to the Publisher for permission
should be addressed to the Permissions Department, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 111 River Street, Hoboken, NJ 07030, (201) 748-6011, fax (201) 748-6008, or
online at http://www.wiley.com/go/permission.
Limit of Liability/Disclaimer of Warranty: While the publisher and author have used their best efforts in preparing this book, they make no representations
or warranties with respect to the accuracy or completeness of the contents of this book and specifically disclaim any implied warranties of merchantability or
fitness for a particular purpose. No warranty may be created or extended by sales representatives or written sales materials. The advice and strategies
contained herein may not be suitable for your situation. You should consult with a professional where appropriate. Neither the publisher nor author shall be
liable for any loss of profit or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.
For general information on our other products and services or for technical support, please contact our Customer Care Department within the United States at
(800) 762-2974, outside the United States at (317) 572-3993 or fax (317) 572-4002.
Wiley also publishes its books in a variety of electronic formats. Some content that appears in print may not be available in electronic formats. For more
information about Wiley products, visit our web site at www.wiley.com.
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data:
Data center handbook / edited by Hwaiyu Geng.
  pages cm
  Includes bibliographical references and index.
  ISBN 978-1-118-43663-9 (cloth)
1.  Electronic data processing departments–Design and construction–Handbooks, manuals, etc. 
2.  Electronic data processing departments–Security measures–Handbooks, manuals, etc.  I.  Geng, Hwaiyu.
  TH4311.D368 2015
 004.068′4–dc23
2014013900
Printed in the United States of America

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

www.it-ebooks.info


To “Our Mothers Who Cradle the World,” and To “Our Earth Who Gives Us Life.”

www.it-ebooks.info



www.it-ebooks.info


Brief Contents

CONTRIBUTORS

xxi

PREFACE

xxiii

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

xxv

TECHNICAL ADVISORY BOARD

xxvii

CHAPTER ORGANIZATION

xxix

PART I  Data CENTER Overview and Strategic Planning

1

1 Data Centers—Strategic Planning, Design, Construction, and Operations

3

Hwaiyu Geng

2Energy and Sustainability in Data Centers

15

William J. Kosik

3 Hosting or Colocation Data Centers

47

Chris Crosby and Chris Curtis

4 Modular Data Centers: Design, Deployment,
and Other Considerations

59

Wade Vinson, Matt Slaby, and Ian Levine

5 Data Center Site Search and Selection

89

Ken Baudry

6 Data Center Financial Analysis, ROI and TCO

103

Liam Newcombe

7Overview of Data Centers in China

139

Zhe Liu, Jingyi Hu, Hongru Song, Yutao Yang, and Haibo Li

8Overview of Data Centers in Korea

153

Minseok Kwon, Mingoo Kim, and Hanwook Bae
vii

www.it-ebooks.info


viii

Brief Contents

PART II  Data Center Design and Construction
9 Architecture Design: Data Center Rack Floor Plan
and Facility Layout Design

161
163

Phil Isaak

10 Mechanical Design in Data Centers

183

John Weale

11Electrical Design in Data Centers

217

Jay S. Park and Sarah Hanna

12Fire Protection and Life Safety Design in Data Centers

229

Sean S. Donohue

13Structural Design in Data Centers: Natural
Disaster Resilience

245

David Bonneville and Robert Pekelnicky

14 Data Center Telecommunications Cabling

257

Alexander Jew

15 Dependability Engineering for Data Center Infrastructures

275

Malik Megdiche

16 Particulate and Gaseous Contamination
in Data Centers

307

Taewon Han

17 Computational Fluid Dynamics Applications
in Data Centers

313

Mark Seymour

18Environmental Control of Data Centers

343

Veerendra Mulay

19 Data Center Project Management and Commissioning

359

Lynn Brown

PART III  Data Center Technology

389

20 Virtualization, Cloud, SDN, and SDDC
in Data Centers

391

Omar Cherkaoui and Ramesh Menon

21 Green Microprocessor and Server Design

401

Guy AlLee

22Energy Efficiency Requirements in Information
Technology Equipment Design
Joe Prisco and Jay Dietrich

www.it-ebooks.info

419


Brief Contents

23Raised Floor versus Overhead Cooling in Data Centers

429

Vali Sorell

24 Hot Aisle versus Cold Aisle Containment

441

Dave Moody

25Free Cooling Technologies in Data Centers

465

Nicholas H. Des Champs and Keith Dunnavant

26Rack-Level Cooling and Cold Plate Cooling

479

Henry Coles, Steve Greenberg, and Phil Hughes

27 Uninterruptible Power Supply System

495

Chris Loeffler and Ed Spears

28 Using Direct Current Network in Data Centers

523

Sofia Bergqvist

29Rack PDU for Green Data Centers

533

Ching-I Hsu

30Renewable and Clean Energy for Data Centers

559

William Kao

31Smart Grid-Responsive Data Centers

577

Girish Ghatikar, Mary Ann Piette, and Venkata Vish Ganti

PART IV  Data Center Operations and Management

593

32 Data Center Benchmark Metrics

595

William J. Kosik

33 Data Center Infrastructure Management

601

Mark Harris

34 Computerized Maintenance Management System in Data Centers

619

Peter Sacco

PART V 

Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity

35 Data Center Disaster Recovery and High Availability

639
641

Chris Gabriel

36 Lessons Learned from Natural Disasters and Preparedness
of Data Centers

659

Hwaiyu Geng and Masatoshi Kajimoto

Index669

www.it-ebooks.info

ix


www.it-ebooks.info


Contents

CONTRIBUTORS

xxi

PREFACE

xxiii

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

xxv

TECHNICAL ADVISORY BOARD

xxvii

CHAPTER ORGANIZATION

xxix

PART I Data CENTER Overview and Strategic Planning

1

1 Data Centers—Strategic Planning, Design, Construction, and Operations

3

Hwaiyu Geng

1.1Introduction, 3
1.2 Data Center Vision and Roadmap,  6
1.3Strategic Location Plan,  7
1.4Sustainable Design, 8
1.5 Best Practices and Emerging Technologies,  10
1.6Operations Management and Disaster Management,  10
1.7 Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery,  12
1.8Conclusion, 12
References, 13
Further Reading,  14
2Energy and Sustainability in Data Centers

15

William J. Kosik

2.1Introduction, 15
2.2Flexible Facilities—Modularity in Data Centers,  18
2.3Water Use, 21
2.4 Proper Operating Temperature and Humidity,  21
2.5 Avoiding Common Planning Errors,  23
2.6 Cooling System Concepts,  26
2.7 Building Envelope and Energy Use,  28
2.8 Air Management and Containment Strategies,  30
2.9Electrical System Efficiency,  32
xi

www.it-ebooks.info


xii

Contents

2.10Energy Use of IT Equipment,  33
2.11 Leveraging IT and Facilities,  37
2.12 Determining Data Center Energy Use Effectiveness,  39
2.13 Private Industry and Government Energy Efficiency Programs,  42
2.14 USGBC—LEED Adaptations for Data Centers,  42
2.15 Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency,  42
2.16Industry Consortium—Recommendations for Measuring and
Reporting Overall Data Center Efficiency,  42
2.17Strategies for Operations Optimization,  44
References, 44
Further Reading,  44
3 Hosting or Colocation Data Centers

47

Chris Crosby and Chris Curtis

3.1Introduction, 47
3.2 Hosting, 47
3.3 Colocation (Wholesale),  48
3.4Types of Data Centers,  48
3.5Scaling Data Centers,  54
3.6Selecting and Evaluating DC Hosting and Wholesale Providers,  54
3.7 Build versus Buy,  54
3.8Future Trends,  56
3.9 Conclusion, 57
Further Reading,  57
Sources for Data Center Industry News and Trends,  57
4 Modular Data Centers: Design, Deployment, and Other
Considerations59
Wade Vinson, Matt Slaby, and Ian Levine

4.1 Modular Data Center Definition,  59
4.2 MDC Benefits and Applications,  59
4.3 Modularity Scalability Planning,  61
4.4 MDC Anatomy,  62
4.5Site Preparation, Installation, Commissioning,  80
4.6 How to Select an MDC Vendor,  85
4.7External Factors,  86
4.8Future Trend and Conclusion,  86
Further Reading,  87
5 Data Center Site Search and Selection

89

Ken Baudry

5.1Introduction, 89
5.2Site Searches Versus Facility Searches,  89
5.3 Globalization and the Speed of Light,  90
5.4The Site Selection Process,  93
5.5Industry Trends Affecting Site Selection,  101
Further Reading,  102
6 Data Center Financial Analysis, ROI and TCO
Liam Newcombe

6.1Introduction to Financial Analysis, Return on Investment,
and Total Cost of Ownership,  103

www.it-ebooks.info

103


Contents

6.2Financial Measures of Cost and Return,  109
6.3 Complications and Common Problems,  116
6.4 A Realistic Example,  126
6.5 Choosing to Build, Reinvest, Lease, or Rent,  135
Further Reading,  137
7Overview of Data Centers in China

139

Zhe Liu, Jingyi Hu, Hongru Song, Yutao Yang, and Haibo Li

7.1Introduction, 139
7.2 Policies, Laws, Regulations, and Standards,  141
7.3Standards, 145
7.4 Development Status of China’s Data Centers,  147
7.5Energy Efficiency Status,  149
7.6 Development Tendency,  150
References, 151
8Overview of Data Centers in Korea

153

Minseok Kwon, Mingoo Kim, and Hanwook Bae

8.1Introduction, 153
8.2 Korean Government Organizations for Data Center,  154
8.3 Codes and Standards,  154
8.4 Data Center Design and Construction,  155
8.5 Data Center Market,  159
8.6 Conclusion, 160
References, 160
PART II  Data Center Design and Construction
9 Architecture Design: Data Center Rack Floor Plan
and Facility Layout Design

161
163

Phil Isaak

9.1Introduction, 163
9.2Overview of Rack and Cabinet Design,  163
9.3Space and Power Design Criteria,  166
9.4 Pathways, 169
9.5 Coordination with Other Systems,  170
9.6 Computer Room Design,  174
9.7 Modular Design,  177
9.8 CFD Modeling,  178
9.9 Data Center Space Planning,  179
9.10Conclusion, 181
Further Reading,  181
10 Mechanical Design in Data Centers

183

John Weale

10.1Introduction, 183
10.2 Key Design Criteria,  183
10.3 Mechanical Design Process,  186
10.4 Data Center Considerations in Selecting Key
Components, 203

www.it-ebooks.info

xiii


xiv

Contents

10.5 Primary Design Options,  206
10.6 Current Best Practices,  211
10.7Future Trends, 214
References, 215
Further Reading,  215
11Electrical Design in Data Centers

217

Jay S. Park and Sarah Hanna

11.1Uptime, 217
11.2Electrical Equipment to Deploy,  217
11.3Electrical Design, 217
11.4Availability, 222
11.5Determining Success, 227
Appendix 11.A,  228
Further Reading,  228
12Fire Protection and Life Safety Design in Data Centers

229

Sean S. Donohue

12.1Fire Protection Fundamentals,  229
12.2 AHJs, Codes, and Standards,  230
12.3 Local Authorities, National Codes, and Standards,  230
12.4Life Safety, 231
12.5 Passive Fire Protection,  233
12.6 Active Fire Protection/Suppression,  234
12.7 Detection, Alarm, and Signaling,  239
12.8Fire Protection Design,  242
References, 243
13Structural Design in Data Centers: Natural Disaster Resilience

245

David Bonneville and Robert Pekelnicky

13.1Introduction, 245
13.2 Building Design Considerations,  246
13.3Earthquakes, 248
13.4Hurricanes, Tornadoes, and Other Windstorms, 251
13.5Snow and Rain,  252
13.6Flood and Tsunami, 253
13.7 Comprehensive Resiliency Strategies,  254
References, 255
14 Data Center Telecommunications Cabling

257

Alexander Jew

14.1 Why Use Data Center Telecommunications Cabling
Standards?, 257
14.2Telecommunications Cabling Standards Organizations,  259
14.3 Data Center Telecommunications Cabling Infrastructure
Standards, 259
14.4Telecommunications Spaces and Requirements,  262
14.5Structured Cabling Topology, 264
14.6 Cable Types and Maximum Cable Lengths,  267
14.7 Cabinet and Rack Placement (Hot Aisles and Cold Aisles),  269
14.8 Cabling and Energy Efficiency,  270

www.it-ebooks.info


Contents

14.9 Cable Pathways,  271
14.10 Cabinets and Racks,  272
14.11 Patch Panels and Cable Management,  272
14.12Reliability Levels and Cabling,  272
14.13 Conclusion and Trends,  273
Further Reading,  273
15 Dependability Engineering for Data Center Infrastructures

275

Malik Megdiche

15.1Introduction, 275
15.2 Dependability Theory,  276
15.3System Dysfunctional Analysis,  283
15.4 Application to Data Center Dependability,  297
Reference, 305
Further Reading,  305
16 Particulate and Gaseous Contamination in Data Centers

307

Taewon Han

16.1Introduction, 307
16.2Standards and Guidelines,  307
16.3 Airborne Contamination,  309
16.4 A Conventional Solution,  309
16.5 Conclusions and Future Trends,  311
Acknowledgment, 311
References, 312
Further Reading,  312
17 Computational Fluid Dynamics Applications in Data Centers

313

Mark Seymour

17.1Introduction, 313
17.2Fundamentals of CFD,  313
17.3 Applications of CFD for Data Centers,  321
17.4 Modeling the Data Center,  325
17.5 Potential Additional Benefits of a CFD/Virtual Facility Model,  340
17.6The Future of Virtual Facility Models,  341
References, 341
18Environmental Control of Data Centers

343

Veerendra Mulay

18.1 Data Center Power Trends,  343
18.2Thermal Management of Data Centers,  343
18.3 Cooling System Design and Control,  346
18.4 Performance Metrics,  352
References, 353
19 Data Center Project Management and Commissioning
Lynn Brown

19.1Introduction, 359
19.2 Project Management,  359
19.3 Commissioning, 367

www.it-ebooks.info

359

xv


xvi

Contents

19.4 Bidding Phase Tasks,  376
19.5 Acceptance Phase Tasks,  378
19.6 LEED-Required Commissioning Tasks,  381
19.7 Minimum Commissioning Tasks,  382
19.8 Commissioning Team Members,  383
19.9 Data Center Trends,  386
19.10Conclusion, 387
Further Reading,  387
PART III  Data Center Technology

389

20 Virtualization, Cloud, SDN, and SDDC in Data Centers

391

Omar Cherkaoui and Ramesh Menon

20.1Introduction, 391
20.2 Virtualization in Data Centers,  392
20.3 Cloud as an Extension of the Data Center,  393
20.4Networking in Data Center,  394
20.5SDN, 396
20.6SDDC, 398
20.7Roadmap to Cloud-Enabled Data Center,  398
References, 400
Further Reading,  400
21 Green Microprocessor and Server Design

401

Guy AlLee

21.1Introduction, 401
21.2 Microprocessor, 403
21.3Server, 407
21.4 Motherboard, 409
21.5Software, 413
21.6 Benchmarks, 415
21.7 Conclusions, 416
Further Reading,  417
22Energy Efficiency Requirements in Information Technology
Equipment Design

419

Joe Prisco and Jay Dietrich

22.1Introduction, 419
22.2 Computer Servers,  421
22.3Storage Systems,  425
22.4 Uninterruptable Power Systems,  426
22.5Networking Equipment,  427
22.6Future Trends in Product Energy Efficiency Requirements,  427
References, 428
Further Reading,  428
23Raised Floor versus Overhead Cooling in Data Centers
Vali Sorell

23.1Introduction, 429
23.2 History of Raised Floor versus Overhead Air Distribution,  429
23.3 Air Delivery Methodology as it Relates to Containment,  430

www.it-ebooks.info

429


Contents

23.4 Airflow Dynamics,  430
23.5 Under-floor Air Distribution,  433
23.6Overhead Air Distribution,  437
23.7 Conclusion, 439
References, 439
Further Reading,  439
24 Hot Aisle versus Cold Aisle Containment

441

Dave Moody

24.1Executive Summary,  441
24.2 Containment: The Airflow Architecture Models,  441
24.3Return Air Temperature Trends in HAC and CAC,  444
24.4Run- or Ride-Through Impact of Higher RAT,  446
24.5Single-Geometry Passive Chimney Ducts as Part
of HAC,  448
24.6 Psychological Impacts of Higher RAT,  450
24.7 Cooling System Airflow and Fan Power,  453
24.8Redundancy and Cooling Unit Location Impact,  459
24.9Impact on Conditions for Peripheral Equipment in
the Data Center Outside any of the HAC or
CAC Zone(s),  461
24.10Impact on Economizer Operation Time Periods During
Cooler Outside Ambient Temperatures,  462
24.11 Conclusion and Future Trends,  463
References, 464
Further Reading,  464
25Free Cooling Technologies in Data Centers

465

Nicholas H. Des Champs and Keith Dunnavant

25.1Introduction, 465
25.2 Using Properties of Ambient Air to Cool
a Data Center,  466
25.3Economizer Thermodynamic Process and Schematic
of Equipment Layout,  466
25.4 Comparative Potential Energy Savings and Required
Trim Mechanical Refrigeration,  475
25.5 Conventional Means for Cooling Datacom
Facilities, 478
References, 478
Further Reading,  478
26Rack-Level Cooling and Cold Plate Cooling

479

Henry Coles, Steve Greenberg, and Phil Hughes

26.1Introduction, 479
26.2Rack-Level Cooling Types,  482
26.3Rack-Level Cooler Selection and Installation,  485
26.4 Conclusion and Future Trends,  486
26.5Rack-Level Cooling Using Cold Plates,  486
26.6 Conclusions and Future Trends,  492
References, 493
Further Reading,  493

www.it-ebooks.info

xvii


xviii

Contents

27 Uninterruptible Power Supply System

495

Chris Loeffler and Ed Spears

27.1Introduction, 495
27.2 Principle of UPS and Application,  496
27.3 Considerations in Selecting UPS,  504
27.4Reliability and Redundancy,  507
27.5 Alternate Energy Sources: AC and DC,  512
27.6 UPS Preventive Maintenance Requirements,  516
27.7 UPS Management and Control,  519
27.8Conclusion and Trends, 520
Reference, 520
Further Reading,  520
28 Using Direct Current Network in Data Centers

523

Sofia Bergqvist

28.1Introduction, 523
28.2Edison’s Revenge, 523
28.3 Data Center Power Design,  525
28.4 Why Use the DC System in Data Centers,  526
28.5Examples of DC Data Centers in Operation,  531
28.6Future Trends and Conclusions,  532
Acknowledgments, 532
References, 532
Further Reading,  532
29Rack PDU for Green Data Centers

533

Ching-I Hsu

29.1Introduction, 533
29.2Fundamentals and Principles,  534
29.3Elements of the System,  540
29.4 Considerations for Planning and Selecting Rack PDUs,  548
29.5Future Trends for Rack PDUs,  555
Further Reading,  557
30Renewable and Clean Energy for Data Centers

559

William Kao

30.1Introduction, 559
30.2Renewable Energy Basics,  560
30.3Renewable Energy Types, 560
30.4 Alternative Energy: Fuel Cell,  569
30.5Case studies, 573
30.6Summary and Future Trends,  575
References, 576
Further Reading,  576
31Smart Grid-Responsive Data Centers

577

Girish Ghatikar, Mary Ann Piette, and Venkata Vish Ganti

31.1Introduction and Context for Grid-Responsive Data Centers,  577
31.2Smart Grid and DR Applications in the United States,  579
31.3Site Infrastructure Control System Technologies,  581

www.it-ebooks.info


Contents

31.4IT Infrastructure Virtualization Technologies,  582
31.5 DR Opportunities, Challenges,
and Automation Considerations,  582
31.6 Data Centers with DR Provisions,  583
31.7 AutoDR Using Open Standards,  585
31.8 Grid-Distributed Data Centers and Networks,  586
31.9Summary of DR Strategies,  587
31.10 Challenges to Grid-Responsive Data Centers,  587
31.11 U.S. Policies Governing Smart
Grid Emerging Technologies,  588
31.12The Energy Independence
and Security Act of 2007,  588
31.13State Policies for Smart
Grid Advancement,  589
31.14 Conclusions and Next Steps,  589
Acknowledgments, 591
References, 591
Further Reading,  592
PART IV  Data Center Operations and Management

593

32 Data Center Benchmark Metrics

595

William J. Kosik

32.1Introduction, 595
32.2Origin and Application of PUE as a Metric,  595
32.3 Metrics Used in Data Center Assessments,  597
32.4 Green Grid’s xUE Metrics,  597
32.5Rack Cooling Index and Return Temperature Index,  598
32.6 Additional Industry Metrics,  598
32.7European Commission Code of Conduct,  598
32.8International Telecommunication Union,  599
32.9 Conclusion, 599
Further Reading,  599
33 Data Center Infrastructure Management

601

Mark Harris

33.1 What is Data Center Infrastructure Management?,  601
33.2Triggers for DCIM Acquisition and Deployment,  604
33.3 What are the Modules of a DCIM Solution?,  606
33.4The DCIM System Itself. What to Expect and Plan for,  611
33.5 Critical Success Factors when Implementing a DCIM System,  614
33.6Future Trends in DCIM,  616
33.7 Conclusion, 617
References, 617
Further Reading,  617
34 Computerized Maintenance Management System in Data Centers
Peter Sacco

34.1Introduction, 619
34.2 CMMS Basics,  620
34.3 CMMS Modules,  620

www.it-ebooks.info

619

xix


xx

Contents

34.4 Considerations in Selecting CMMS,  632
34.5Conclusion, 637
34.6Trends, 637
Further Reading,  638
Part V  Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity

639

35 Data Center Disaster Recovery and High Availability

641

Chris Gabriel

35.1Introduction, 641
35.2The Evolution of the Data Center and Data Center Risk,  642
35.3 Physical Data Center Design and Redundancy: Tiers and N+ What?,  649
35.4 Virtualization Brings Out-of-the-Box DR Survivability,  652
35.5 DR and Cloud,  656
References, 657
Further Reading,  657
36 Lessons Learned from Natural Disasters and Preparedness
of Data Centers

659

Hwaiyu Geng and Masatoshi Kajimoto

36.1Introduction, 659
36.2 Design for Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery,  659
36.3Natural Disasters, 660
36.4The 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake,  660
36.5The 2012 Eastern U.S. Coast Superstorm Sandy,  663
36.6Conclusions, 666
References, 666
Further Reading,  666
Index669

www.it-ebooks.info


Contributors

Guy AlLee,  Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, OR, USA

Hwaiyu Geng, P.E., Amica Association, Palo Alto, CA,
USA

Hanwook Bae,  Samsung SDS, Seoul, South Korea
Ken Baudry, P.E.,  K.J Baudry, Inc., Atlanta, GA, USA
Sofia Bergqvist,  IBM Corporation, Stockholm, Sweden
David Bonneville, P.E., S.E., Degenkolb Engineers,
San Francisco, CA, USA
Lynn Brown, P.E., LEED AP,
Engineering, Austin, TX, USA

QCxP, Encotech

Omar Cherkaoui, Ph.D.,  University of Quebec à Montréal
(UQÀM), Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Henry Coles, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,
Berkeley, CA, USA
Chris Crosby,  Compass Datacenters, Dallas, TX, USA
Chris Curtis,  Compass Datacenters, Dallas, TX, USA
Nicolas H. Des Champs, Ph.D., Munters Corporation,
Buena Vista, VA, USA
Jay Dietrich, Distinguished Engineer, IBM Corporation,
Essex Junction, VT, USA
Sean S. Donohue, P.E.,  Hughes Associates, Inc., Colorado
Springs, CO, USA

Girish Ghatikar,  Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,
Berkeley, CA, USA
Steve Greenberg,  Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,
Berkeley, CA, USA
Taewon Han, Ph.D., Rutgers, The State University of
New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, USA
Sarah Hanna, MSEE,  Facebook, Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA
Mark Harris,  Nlyte Software, San Mateo, CA, USA
Ching-I Hsu, Ph.D.,  Raritan, Inc., Somerset, NJ, USA
Jingyi Hu, China Electronics Standardization Institute,
Beijing, China
Phil Hughes, Clustered Systems Company, Inc., Santa
Clara, CA, USA
Phil Isaak, P.E., P.Eng., DCDC, RCDD  Isaak Technology,
Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA
Alexander Jew,  J&M Consultants, Inc., San Francisco, CA,
USA
Masatoshi Kajimoto,  ISACA, Tokyo, Japan

Keith Dunnavant, P.E.,  Munters Corporation, Buena Vista,
VA, USA

William Kao, Ph.D.,  University of California Santa Cruz,
Silicon Valley Extension, Santa Clara, CA, USA

Chris Gabriel,  Logicalis Group, London, UK

Mingoo Kim, Ph.D.,  Samsung SDS, Seoul, South Korea

Venkata Vish Ganti,  Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,
Berkeley, CA, USA

William J. Kosik, P.E., CEM, LEED AP, BEMP, HewlettPackard Company, Chicago, IL, USA

xxi

www.it-ebooks.info


xxii

Contributors

Minseok Kwon,  Samsung SDS, Seoul, South Korea

Joe Prisco,  IBM Corporation, Rochester, MN, VT, USA

Ian Levine,  Hewlett-Packard Company, Albany, NY, USA

Peter Sacco,  PTS Data Center Solution, Inc., Oakland, NJ,
USA

Haibo Li, China Electronics Standardization Institute,
Beijing, China

Mark Seymour,  Future Facilities Limited, London, UK

Zhe Liu, China Electronics Standardization Institute,
Beijing, China

Matt Slaby, Hewlett-Packard Company, Houston, TX,
USA

Chris Loeffler,  Eaton, Raleigh, NC, USA

Hongru Song,  China Electronics Standardization Institute,
Beijing, China

Malik Megdiche, Ph.D.,  Schneider Electric, Grenoble, France
Ramesh Menon,  IBM Corporation, Gaithersburg, MD, USA
Dave Moody,  Schneider Electric ITB, O’Fallon, MO, USA
Veerendra Mulay, Ph.D.,  Facebook, Menlo Park, CA, USA
Liam Newcombe,  Romonet, London, UK
Jay S. Park P.E.,  Facebook, Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA
Robert Peckelnicky, P.E., S.E., Degenkolb Engineers,
­San Francisco, CA, USA
Mary Ann Piette,  Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,
Berkeley, CA, USA

Vali Sorell, P.E., Syska Hennessy Group, Charlotte,
NC, USA
Ed Spears,  Eaton, Raleigh, NC, USA
Wade Vinson, Hewlett-Packard Company, Houston, TX,
USA
John Weale, P.E., LEED AP,  The Integral Group, Oakland,
CA, USA
Yutao Yang, China Electronics Standardization Institute,
Beijing, China

www.it-ebooks.info


Preface

Designing and operating a sustainable data center (DC)
requires technical knowledge and skills from strategic
planning, complex technologies, available best practices,
optimum operating efficiency, disaster recovery, and more.
Engineers and managers all face challenges operating
across functionalities, for example, facilities, IT, engineering, and business departments. For a mission-critical,
sustainable DC project, we must consider the following:
•â•¢ What are the goals?
•â•¢ What are the givens?
•â•¢ What are the constraints?
•â•¢ What are the unknowns?
•â•¢ Which are the feasible solutions?
•â•¢ How is the solution validated?
•â•¢ How does one apply technical and business knowledge to
develop an optimum solution plan that considers emerging technologies, availability, scalability, sustainability,
agility, resilience, best practices, and rapid time to value?
The list can go on and on. Our challenges may be as follows:
•â•¢ To prepare a strategic location plan
•â•¢ To design and build a mission critical DC with energy
efficient infrastructure
•â•¢ To apply best practices thus consuming less energy
•â•¢ To apply IT technologies such as cloud and virtualization and
•â•¢ To manage DC operations thus reducing costs and
carbon footprint
A good understanding of DC components, IT technologies,
and DC operations will enable one to plan, design, and
implement mission-critical DC projects successfully.

The goal of this handbook is to provide DC practitioners
with essential knowledge needed to implement DC design
and construction, apply IT technologies, and continually
improve DC operations. This handbook embraces both conventional and emerging technologies, as well as best practices that are being used in the DC industry. By applying the
information contained in the handbook, we can accelerate the
pace of innovations to reduce energy consumption and carbon
emissions and to “Save Our Earth Who Gives Us Life.”
The handbook covers the following topics:
•â•¢ DC strategic planning
•â•¢ Hosting, colocation, site selection, and economic
justifications
•â•¢ Plan, design, and implement a mission critical facility
•â•¢ IT technologies including virtualization, cloud, SDN,
and SDDC
•â•¢ DC rack layout and MEP design
•â•¢ Proven and emerging energy efficiency technologies
•â•¢ DC project management and commissioning
•â•¢ DC operations
•â•¢ Disaster recovery and business continuity
Each chapter includes essential principles, design and
�operations considerations, best practices, future trends, and
further readings. The principles cover fundamentals of a
technology and its applications. Design and operational
considerations include system design, operations, safety,
�
security, environment issues, maintenance, economy, and
best practices. There are useful tips for planning, implementing, and controlling operational processes. The future trends
and further reading sections provide visionary views and
lists of relevant books, technical papers, and websites for
additional reading.
xxiii

www.it-ebooks.info


Tài liệu bạn tìm kiếm đã sẵn sàng tải về

Tải bản đầy đủ ngay

×