Tải bản đầy đủ

Bulletins of American paleontology (Bull. Am. paleontol.) Vol 287

JUL 3

ia?5
\

.

HARVARD

UNIVgRSITV
BULLETINS OF AMERICAN PALEONTOLOGY
VOL.

67,

NO.

287, 1975

STUDIES IN PALEONTOLOGY


AND STRATIGRAPHY

Dedicated to

Kenneth

E. Caster,

Professor of Geology, University of Cincinnati
ON HIS 4Sth year of teaching.


pr




BULLETINS OF AMERICAN PALEONTOLOGY
Volume

67,

No. 287, 1975

STUDIES IN PALEONTOLOGY

AND STRATIGRAPHY

Edited by

John Pojeta,

Jr.

U.S. Geological Survey

Washington, D.C. 20244

John K. Pope
Miami University


Oxford, Ohio 45056

June

This book

is

14,

affectionately dedicated to

KENNETH
by

1975

his

E.

CASTER

former students


Library of Congress Card Number: 75-1

Printed in the United States of America
Arnold Printing Corporation

i


CONTENTS
Page
Dedication

«

-

Biography of K. E. Caster

La Casa en

The

1

_

Clifton Heights

-

,

publications of K. E. Caster

5





8



_...

12

Introduction

List of

monetary contributors

Scientific

1.

2.

contributions

15



~

and paleoecology of Carboniferous
Group, Brooks Range, Arctic Alaska
Augustus K. Armstrong
Stratigraphy

Ontogeny and systematics of Timeischytes

corals,

casteri, n.

Lisburne
17

sp.:

An

enig-

matic Devonian edrioasteroid
Bruce M. Bell
3.

9

33

Podial efficacy of some Ordovician asteroids (Echinodermata) from

North America
J.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

Wayne

Branstrator

57

Lower Carboniferous brachiopods from Axel Heiberg and Melville
John

Islands, Canadian Arctic Archipelago
L. Carter

71

Middle Devonian Bone Beds and the Columbus-Delaware (Onondagan-Hamiltonian) contact in Central Ohio
James E. Conkin and Barbara M. Conkin

99

New

bifoliate tubular bryozoan genera from the Simpson Group
(Middle Ordovician), Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma
George T. Farmer, Jr

123

American Lituitidae (Cephalopoda)
Rousseau H. Flower

139

Some problems in coral phylogeny and classification
Rousseau H. Flower and Helen M. Duncan

175


Page
9.

10.

A

Maquoketa-like molluscan community in the Brassfield Formation
(Early Silurian) of Adams County, Ohio
William B. Harrison, III and Linda Kelley Harrison
Casterolimulus:

A

new late Cretaceous generic link in limulid lineage
_
Mark Erickson and Douglas E. O'Brien

F. D. Holland, Jr., J.

11.

12.

13.

14.

Ontogenies of three late Cambrian trilobites from the
Formation, northern Black Hills, South Dakota

16.

17.

235

Deadwood

Chung-Hung Hu

251

ancestry, geographical extent, and fate of the Brassfield coral
fauna (Middle Llandovery, North America)
Richard S. Laub

273

Hitchhiking clams in the Marcellus Sea
Osborne B. Nye, Jr., James C. Brovver and Steven E. Wilson

287

The

Trilobite trace fossils from the Clinton
Central New York State

Richard G. Osgood,
15.

193

Jr.

Group

(Silurian)

of East-

and William T. Drennen, HI

299

Systematics and functional morphology of Columbocystis, a Middle
Ordovician "Cystidean" (Echinodermata) of uncertain affinities
Ronald L. Parsley

349

Fordilla iroyensis Barrande and early pelecypod phylogeny
John Pojeta, Jr

363

Evidence for relating the Lepidocoleidae, machaeridian echinoderms,
to the mitrate carpoids

John K. Pope
18.

19.

20.

385

_

The genus Plumalina

Hall, 1858 (Coelenterata)
Daniel B. Sass and Barrett N. Rock

Monocyclism vs. Dicyclism:
John M. Warn

A

primary schism



Re-examined

in crinoid

407

phylogeny?
423

The

sexual dimorphism and ontogeny of Ceratopsis chambersi (Mil(Ostracoda, Palaeocopida) from the Upper Ordovician of southwestern Ohio and northern Kentucky
Steven M. Warshauer
ler)

443


STUDIES IN PALEONTOLOGY

AND STRATIGRAPHY

KENNETH EDWARD CASTER
'Paleontology

is

an art as well as a science."

Kenneth Caster is a complex man. Raised and educated in upNew York, and Pennsylvania, he blends the resourcefulness
and craftsmanship of the Yankee pioneers of his part of this country
with the imagination and analytical mind of the scientist and the
wit and sophistication of a man of letters and international travel.
Those who have learned from him have come away inspired, aware
not only of their science but also of the breadth of man's other finer
endeavors, such as art and literature, and of nature's riches. Few scientists combine the penetrating intelligence, rapid comprehension of
detail, stamina, and enthusiasm for life to permit themselves simultaneously to become both masters of their chosen fields and broadly
authoritative throughout the arts, humanities, and other sciences as
state

well.

Born in New Albany, Pennsylvania, in 1908, Kenneth Caster
grew up in Ithaca, New York. There he received his early education and at Cornell University, his A.B. in 1929, M.S. in 1931, and
Ph.D. in 1933. Even before entering college, Kenneth came under
the influence and inspiration of J. C. Bradley, entomologist, and
E. Laurence Palmer, natural historian, both of Cornell University.
In his early college years. Caster's interest was entomology.

even while serving as an assistant

How-

entomology
to Bradley, his interest was diverted toward the work of G. D.
Harris, paleontologist and stratigrapher in the Department of

ever, as a senior,

in

Geology at Cornell University. Harris, although a

specialist

in

Tertiary mollusks, recognized the need for continuing work in the

New York and there
The result was Caster's study of the
and stratigraphy of the Upper Devonian and Lower Carboniof southwestern New York and northwestern Pennsylvania,

mid-Paleozoic rocks of Pennsylvania and
directed Caster's attention.

faunas
ferous

his doctoral dissertation, his early publications,

interest in that part of the geologic

column.

and

his continuing


Kenneth

While

still

Harris' "right

Upon

Caster

E.

a graduate student at

hand man"

Cornell,

Caster served as

in the post of Instructor of Paleontology.

receiving his doctoral degree, and after his marriage to the

gracious Anneliese, Kenneth

moved

rapidly through the positions of

Instructor of Geology and Paleontology at Cornell, and Assistant

Head

He

of Science at the

New York

State

Normal School

at Geneseo.

arrived at the University of Cincinnati in 1936 as Instructor in

Geology and Curator

of the

Geology Museum and rose steadily to
Geology (1952) and Fellow of

his present position of Professor of

the Graduate School. Additionally, he held visiting professorships at
Potsdam State College (1936), Universidade de Sao Paulo, Brazil

(1944-47), Escuela Nacional de Minas, Colombia (1948), University
of Virginia Biological Station (1955), University of Tasmania (195657), University of California at Berkeley (1962), University of

Germany (1964), and

Cologne,

University of Southern California

(1966, 1970).

Kenneth's society memberships,
distinctions are too

numerous

to

activities,

list fully.

and even honors and

He was

recipient of the

Derby Medal at the Brazihan Geological Survey Centennial (1952)
and of the Gondwana Medal at the Geological Survey of India
Centennial (1956). He has received Guggenheim and Fulbright Fellowships for travel and study in South America, Africa, Australia,

New

Zealand and grants from the National Research Council,
Geological Society of America and National Science Foundation for

and

study of Upper Ordovician, Devonian, and Mississippian faunas and
stratigraphy. He is a fellow or has been an executive officer of ten
of the 38 societies

and foundations

of

is a member, inMacDowell Society (1964-

which he

cluding the presidency of the Cincinnati

66), Paleontological Society (1960), and twice the presidency of the
Paleontological Research Institution.

To

find the source of Caster's success

the impressively long

most

At

list

of geological time

first

and acclaim, we must scan
Their subjects span

of his publications.

and touch upon almost

all

animal phyla.

glance, there seems to be no general systematic or chrono-

logic organization to the papers. It quickly

becomes apparent that

the papers are divided into vaguely defined periods. Like the paintings of Picasso, Caster's papers are arranged into periods reflecting
his

changing interests: the Devono-Mississippian Period, by exten-


Kenneth

E.

Caster

Hemisphere Period, the Sponge Period, the Jellyfish Period, the Merostome Period, the Continental Drift Period and
the Echinoderm-Carpoid Period, The papers may also be organized
by theme. Some, as the Devono-Mississippian faunal and stratigraphic studies and the South American studies, are comprehensive
attacks upon large and widely known geological problems. Others,
as the merostome and carpoid papers, began with serendipity, the
sion, the Austral

chance discovery of

fossils

out of place in time or of such exceptional

new

preservation as to shed

upon

light

their groups.

of papers in this category are Caster building

largely laid

by Caster. Underlying



imagination

all

The

upon

of the papers

is

succession

a foundation

excellence and

excellence in comprehension and presentation,

and

imagination in finding and exposing the unique qualities of each
subject.

Moreover Caster dared

to be unconventional.

The demon-

and even
American stratigraphy.

stration of facies in his early work, at that time a novel

unpopular concept, has become a
His eloquent insistence over

classic in

many

years that continental drift

is

"a topic at least worthy of consideration" has finally been justified.

These bare

name
is

Caster. It

facts,
is

in

Kenneth

revealed.

however, do not reveal the

is

a

man

of art;

is

a trustee of the

in literature.

artifacts

The

behind the

he and Anneliese regularly

have attended musical and theater productions

Kenneth

man

Kenneth's other interests that his personality

Casters'

in Cincinnati

where

Playhouse in the Park. Kenneth delights

handsome home displays not only the

and handicrafts which are mementos of their global

travels,

but also endless bookshelves housing their non-scientific collection.
Kenneth's spacious office and anteroom at the University contain
one of the finest private paleontological libraries in the world. His
correspondence

is

voluminous and international. From

this,

as a

secondary benefit, he adds to his extensive stamp collection. Caster's

humor and
by

tolerance of students'

humor

is

legendary, as witnessed

from the "University of the State of Collapse", his
charter membership in the "Lipalian Research Foundation", his
"Agawana Medal", and his perseverance under the stare from the
his degree

bronze bust of Ernst Haeckel placed high atop a bookcase in his
office.

Kenneth

is

generous with his time and information. Years

ago, there clustered about

amateur,

fossil collectors

him

who

a

band

of dedicated, enthusiastic,

organized to become the

Dry

Dredgers.


Kenneth

E,

Caster

In return for patient instruction, he has received from them some
of the finer specimens in the

Geology Museum. Both Kenneth and

AnneUese are warm, generous, and hospitable.
ings of graduate students at their

home and

The

frequent gather-

their continuing concern

for students has resulted in a binding, life-long esprit

de corps. Not

only Kenneth's mastery of paleontology, his outstanding teaching
and research, but also his magnetic personality have drawn generations of students to Cincinnati.

LA CASA EN CLIFTON HEIGHTS
El homenaje a un cientifico que llega a los 45 anos de vida, no
solo de sobresalientes trabajos de investigacion, sino de

ensenanza

universitaria para cuyo desempeiio feliz se necesita

una vocacion

monacal, no puede ser mas merecido y oportuno.
Hay sinembargo, fuera de la parte cientlfica,

la

que

es

misma

en realidad
del

la

recordar

y

hogar de

humana

que aglutina en un todo coherente,

hombre. Quien esto escribe ha tenido

amistad de Kenneth y

parte

Ana Caster por mas

casi

la

vida

de la
que pueda

el privilegio

anos de

los

desea rememorar en estas cortas lineas, la trayectoria del

los

Caster como un lugar siempre abierto para

sos paleontologos

geologos americanos

y

los

numero-

y extranjeros conocidos a

lo

largo de los extensos viajes de los Caster por Sur America, Africa,
Australia, Europa, etc.
ser

una

— Aquella casona de Cincinnati ha llegado a

Embajada diplomatica sin el pesado aspecto
con una incomparable y acogedora llaneza que

especie de

oficial usual,

rememora

la

y

si

hospitalidad de los tiempos coloniales norteamericanos.

Como uno de los paleontologos extranjeros que se ha acogido
muchas veces al techo protector y hospitalaria de Kenneth y Ana,
me atrevo a hacerme vocero de los muchos otros visitantes cientificos
multinacionales, al pedir a los espiritus protectores de la Paleontologia

y

sus cultores, permitan

que en

los

muchos anos por

venir,

hogar de Clifton Heights y sus duenos, sigan siendo el lugar obligado de peregrinacion bajo la sombra del arioso Gingko, arbol
el

mas que apropiado para proteger
doble caracter de arbol sagrado

y

el

hogar de un paleontologo, en su

fosil

viviente.

G. Botero-Arango.
Medellin, Colombia


Kenneth

E.

Caster

THE PUBLICATIONS OF KENNETH
1930.

CASTER

faunas of the Upper Allegheny. Bull. Amer. Paleont, vol,
174 pp., 59 pis.
Upper Devonian rocks at Ithaca, Neio York. (Abstract), Geol. Soc.

Higher
No.

IS,

1933.

E.

fossil
58,

America,

1933.
1934.
1934.
1935.
1935.
1935.
1935.

1935.
1935.

1937.
1938.
1938.
1938.

1938.

Bull., vol. 44, pp. 201-202.
Stratigraphic relationships in northtwestern Pennsylvania. (Abstract).
Geol. Soc. America, Bull., vol. 44, pp. 202-203.
Fades nomenclature and the Upper De-vonian. (Abstract). Geol. Soc.
America, Proc. 1933, pp. 348-349.
The stratigraphy and paleontology of northiuestern Pennsylvania, Part 1,
Stratigraphy. Bull. Amer. Paleont., vol. 21, No. 71, 185 pp., 2 pis.
With P. D. Torrey and G. H. Chadwick. Demise of the Bradfordian
Series. Amer. Assoc. Petroleum Geol., Bull., vol. 19, pp. 912-915.
Upper Devonian marine faunas in the Seaivard Phase of the Catskill
magnafacies. (Abstract). Geol. Soc, America, Proc. 1934, p. 363.
Boundary between the Devonian and Mississippian Systems in ivestern
Pennsylvania. (Abstract). Geol. Soc. America, Proc. 1934, pp. 441-442.
With A. A. Olsson. Occurrence of Baculiies ovatus Zone of Upper Alberta
Shales in southeastern British Columbia. Amer. Assoc. Petroleum Geo!.,
Bull., vol. 19, pp. 295-299; (Abstract). Geol. Soc. America, Proc. 1934, pp,
363-364, 1935.
With Bradford Willard. Age of the Devonian of south^vestem Pennsylvania. Amer. Assoc. Petroleum Geol., Bull., vol. 19, pp. 1546-1550.
With R. H. Flower. The stratigraphy and paleontology of northiuestern
Pennsylvania, Part 2, Paleontology, Section A, The Cephalopod Fauna
of the Coneivango Series of the Upper Devonian in Nev: York and
Pennsylvania. Bull. Amer. Paleont, vol. 22, No. 75, pp. 199-270, 8 pis,
With A. A. Olsson. Devonian fauna from Colombia, South America.
(Abstract). Geol. Soc. America, Proc. 1936, pp. 369-370.
A restudy of the tracks of Paramphibius. Jour. Paleont., vol. 12, pp. 3-60,
13 pis. (Abstract). Geol. Soc. America, Proc. 1936, pp. 366, 1937.
Nezu genera of Upper Devonian Pelccypoda. (Abstract). Geol. Soc.
America, Proc. 1937, p. 271, 1938.
Some facieological aspects of the pelecypod fauna of the Coneivango
Series of the Upper Devonian in New York and Pennsylvania. (Abstract).
Geol. Soc. America, Proc. 1937, pp. 271-272, 1938.
Pterygotus in the Richmond of Ohio. (Abstract). Geol. Soc. America,
Bull.,

vol. 49, p.

1872.

Preliminary notes on the revision of the crenulate-hinged Strophomenacea.
(Abstract). Geol. Soc. America, Bull., vol. 49, p. 1911.
1938. Macroscopic fauna of the Ouimbriz (Eocene) Formation on the Luculo
River, Angola. Communicacoes dos Services Geologicos de Portugal, vol.
1938.

20, pp. 1-37.

1939.

1939.
1939.

1939.

Siliceous sponges from the Mississippian and Devonian strata of the
Penn-York Embayment. Jour. Paleont., vol. 13, pp. 1-20, 4 pis. (Abstract).

Geol. Soc. America, Bull., vol 49, pp. 1910-1911, 1938.
Comparison of the siliceous sponges Armstrongia Clarke, 1920, and
Titusvillia Caster, 1939. Jour. Paleont., vol. 13, pp. 531-532.
Were Micrichnus scotti Abel and Artiodactylus sinclairi Abel of the
Newark Series (Triassic) made by vertebrates or limuloidsf Am. Jour.
Sci., vol. 237, pp. 786-797.

A

Devonian fauna from Colombia.

218
1939.

Bull.

Amer.

Paleont., vol. 24, No. 83,

pp., 14 pis.

vertebrates make the trails Kouphichnium (Jurassic) and Micrichnus
(Triassic)? (Abstract). Geol. Soc. America, Bull., vol. 50, p. 1971.

Did


Kenneth

10

1939.

Some

biological considerations

E.

in

Caster

interpreting the

Penn-York Embayment. (Abstract). Geol.

Soc.

stratigraphy of the

America,

Bull., vol. 50, pp.

1976-1977.
1939.

With W. H. Bucher and Stewart Jones. Elementary description
cinnatian fossils and strata and plates of commoner fossils in the

1940.

Die sogenannten "Wirbeltierspuren" und die Limulusfdhrten der Soln-

of Cinvicinity

of Cincinnati, Ohio. Univ. Cincinnati, 13 pp., 8 pis.

hofencr Plattenkalkc. Palaeontologische Zeitschrift, vol. 22, pp. 12-29.
The Titusi/illiidae; Paleozoic and Recent branching Hexactinellida.
Palaeontographica Americana, vol. 2, No. 12, 52 pp., 5 pis.
1941. Trails of Limulus and supposed vertebrates from Solnhofen Lithographic
Limestone. Pan-American Geologist, vol. 76, pp. 241-258.
1941. Paleozoic geography of South America ivith particular reference to the
Devonian. (Abstract). Geol. Soc. America, Bull., vol. 52, p. 1892.
1941. Titusvilliidae: Useful stratigraphic indices. (Abstract). Geol. Soc. Amer1941.

ica, Bull., vol. 52, p. 1962.

1942.

A

from the Upper Cambrian of IVyoming. Amer. Jour. Sci.,
pp. 104-112, pi. 1; (Abstract). Geol. Soc. America, Bull., vol.
52, pp. 1962, 1941.
The paleontological collections of the University of Cincinnati. Science,
laotirid

vol. 240,

1942.

vol. 95,

1942.

No. 2470, pp. 454-455.

With G. A. Cooper,

et

al.

Correlation

of the

Formations of North America. Geol. Soc. America,

Devonian Sedimentary
Bull., vol. 53, pp. 1729-

1794, 1 pi.

1942.
1942.

1944.
1944.
1944.
1944.
1945.
1945.
1945.

The age and relations of the Colombian Devonian strata. Eighth American
Science Congress (Washington, D.C., 1940), Proc, vol. 4, pp. 27-67.
Tvi)o siphonophores from the Paleozoic. Palaeontographica Americana,
vol. 3, No. 14, 34 pp., 2 pis.
Limulid trails from the Upper Triassic (Chinle) of the Petrified Forest
National Monument, Arizona. Amer. Jour. Sci., vol. 242, pp. 74-84, pi. 1.
Hydrozoan jellyfish from the Loiver Cretaceous of Texas. (Abstract).
Geol. Soc. America, Bull., vol. 55, p. 1465.
New synziphosuroid merostome from the Loiver Ordovician of Tennessee.
(Abstract). Geol. Soc. America, Bull., vol. 55, pp. 1465-1466.
fVas Rhizostomites admirandus Haeckel of Solnhofen a true jellyfish?
(Abstract). Geol. Soc. America, Bull., vol. 55, p. 1466.
A new jellyfish (Kirklandia texana Caster) from the Loiver Cretaceous
of Texas. Palaeontographica Americana, vol. 3, No. 18, 52 pp., 5 pis.
Ncvu names for tivo homonyms. Jour. Paleont., vol. 19, p. 319.
With W. H. Bucher and S. M. Jones. Elementary guide to the fossils and
strata in the vicinity of Cincinnati. Cincinnati Museum Nat. Hist, 31
pp., 9 pis.

Carboniferous deposits of southern Goias and Mato Grosso. (Abstract).
Geol. Soc. America, Bull., vol. 58, pp. 1171-1172.
1947. Devonian System in Goias and Mato Grosso, Brazil. (Abstract). Geol.
Soc. America, Bull., vol. 58, p. 1172.
1947. With S. Petril [Petri]. Devonian stratigraphy and paleontology of the
States of Parana and Sao Paulo, Brazil. (Abstract). Geol. Soc. America,
1947.

Bull., vol. 58, p. 1173.

1947.

Expedi^do geologica em Goias

e

Mato

Grosso. Mineragao e Metalurgia,

vol. 12, pp. 126-127.

1947.
1947.

Excursdo geologica ao Estado do Paiu'i (Brasil). Ibid, pp. 271-272.
With J. C. Mendes. DuToifs geological comparison of South America
•with South Africa after tiventy years. (Abstract). Geol. Soc. America,
Bull., vol.

1948.

With

58,

pp. 1171-1173.

M. Waller,

et al. Correlation of the Misstssippian Formations
of North America. Geol. Soc. America, Bull., vol. 59, pp. 91-196.
J.


Kenneth

1951.

With

E. N.
graptus, an

America,
1952.
1952.

E.

Kjellesvig-Waering.

Upper Ordovician

Caster

11

Concerning the eurypterid Megaloanachronism. (Abstract). Geol. Soc.

Bull., vol. 62, pp. 1428-1429.

With O. D. von Engeln. Geology, 730 pp.. New York, McGraw-Hill
Book Co.
Stratigraphic and paleontologic data relevant to the problem of AfroAmerican ligation during the Paleozoic and early Mcsozoic. Amer. Mus.
Nat. Hist., Bull., vol. 99, pp. 105-158.

Concerning Enoploura of the Upper Ordovician and its relation to other
carpoid Echinodermata. Bull. Amer. Paleont., vol. 34, No. 141, 56 pp.,
4 pis.
1952. With W. B. Macke. An aglaspid merostome from the Upper Ordovician
of Ohio. Jour. Paleont., vol. 26, pp. 753-757, pi. 109.
1952. Relationships of the carpoid echinoderms in the light of Enoploura. (Abstract). Geol. Soc. America, Bull., vol. 63, p. 1239.
1953. Translator with J. C. Mendes. Comparacao Geologica entre a America
do Sul e a Africa do Sul, by A. L. DuToit. Rio de Janeiro, Inst. Brasil
1952.

1953.

Geog. e Estatistica, Serv. Graf., 179 pp.
Afro-American linkage in the Paleozoic.
Cong., 19th, Algiers, 1952, Comptes Rendus,

(Abstract).

Internat.

Geol.

sec. 2, fasc. 2, p. 103.

With

E. N. Kjellesvig-Waering. Melbournopterus, a netv Silurian eurypfrom Australia. Jour. Paleont., vol. 27, pp. 153-156, pi. 20.
1954. Brazilian Devonian carpoids. (Abstract). Jour. Paleont., vol. 28, p. 511.
1954. A new carpoid echinodcrm from the Parana Devonian. Acad. Brasil

1953.

terid

1954.

de Cien, Anais, vol. 26, pp. 123-147.
Introductory survey of the Brazilian Carboniferous. Bull. Amer. Paleont.,

1955.

With

1955.

A

No. 149, pp. 1-14.
E. A. Dalve and J. K. Pope. Elementary guide to the fossils and
strata of the Ordovician in the vicinity of Cincinnati, Ohio. Cincinnati
Mus. Nat. Hist., 47 pp., 8 pis. New Edition 1961.
Devonian placocystoid echinoderm from Parana, Brazil. In Paleontologia do Parana, F. W. Lange, ed., Curitiba, Brazil, pp. 137-148, pi. 8.
With E. N. Kjellesvig-Waering. Marsupipterus, an unusual eurypterid
from the Doivntonian of England. Jour. Paleont., vol. 29, pp. 1040-1041.
With E. N. Kjellesvig-Waering. The Pterygotidae of the Silurian Vernon
Shales of Neiv York. Jour. Paleont., vol. 29, pp. 1041-1047.
With E. N. Kjellesvig-Waering. Some notes on the genus Dolichopterus
Hall. Jour. Paleont., vol. 30, pp. 19-28, pi. 4.
With
K. Brooks. Nevj fossils from the Canadian-Chazyan (Ordovician) hiatus in Tennessee. Bull. Am. Paleont., vol. 36, No. 157, pp. 157199, pis. 12-21.
With H. K. Brooks. Pseudoarctolepis sharpei, n. gen., n. sp. (Phyllocarida), from the JVheeler Shale (Middle Cambrian) of Utah. Jour.
Paleont., vol. 30, pp. 9-14, pi. 2.
With T. H. Eaton, Jr. Microstructure of the Plates in the carpoid echinoderm Paranacystis. Jour. Paleont., vol. 30, pp. 611-614, pi. 74.
vol. 35,

1955.

1955.
1956.
1956.

1956.

1956.

1956.

H

Australian carpoid echinoderms. (Abstract). Resumes de los Trabajos
Presentados,
International Geological Congress, Mexico, p. 116.
With E. D. Gill and P. C. R. Boswell. Simple apparatus for vacuum injection of moulding latex. Australian Jour. Science, vol. 18^ pp. 198-199.
Annotated Bibliography. In Ladd, H. S., ed., PaleoProblcmatica
ecology. Geol. Soc. America, Mem. 67, pp. 1025-1032.
With E. D. Gill. Australian and New Zealand Silurian-Devonian carpoids. (Abstract). Geol. Soc. America, Bull., vol. 68, p. 1707.
Palaeogeography. Encyclopaedia Americana, vol. 21, pp. 159-163.
Gondwanaland. Encyclopaedia Britannica, vol. 10, pp. 569-570.

XX

1956.
1957.
1957.
1959.
1960.




Kenneth

12

E.

Caster

With E. D. Gill. Carpoid echinoderms from the Silurian and Devonian of
Australia. Bull. Amer. Paleont., vol. 41, pp. 1-71, 10 pis.
1960. With J. K. Pope. Morphology and affinities of Eocrinus, an archetype
of the Echinodermata. (Abstract). Geol. Soc. America, Bull., vol. 71, pp.
1840-1841.
1961. Paleontologica enigtnatica Caster. Jour. Paleont., vol. 35, pp. 238-240.
1961. Sunday all-day excursion in the Cincinnati Region. Field Trip 7, in Geol.
Soc. America Guidebook for Field Trips, Cincinnati Meeting: New York,
Geol. Soc. America, pp. 253-257.
1963. With A. J. Boucot, David Ives, and J. A. Talent. Relationships of a
neiu Loiucr Devonian tcrcbratuloid (Brachiopoda) from Antarctica. Bull.
Amer. Paleont., vol. 46, No. 207, pp. 80-151, pis. 16-41.
neiu class of Echinoderms. Sci1963. With J. W. Durham. Helicoplacoidca:
ence, vol. 140, No. 3568, pp. 820-822.
1964. With E. N. Kjellesvig-Waering. Upper Ordovician curypterids of Ohio.
Palaeontographica Americana, vol. 4, No. 32, pp. 301-358, pis. 43-53.
1965. With R. L. Parsley. North American Soluta (Carpoidea, Echinodermata).
Bull. Amer. Paleont., vol. 49, No. 221, pp. 109-174, pis. 16-18.
1965. Memorial to Ray S. Basslcr (1878-1961). Geol. Soc. America, Bull., vol.
76, pp. 167-174.
1966. With J. W. Durham. Helicoplacoids. In Treatise on Invertebrate
Geol. Soc. America and
Pt. U, Echinodermata 3, v. 1
Paleontology
Univ. Kansas Press, pp. U131-U136.
Pt. S, Echino1967. Homoiostelea. In Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology
dermata 1, V. 2: Geol. Soc. America and Univ. Kansas Press, pp. S581S627.
I960.

A



:



INTRODUCTION
The

idea of a Caster Festschrift occurred to us in the

way

summer

of

Kenneth Caster's scholarship in paleonand
the fact that he has had over 50 gradtology and stratigraphy,
uate students more than half of whom obtained their Ph.D. degrees
1972, as a

of honoring

We

felt that an anniversary publicawould be his 45th year of teaching.
his charming wife Annie, and Katherine
VanWinkle Palmer, his longtime friend and editor of the publications
of the Paleontological Research Institution, and received enthusiastic

at the University of Cincinnati.
tion

would be appropriate
We first approached

as 1974

support for the project.

To

raise

money

to publish this

book we decided to approach

K.E.C.'s present and former students, friends, paleontological and

Department

Geology at the University
of Cincinnati, and the Dry Dredgers, an organization of collectors
of fossils in and around Cincinnati, Ohio. The response to our request was overwhelming and in short order we had funds enough to
go ahead with the Caster volume. A list of all monetary contributors
faculty colleagues, the

follows this introduction.

of


Kenneth

With the
to publish

full

E.

Caster

13

cooperation of Katherine Palmer,

was decided

it

the book as a volume of the Bulletins of American

Paleontology, This seemed especially appropriate because

Ken was

D. Harris, who founded the Bulletins and the
Paleontological Research Institution, and because K. E. C. and his
a student of G.

students have published extensively in the two series of the Paleontological

Research Institution.

The scope

of paleontology at Cincinnati

the contributed papers assembled here.

geography,

biostratigraphy,

functional

is

The

broad as

is

shown by

subjects include, bio-

morphology,

descriptive

morphology, ontogeny, paleoecology, phylogeny, and systematics.
The animal groups discussed are: anthozoans, asteroids, brachiopods,
bryozoans, cephalopods, crinoids, edrioasteroids, gastropods, limulids,

machaeridians, ostracodes, pelecypods, trilobites, and ichnofossils.
Stratigraphically, the papers span the geologic

Cambrian to the Cretaceous, with

column from the

special concentration in the lower

and middle Paleozoic.
K. E. C. has worked with famous colleagues at Cincinnati and
elsewhere and has written
that he

is

best

studied with

known

many

we like to think
number of students who have
from him at Old Tech (the building
publications, but

for the large

him and learned

which houses the Department of Geology at the University of Cincinnati). Ken Caster's personality, his thorough understanding of
the

field, his

great ability as a teacher, the University's large collec-

and the

tion of fossils,
fossils, all

fact that Cincinnatian rocks

abound with

contribute to attracting fledgling students of paleontology

to Cincinnati.

Once

there, students first get a solid

background

in

systematics before passing on to other aspects of paleontology.
it was decided to limit the scientific conbook to Ph.D. students of K. E. C; 19 of his students were able to contribute papers. Of those by several writers
only the senior author was a student of Caster. So, Ken, for better
or worse, you have only yourself to blame for what follows, for none
of us would have gotten this far without your help and personal

Early in the project

tributions in this

blessing.

Many

thanks!



MONETARY CONTRIBUTORS TO THIS BOOK
Anonymous

Cincinnati, Ohio

Menlo Park,

A. K. Armstrong

M. G. Arnold (In memory
H. M. Duncan)

California

of

Washington, D.C.

G. B. Barbour

Cincinnati, Ohio

M. Bell
M.
Berdan
J.
LeRon Bielak

Albany,

B.

Washington, D.C.
Cincinnati, Ohio

Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Black,
R.

S.

Jr.

Boardman

Gerardo Botero-Arango
J.

W.

Branstrator

Madeleine Briskin

Cincinnati, Ohio

Washington, D.C.
Medellin, Colombia
Davis, California
Cincinnati, Ohio

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

L. Carter

J.

New York

College of Wooster

Wooster, Ohio

Conkin
G. Arthur Cooper

Louisville,

E.

J.

Washington, D.C.
East Lansing, Michigan

A. T. Cross
J.

Kentucky

Cincinnati, Ohio

A. Dalve

R. A. Davis

Cincinnati, Ohio

Bettyann Dickey

Cincinnati, Ohio

H. H. Dresser

Butte,

Dry Dredgers

Montana

at the University

of Cincinnati

Cincinnati, Ohio

R. H. Durrell

Cincinnati, Ohio

G. T. Farmer

Harrisonburg, Virginia

Graduate Fellows University of
Cincinnati, Ohio

Cincinnati
C. A. Fleming

Lower Hutt,

R. H. Flower

Socorro,

J.

Zealand

Mexico
Bowling Green, Ohio

L. Forsyth

Department

New

New

of Geology,

University of Cincinnati

Cincinnati, Ohio

E. D. Gill

Canterbury, Australia

W.
W.
W.

Cincinnati, Ohio

F.

R.

T.

Goodman
Harmon

B. Harrison

D. Holland,

Jr.

Chung-Hung Hu
J.

W. Huddle

Cincinnati, Ohio

Kalamazoo, Michigan
Grand Forks, North Dakota
Taiwan, Formosa
Washington, D.C.


VV.

D. Huff

Cincinnati, Ohio

W.

F. Jenks

Cincinnati, Ohio

Washington, D.C.
Denver, Colorado

O. L. Karklins

M. Kosanke

R.

H. S. Ladd
Roger Laib

Washington, D.C.
Cincinnati, Ohio

W. M.

Grand Forks, North Dakota

L.

Laird

Cincinnati, Ohio

H. Larsen

New York

Richard Laub

Buffalo,

Douglas Lorenz

Los Angeles, California

W.
W.

B.

Montana
Las Vegas, Nevada

Macke

Billings,

A. McClellan

Stephen Meyers

Cincinnati, Ohio

Margaret and Martha Neu
New Mexico Institute of
Mining and Technology

Cincinnati, Ohio

New

Socorro,

Mexico

O. B. Nye, Jr.

Detroit, Michigan

R. G. Osgood

Wooster, Ohio

K. V.

W. Palmer

Ithaca,

New

R. L. Parsley

New York

Orleans, Louisiana

R. A. Pohowsky

London, England

John and Mary Lou Pojeta
John K. Pope

Washington, D.C.

P. E. Potter

Cincinnati, Ohio

D. B. Sass

Alfred,

M.

Midland, Texas

F. Schweinfurth

Oxford, Ohio

New York
New York

F. C.

Shaw

Bronx,

R.

Singh

Highland Heights, Kentucky
Cincinnati, Ohio

J.

Irene K. Stephany

Michael Stephens
St.

Lawrence University

Joseph Stocker,

Jr.

Russell Swaim
Gary Taylor

M. Warn

Pasadena, California

Canton,

New York

Cincinnati, Ohio
Cincinnati, Ohio
Cincinnati, Ohio

Steven and Yvette Warshauer

Houston, Texas
Morgantown, West Virginia

E. L. Yochelson

Washington, D.C.

J.

Lester B.

Zimmerman

Cincinnati, Ohio


STRATIGRAPHY AND PALEOECOLOGY OF
CARBONIFEROUS CORALS, LISBURNE GROUP,
BROOKS RANGE, ARCTIC ALASKA
Augustus K. Armstrong
Menlo Park, California 94025

U.S. Geological Survey,

ABSTRACT
The Carboniferous Lisburne Group of arctic Alaska contains coral faunas
ranging in age from Osagean (Early Mississippian) to Atokan (Middle
Pennsylvanian). Osagean beds have a small fauna of solitary and tabulate
corals. Meramecian and lowermost Chesterian beds contain a large fauna of
Ekvasophyllum spp., Fabcropliyllum spp., Diphyphyllum 'venosum Armstrong,
D. klaivockensis Armstrong, D. nasorakcnsis Armstrong, Lithostrotion (Siphonodendron) dutroi Armstrong, L. (S.) sinuosum (Kelly), L. (S.) ivarreni Nelson,
L. (S.) lisburnensis Armstrong, Lithostrotion reiscri Armstrong, Lithostrotionella
niakensis Armstrong, L. banffcnsis (Warren), L. mclareni (Sutherland), L.
birdi Armstrong, L. pennsylvanica
(Shimer), Thysanophyllum astraeiforme
(Warren), T. orientale Thomson, Sciop/iyllum lambarti Harker and McLaren,
and S. alaskacnsis Armstrong. Corals, rare in younger Chesterian beds, are
Lithostrotionella aff. L. mclareni (Sutherland), Lithostrotion (S-) ignekensts
Armstrong, Syringopora spp., and occasional solitary corals. Pennsylvanian
(Atokan) beds of the Lisburne Group contain Lithostrotionella ivahooensis Armstrong, Corivenia jagocnsis Armstrong, a thick-walled syringoporoid, and
Michelinia sp.
Preliminary studies of the lithostrotionoids indicate that the Lisburne
Group can be divided into eight coral-assemblage zones. The zones in ascending
order are: Meramecian, 4 zones: Lithostrotion (S.) dutroi Armstrong, L. reiseri
Armstrong, Lithostrotionella mclareni (Sutherland), and Sciophyllum lambarti
Harker and McLaren; Meramecian-Chesterian transition, 1 zone: Lithostrotion
(S.) lisburnensis Armstrong; Chesterian, 2 zones: Lithostrotionella
aff. L.
mclareni (Sutherland) and Lithostrotion (S-) ignekensis Armstrong; Atokan,
1 zone: Corivenia jagoensis Armstrong.
Lisburne limestones were deposited on a slowly subsiding carbonate platform and are cyclic. Colonial corals of Meramecian and Atokan age occur
in carbonates associated with shallow-water shoaling facies. The paucity of
corals in carbonates of Osagean, Chesterian, and Morrowan age is attributed
to regional temperature or salinity changes that inhibited their growth. Carboniferous corals are not known to have formed reefiike masses in arctic Alaska,
but some biostromal accumulations occur.

INTRODUCTION
The
shown

locations of Carboniferous outcrops in arctic Alaska are

in Text-figure 1. Field collecting

began

in 1962,

and labora-

tory studies are only partly completed; therefore, this paper

is

an

interim report. Lisburne solitary rugose and tabulate coral faunas

have not been studied and
report,

which does not

are, therefore,

reflect their

poorly represented in this

numerical importance

in

the

faunas.

Thirty-six stratigraphic sections in the Brooks Range, arctic

Alaska, were measured by Jacob's staff and tape.
feral

Rock and foramini3 m). Coral
Thin sections were

samples were collected every 5 to 10 feet (1.5 to

collections

were made throughout the section.





Carboniferous corals, Alaska

made

for

19

carbonate microfacies and microfossil studies.

The

corals

were studied by means of 2-inch by 3-inch oriented thin sections.

Bernard L. Mamet's microfossil identifications and zonations
are used in the biostratigraphic analysis of the Lisburne
arctic Alaska,

Group

of

and the determination of the vertical ranges of

its

coral faunas.
I

party

wish to express
chief,

summer

my

appreciation to Irvin L. Tailleur, the

of 1968,

and Hillard N. Reiser, the party

chief,

summers of 1969-1971, for their generosity in supporting my Lisburne Group coral collecting and stratigraphic studies. I wish to
thank the Naval Arctic Research Laboratory (Barrow), Office of
Naval Research, for their logistical support of fieldwork in summers
1968-1971. Large collections of corals, Foraminifera, and thin sections used in this study were collected
gists in 1959-1964; the collections I

employed by
Survey.

My

Shell Oil

by

made

Shell Oil

Company, were given

appreciation

is

Company

geolo-

1962 and 1964, while

in

to the U.S. Geological

given to R. E.

McAdams and

G. E.

Burton, vice presidents of Shell Oil Company.

ARCTIC ALASKA
Bowsher and Dutro (1957) established the Kayak Shale and
Lisburne Group for exposures near Shainin Lake, Endicott

Moun-

and published the first major study of the Carboniferous
stratigraphy and faunas. They gave (p. 3) an excellent account of
the earlier history of studies and paleontology of the Carboniferous
tains,

rocks of arctic Alaska. Helen
first

Duncan (unpub.

data, 1950)

made

the

detailed study of Lisburne corals from the Endicott Mountains.

She illustrated and

listed

species of solitary rugose

and colonial

tabulate corals of Early and Late Mississippian age. She also recognized and illustrated most of the colonial lithostrotionoids that oc-

cur in the Lisburne Group.

Corals are abundant in

Group outcrops

in the

many

of the Carboniferous Lisburne

Brooks Range. These exposures (Text-figs.

1,

2) extend from the Canadian border on the east to the Chukchi Sea

on the west. The study of the Lisburne coral faunas has been made
in

conjunction with detailed analyses of Lisburne Group biostrati-

graphy, petrology, diagenesis, and environments of deposition.

The


Tài liệu bạn tìm kiếm đã sẵn sàng tải về

Tải bản đầy đủ ngay

×