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Expert podcasting practices for dummies dec 2007

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E xp er t P o dc a s t i n g
P r ac tic es
FOR

DUMmIES



by Tee Morris, Evo Terra,
and Ryan Williams



E xp er t P o dc a s t i n g
P r ac tic es
FOR

DUMmIES






E xp er t P o dc a s t i n g
P r ac tic es
FOR

DUMmIES



by Tee Morris, Evo Terra,
and Ryan Williams


Expert Podcasting Practices For Dummies®
Published by
Wiley Publishing, Inc.
111 River Street
Hoboken, NJ 07030-5774
www.wiley.com

Copyright © 2008 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana
Published by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana
Published simultaneously in Canada
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About the Authors
Tee Morris: Tee entered 2005 with an idea: podcasting a novel in order to promote its
sequel. His podcast of MOREVI: The Chronicles of Rafe & Askana went on to become the
first book podcast in its entirety and was nominated for a 2006 Parsec for Best Podcast
Fiction. Podcasting MOREVI also led to writing with Evo Terra the #1 book in podcasting,
Podcasting For Dummies. Tee’s other podcasts include the Parsec-nominated Survival
Guide to Writing Fantasy, Podcasting For Dummies, Give Us a Minute, Speaking of Beer’s
MicroBrewed with Phil Rossi, and “Behind the Mic” for Blogger and Podcaster Magazine.
He continues to podcast fiction as well with “Dear John” (from BenBella Books’s
Farscape Forever: Sex, Drugs, and Killer Muppets) for The ScapeCast; and “Asleep at the
Wheel” for the podcast anthology VOICES: New Media Fiction, edited by Mur Lafferty.
Following 2007’s Billibub Baddings and The Case of The Singing Sword podcast, Tee will
podcast Legacy of MOREVI in preparation for the 2009 print release of Exodus from
Morevi. Find out more about Tee Morris and his podcasts at www.teemorris.com.
Evo Terra: Evo Terra has a penchant for infecting others with the New Media bug. His
credits in the field include launching the premier destination for serialized audiobooks,
Podiobooks.com. A pioneer in the world of podcasting, he’s the co-author of Podcasting
For Dummies and Expert Podcasting Practices For Dummies (both published by Wiley).
His personal and professional blog, FunAnymore.com, serves as Evo’s soapbox and testing
ground, where he pontificates and proselytizes the bleeding edge of Web 2.0 applications
that are reshaping how we define “the conversation.”
Ryan Williams: Ryan Williams is a multimedia designer, author, and bassist based in
Indianapolis, Indiana. He’s shared the stage and studio with everybody and everything
from Grammy Award–winning hip-hop artists to a full band of bagpipes and drums. He’s
the author of Windows XP Digital Music For Dummies and Teach Yourself Visually Bass
Guitar (both published by Wiley). He has also written several articles and tutorials on
music and music technology for several publications and Web sites. He is the technical
editor for Second Life For Dummies and Composing Digital Music For Dummies. He is a
frequent panelist on digital music and home studios at music conferences around the
nation. He received his master’s degree in music technology from the Indiana University
School of Music in 2003.



Dedication
This book is dedicated to the life, memory, and laughter of Joe Murphy. May he live on
forever in the hearts and minds of podcasters and listeners the world over. We miss you,
Joe. (http://joemurphymemorialfund.org)

Authors’ Acknowledgments
Tee Morris: Expert Podcasting Practices For Dummies has truly been a challenge, raising
the bar for myself as a writer and a podcaster. I cannot thank Evo Terra and Ryan
Williams, my co-authors, enough for their incredible work on this title. You are only as
good as the company you keep, and I am in incredible company. This also extends
beyond the writing. Steve, Kim, Barry, and Linda (a/k/a Team Wiley) have gone to the
wall to make this title even better than its predecessor; and along with our Technical
Editor, Escape Pod’s Steve Eley, I believe we have done so. Thank you all for keeping me
honest and for keeping the book timely and concise. A huge heart-felt thank you to
Samson Technologies, Abode Systems, Audio-Technica, The Kennedy Center, The
International Spy Museum, Dancing Cat Studios, and podcasters everywhere who have
contributed their time, resources, and passion for the podosphere in helping me put all
this together. Finally, to my family and friends for weathering storms, tolerating my long
hours and deadlines, and for believing in me.
Evo Terra: I would like to thank many people for their help and support along the way
for my sophomore effort, which I found infinitely more challenging than my first book.
First, quite obviously, goes to my lovely wife Sheila and superb son NJ, for their support,
understanding, and unwavering encouragement through the entire writing process.
Second, the podcast community at large, for their enthusiasm and unending inspiration.
You have all helped to create a landscape and community that is worthy of helping to
move forward.
Finally, I would like to thank Kim and Steve from Wiley for their exceeding coolness.
They serve as shining examples of all that is right and good in the publishing world. This
book — and my involvement — certainly would not have been possible without them.
Ryan Williams: My contribution to this book would be impossible without the tireless
efforts and patience of my fellow authors, Steve Hayes, Kim Darosett, and Barry
Childs-Helton. Thanks are also due to the staff and users of Indianapolismusic.net, and
the creator of WFMU’s Downtown Soulville, maybe the finest podcast I’ve ever heard.
This book is dedicated to my wife, Jennifer. Thanks for letting me stay up late.


Publisher’s Acknowledgments
We’re proud of this book; please send us your comments through our online registration form located
at www.dummies.com/register/.
Some of the people who helped bring this book to market include the following:

Acquisitions, Editorial, and Media Development

Composition Services

Project Editor: Kim Darosett

Project Coordinator: Erin Smith

Executive Editor: Steven Hayes
Technical Editor: Stephen Eley

Layout and Graphics: Stacie Brooks, Jonelle Burns,
Carrie A. Cesavice, Shane Johnson,
Stephanie D. Jumper, Barbara Moore, Brent Savage,
Julie Trippetti, Christine Williams

Editorial Manager: Leah Cameron

Proofreaders: Melissa Buddendeck, Cynthia Fields

Media Development Project Manager: Laura Atkinson

Indexer: Potomac Indexing, LLC

Media Development Assistant Producer: Kit Malone

Anniversary Logo Design: Richard J. Pacifico

Senior Copy Editor: Barry Childs-Helton

Editorial Assistant: Amanda Foxworth
Sr. Editorial Assistant: Cherie Case
Cartoons: Rich Tennant (www.the5thwave.com)

Publishing and Editorial for Technology Dummies
Richard Swadley, Vice President and Executive Group Publisher
Andy Cummings, Vice President and Publisher
Mary Bednarek, Executive Acquisitions Director
Mary C. Corder, Editorial Director

Publishing for Consumer Dummies
Diane Graves Steele, Vice President and Publisher
Joyce Pepple, Acquisitions Director

Composition Services
Gerry Fahey, Vice President of Production Services
Debbie Stailey, Director of Composition Services


Contents at a Glance
Introduction

1

Part I: Planning Out a Podcast

7

Practice 1: Selecting the Right Topic
for Your Podcast

9

Practice 2: Keeping Up with the Joneses

14

Practice 3: Staffing Your Podcast for Success

22

Practice 4: Podcast Studio Considerations

29

Practice 5: Stick to the Script!

36

Practice 6: Transitions, Timing, and Cues

44

Practice 7: Reviewing Your Podcast
with a Critical Eye
Practice 8: T-Minus Five Episodes . . .

Practice 21: Editing Audio after Editing
the Session

171

Practice 22: Taking Your Audio File
into the Home Stretch

177

Practice 23: Creating a Perfect mp3 File

180

Practice 24: Enhanced Podcasting

185

Part IV: The Final Steps Before
Episode #0

203

Practice 25: Creating and Editing ID3 Tags

205

Practice 26: Adding a Blog to Your Podcast

213

49 Practice 27: Validating Your RSS Feed

225

55 Practice 28: Submitting to Podcast
Directories

237

Part II: Going for a Professional Sound

61

Practice 9: Upgrading Your Headphones

63

Practice 10: Selecting the Right Microphone

69

Practice 11: Upgrading Your Software

79

Practice 12: Creating a Quiet, Happy Place

89

Practice 13: Eliminating Ambient Noise

94

Part V: Building Your Audience

243

Practice 29: Creating a Promotional Plan

245

Practice 30: Tell Me About It: Recording
Promos and Quickcasts

251

Practice 31: Advertising to Attract Listeners

259

Practice 14: One-Take Wonders

105

Practice 32: Networking with Other
Podcasters and Bloggers

262

Practice 15: Multiplicity: Recording
Multiple Takes

110

Practice 33: Spreading the Word
with Social Media

266

Practice 16: Podcasting from the Road

115 Practice 234: Soliciting and Incorporating
Listener Feedback

Part III: Post-Production Approaches

125

Practice 17: Interviews from the Road

127

Practice 35: Getting Featured on Podcast
Directories

Practice 18: Setting Acceptable Sound Levels 137 Practice 36: Joining a Podcast Network

272
278
282

Practice 19: Adding Special Effects

147 Practice 237: Connecting with the Media

285

Practice 20: Adding Music

162 Practice 38: Talk to Me: Interviews

292


Practice 46: Promotional Podcasting

Part VI: Creating a Video Podcast

299

Practice 39: Video Podcasting

301 Practice 47: Adding Advertising
to Your Podcast

Practice 40: Editing Your Video Podcast
with Adobe Premiere
Practice 41: Editing Your Video Podcast
with Apple Final Cut Pro
Practice 42: Posting and Distributing
Your Video

310
325

372
377

Part VIII: Reengineering Your Podcast 387
Practice 48: Podfade Prevention

389

Practice 49: New Hosts, New Podcast?

395

341 Practice 50: Change of Passion,
Change of Podcast?

398

Part VII: Podcasting as a Business

349

Practice 51: The Hard Podfade

402

Practice 43: Deriving Revenue from
Your Podcast

351

Appendix: Bonus Content on the DVD

409

Practice 44: Corporate Podcasting

357

Index

413

Practice 45: Podcasting for Government
and Not-for-Profit Agencies

366


Table Of Contents
Introduction
About This Book
What You’re Not to Read
Foolish Assumptions
How This Book Is Organized
Part I: Planning Out a Podcast
Part II: Going for a Professional Sound
Part III: Post-Production Approaches
Part IV: The Final Steps Before Episode #0
Part V: Building Your Audience
Part VI: Creating a Video Podcast
Part VII: Podcasting as a Business
Practice VIII: Reengineering Your Podcast
Bonus Content on the DVD
Conventions Used in This Book
Icons Used in This Book
Where to Go from Here

Part I: Planning Out a Podcast
Practice 1: Selecting the Right Topic
for Your Podcast
Taking Inventory of Your Interests
List what aspects of your job interest you
Jot down what you like to do for fun
Filling a Niche by Focusing on a Specific
Area of Interest
Determining whether you’ll have enough
to talk about
Considering whether anyone will listen
Narrowing Your Focus to Make Your Show Unique
Hyperspecialization
Hyperlocalization
Broadening Your Focus to Appeal
to New Listeners
Becoming multifaceted
Tapping into the community

Practice 2: Keeping Up with the Joneses
Watching Podcast Directories
Browsing within subcategories
Wading through listings
Performing keyword searches

1
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
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4
4
4
4
5

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9
9
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12

14
14
15
15
16

Successful Searching Strategies
Google
Blog-specific search engines
Podcast-specific search engines
Managing Information Overload
Using newsreaders
Tagging with del.icio.us
Skimming podcasts
Staying Connected to the Offline World

Practice 3: Staffing Your Podcast
for Success
Choosing the Right Host
Taking the host’s location into account
Making sure the host has the know-how
Assessing the host’s vocal talent
Choosing the Support Staff
Producers
Writers
Engineers
Designers
Other roles

16
16
16
17
18
18
19
21
21

22
22
23
23
24
24
25
25
26
27
28

Practice 4: Podcast Studio Considerations

29

Designing a Studio with Built-in Flexibility
Planning for hosts or guests
Investing in gear that will serve you well
today — and tomorrow
Offering additional services from your studio
Location, Location, Location: Podcasting
from a Room in Your Home
Studio in the upstairs office
Studio in the basement
Unconventional Options for Your Studio
Podcasting in a closet
Podcasting to the blanket
Podcasting in the great outdoors
A Professional Look for a Professional Sound
Tidiness in the studio
Tidiness in the home
Studio at the ready

29
29
30
30
30
31
31
32
32
32
33
33
33
34
34


xii

Expert Podcasting Practices For Dummies
36

Practice 8: T-Minus Five Episodes . . .

55

Of Intros and Outros
36
Why intros and outros are important
36
Finding the right music or sounds
37
Creating a Standard Voiceover for Your Show
37
Giving out general show info
37
Handling attributions
38
Providing contact and more information
38
Middle Management: Planning the Main Part of Your
Show
39
Sticking to a theme
39
Writing a script or preparing show notes
40
Setting time limits for segments
41
Incorporating interviews
42
Writing for Your Podcast
42

The Blog: Your Personal Hype Machine
Setting up a blog
Posting about your podcast on your blog
Does It Have to Be Five Episodes?

55
56
56
58

Practice 5: Stick to the Script!

Practice 6: Transitions, Timing, and Cues
Making Transitions with Bumpers and Rejoiners
Rejoiners
Bumpers
Using them in your show
Pauses Are a Good Thing
Using Signals and Signs to Keep the Conversation
Flowing Smoothly
Fade In, Fade Out

Practice 7: Reviewing Your Podcast
with a Critical Eye
Accessing Audio Quality
Finding problems
Deciding whether to fix them
Finding the Perfect Length for Your Show
Easy answer: 20–40 minutes
Hard answer: As short as it possibly can be
Bite-size, snack-size, and meal-size content
Strive for consistency in whatever standard
length you choose
Critiquing the Content of Your Show
Evaluating Your Supporting Materials
mp3 files
RSS feed
Web site

44
44
45
45
45
45
46
47

49
49
50
50
51
51
51
52
52
53
53
54
54
54

Part II: Going for a Professional Sound 61
Practice 9: Upgrading Your Headphones
Why Focus on Headphones?
Before You Jump for Those $300 Headphones . . .
What to Look for in Headphones
Closed-ear headsets
Frequency response
Impedance
Listen Up!
Samson CH700 ($40 USD)
Koss UR-40 Collapsible Headphones ($50 USD)
Audio-Technica ATH-D40fs ($71 USD)

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64
64
65
65
65
65
66
67

Practice 10: Selecting the Right Microphone 69
Choosing the Best Microphone FOR YOU
Taking into account where you’ll use the mic
Doing your research
Staying within your budget
My Mama Told Me, “You Better Shop Around”
Radio Shack Unidirectional Dynamic
Microphone ($30–$40 USD)
Marshall Electronics MXL990 ($60 USD)
AKG Perception 100 ($100 USD) and
200 ($160 USD)
Samson Technologies C01U
Recording Pak ($170 USD)
Final thoughts
Can I Take This Mic for a Test Cast?
Turning to Podcasts for Insight into Mics
(And Other Audio Gear)

Practice 11: Upgrading Your Software
Working Beyond Audacity
Working Beyond GarageBand
Looking at the Major-League Players
Adobe Audition
Apple Soundtrack Pro

69
70
72
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75
76
77
77

79
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80
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83


Table of Contents
Bias Peak Pro
Adobe Soundbooth
Deciding Whether to Upgrade

84
85
88

Practice 12: Creating a Quiet, Happy Place

89

Common Sources of Unwanted Ambient Noise
Planes, trains, and automobiles
Creature comforts
Children
Computer equipment and accessories
The Podcaster’s Feng Shui
Relocating your computer
Reducing your desk accessories
Trying a “comforting” solution
Timing Is Everything
Patience, Patience, Patience: Waiting
Out the Noise

89
90
90
90
90
91
91
92
92
93

Practice 13: Eliminating Ambient Noise
Removing Unwanted Noise with a Noise Gate
Setting up
Setting your gate
Adjusting the gate
Reducing Noise in Post-Production
Using Audition
Using Soundtrack Pro
Using built-in noise-reduction filters:
Too good to be true?
The Best Noise-Reduction Device: You!
Take control of what you can
Noise reduction in recording versus
noise reduction in post-production

Practice 14: One-Take Wonders
And You’re Recording! (Good Luck.
You’ll Need It.)
The Method in the One-Take Madness
So what are you going to say?
Working with notes and scripts
Pacing your podcast
Recording in segments
What You Gain with One-Take Recording

93

94
94
95
96
98
100
100
102

xiii

Practice 15: Multiplicity: Recording
Multiple Takes
Multiple Takes: Variety Is the Spice of Life
(And Podcasting)
Learning Tricks in the Take
The Demands of Multiple Takes
Understanding the Advantages of Multiple Takes
Deciding Whether the Investment Is
Worth It for You

Practice 16: Podcasting from the Road
Portable Podcasting: The Good, the Bad,
and the Ugly
Seizing the podcasting opportunity
Finding the right setting
The trade-off between recording in studio
and recording remotely
Taking Your Show on the Road
iRiver: The podcaster’s necktie
The M-Audio MobilePre: Your recording studio
as carry-on luggage
The Zoom H4: The best of both worlds
Could You Keep It Down?! I’m Podcasting!

104

105
105
106
106
107
107
108
109

110
111
112
113
114

115
115
116
116
117
117
117
119
120
122

Part III: Post-Production Approaches 125
Practice 17: Interviews from the Road

103
104
104

110

Introducing a “Live on Location” Interview
Recording your interview’s intro
Recording the segue to the introduction
Working with VoIP: The Voice of a New Generation
Using Skype
Using SkypeOut
Using Skype and third-party recorders
Improving Sound Quality on the Road
Riding the board
Using Levelator
Inserting Breaks into an Interview
Wrapping Up Your Interview

127
127
128
128
129
129
131
132
133
133
134
135
135


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Expert Podcasting Practices For Dummies

Practice 18: Setting Acceptable
Sound Levels
Controlling Volume: All the Gains in Stages
The microphone
Computer mixers
Sound-recording program
Working with External Devices
External preamps
Compressors and limiters
Software plug-ins
Level It Out
First things first
Setting music levels

Practice 19: Adding Special Effects
Adding in Foley Effects and Filters
Applying basic sound effects to audio
Adding ambiance to the scene
Setting levels
Adding the final touches
Where Else Can I Find All These Cool
Special Effects?
Online searches and Web sites
Freesound Project
SoundSnap
SoundDogs
Digital Juice
D.I.Y.
Can I See Your License for These
Special Effects, Sir?
End-User License Agreements
Demystifying Digital Juice’s license agreement
Too Much of a Good Thing Is . . . Too Much

Practice 20: Adding Music
Where to Find Good Music
Magnatune
Podsafe Music Network
Digital Juice
Independent Musicians: Creating a Synergy
Ask for permission
Confirm the proper contact
Pay it forward once permission is granted
The Method to Mixing Music with Dialogue
Fair Use 101: What Is and Isn’t “Fair”
in Podcasting

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162
163
164
166
167
167
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169

Practice 21: Editing Audio after
Editing the Session
Choosing the Format for Your Audio File
Keep it uncompressed to make it
larger than life
Uncompressed file types: Wave and AIFF
Sample rates
Exporting Your Goods
Exporting with Soundtrack Pro
Rendering the file
Making Edits: The First Cut Is the Deepest
Performing a nip and tuck
Moving sections around
Erasing the silence

Practice 22: Taking Your Audio File
into the Home Stretch
Listening with a New Ear
The Finishing Touches
Even out the sound with gentle
compression settings
Controlling high peaks with a limiter
Pump It Up
Normalization
Adjust Amplitude
One More Time, with Feeling

171
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179

Practice 23: Creating a Perfect mp3 File

180

Crunching the Numbers
Bit rate
Sample rate
Constant and variable bit rate
Preaching to the Converted
Media players
Specific conversion programs
Exporting your goods to an mp3 file
Examining Other Formats
AAC
WMA
Switching back and forth between formats

180
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184
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184

Practice 24: Enhanced Podcasting
What Is an Enhanced Podcast?
Enhancements with a Cost

185
185
186


Table of Contents
Reasons Why You May Want to
Enhance a Podcast
On-the-job training
Education
Soundseeing tours with visuals
Seminars and guest symposiums
Product reviews
Maintaining Two Feeds to Reach a
Wider Audience
Creating Enhanced Podcasts in GarageBand 3
Prep work for the enhanced podcast
Building the basic podcast
Enhancing the podcast with images
Adding final touches to your enhanced podcast
Creating Enhanced Podcasts in Podcast Maker
Building the basic podcast
Creating chapters and adding images
Adding e-mail and Web links

Part IV: The Final Steps
Before Episode #0
Practice 25: Creating and Editing ID3 Tags
The Miracle of ID3 Tags
What they do
Why they matter
Tagging the Files and Editing the Tags
The Essential Tags
Album
Artist
Comment
Genre
Name
Image
Additional Important Tags
Compilation
Grouping
Track Number
Year
The Best Laid Plans . . .

Practice 26: Adding a Blog to Your Podcast
Why Use a Blog to Host Your Podcast?

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213

Blogging Solutions for Podcasters
Blogger
MySpace
Movable Type
WordPress
Podcasting with WordPress
Installing and Configuring the PodPress Plug-in
Stats tab
Feed/iTunes Settings tab
General Settings tab
Player Settings tab
Adding a Media File with PodPress
Adding the media file
Testing
FeedBurner Feed Replacement Plug-in
WP-Cache Plug-in

xv
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Practice 27: Validating Your RSS Feed

225

RSS Deconstructed
RSS Reconstructed
Header information
Channel information
Item Information
Avoiding Pitfalls
Special characters
Duplicate s
File size
Dates and times
No media files in the feed
Stop Worrying: Validate Your Feed Often

226
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233
234
234
235
235
236

Practice 28: Submitting to Podcast
Directories
Submitting Your Application
RSS feed
E-mail and Web site
Show information
Getting Listed in the Virtual Yellow Pages
iTunes
Podcast Alley
Podcast Pickle
Checking Directory Sites Regularly

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xvi

Expert Podcasting Practices For Dummies

Part V: Building Your Audience

243

Practice 29: Creating a Promotional Plan
Deciding When to Begin Promoting Your Podcast
Building excitement prior to launch
Examining two real-life promotional
campaigns
Why Promoting Before Episode #0 Is Beneficial
Would You Play My Promo if I Asked Nicely?
Target podcasts that reach your
target audience
Send promos only to podcasts that
welcome promos
Pay it forward
Invite other podcasters to help
with your promos
Cast your promos out to wider audiences

Practice 30: Tell Me About It: Recording
Promos and Quickcasts
What Is a Promo?
The 30-second promo: Short and sweet
The one-minute promo: Fun and informative
The 1-minute-30-second promo: Are you sure
you want to say that much?
Why two minutes is too long
My Name Is Tee, and This Is My Podcast . . .
Who you are
What the podcast is about
Where listeners can find this podcast
And sometimes, why . . .
What Is a Quickcast?
Two-to-three-minute quickcast: Welcome,
friends!
Five-to-ten-minute quickcast: Proceed
with permission
Quickcast over ten minutes: Whose podcast
is it, anyway?

245
245
246
246
247
248
249
249
249
249
250

251
251
252
252
252
253
253
253
253
253
254
254
255
256
257

Practice 31: Advertising to Attract Listeners 259
A Banner Day
Size
Type of media
Page views
Money in Stereo: Audio Ads
Advertising in News Publications
Hitting the Streets

259
260
260
260
260
261
261

Practice 32: Networking with Other
Podcasters and Bloggers
Communicating with Others in a Forum
Listen (or read) up!
Search for a common topic before posting
Offer a quick introduction
Respect yourself and others
Spam isn’t just for dinner
Taking it from there
Contacting the Authors Directly
Questions and Comments

Practice 33: Spreading the Word
with Social Media
Getting the Word Out through Social Networks
Bulletins, blogs, and comments
A MySpace site for your podcast
Video sites
Using Bookmarking to Promote Your Podcast
Virtually Promoting Your Podcast

Practice 34: Soliciting and Incorporating
Listener Feedback
Is Your Show “Feedbackable?”
Encouraging Your Listeners to Provide Feedback
E-mail
Voicemail
Comments on your blog
Forum posts
Adding Feedback as a Show Element
Responding to feedback during your show
Managing feedback overload
Keeping Track of Conversations Off Your Site

Practice 35: Getting Featured
on Podcast Directories
Making Your Numbers Count
Your podcast
Your Web site and blog
Social networks and bookmarks
Two Thumbs Up!
Building Bridges

262
262
263
263
263
264
264
264
264
265

266
266
266
268
269
269
271

272
272
273
273
274
274
275
276
276
276
277

278
278
278
278
279
280
280


Practice 36: Joining a Podcast Network
Finding the Right Network for Your Podcast
What Your Network Can Do for You
What You Can (And Must) Do for Your Network
Making the Decision

Practice 37: Connecting with the Media
Writing Press Releases
Title
Introductory paragraph
The body paragraph
The closing paragraph
Making Cold Calls
Do your homework
Script out and rehearse what you
are going to say
Don’t get discouraged
Be ready to talk
Remember whose time you are taking up
Don’t take rejection personally
Creating an Effective Press Kit
The essentials
Extras you may want to include
The Follow-Up
The same-day follow-up: Proceed with caution
Same-week follow-up: A happy medium
The week-after follow-up: You are who again?
The frequency of the follow-ups

Practice 38: Talk to Me: Interviews
The Interview Query
On the street: Guerrilla journalism
Scheduled interviews: “Do you have
30 minutes?”
Formal interview queries: Marking
your calendar
Legal Releases: Podcasting Paperwork
Finding Good Interview Subjects
Establishing contacts
Attending special events and conventions
Making direct contact via the Internet
Interviewing Unconventional Experts

Table of Contents

xvii

282 Part VI: Creating a Video Podcast

299

282
283
283
284

285
285
285
286
286
286
287
287
287
288
288
288
288
288
289
289
290
290
290
291
291

292
292
292
293
295
295
296
296
296
297
297

Practice 39: Video Podcasting
Understanding the Demands of a Video Podcast
Lighting
Set and wardrobe
On-screen persona and appearance
Podcast file size
Bandwidth demands
Giving Yourself Enough Time to Produce
Exploring Studio Accessories for
Video Podcasting
Lighting fixtures
Digital recorders
Tripods
Shooting schedules
When to Say, “That’s a Wrap!”

Practice 40: Editing Your Video Podcast
with Adobe Premiere
Editing Video in Adobe Premiere Pro
Getting the files for the video podcast
Taking the first steps with Premiere Pro
Finishing the video portion of the introduction
Adding titles
Animating the title
Adding the final touches
Exporting Your Video for Podcasting

Practice 41: Editing Your Video Podcast
with Apple Final Cut Pro
Editing Video with Final Cut Pro
Getting ready to edit the video podcast
Laying the foundation of your video
with Final Cut Pro
Finishing the video portion of the introduction
Adding titles
Animating your title
Adding the final touches with Final Cut
Exporting Your Video for Podcasting

301
301
302
303
303
304
305
305
305
306
306
307
308
308

310
310
311
312
314
316
318
318
322

325
325
326
327
330
332
334
335
340


xviii

Expert Podcasting Practices For Dummies

Practice 42: Posting and Distributing
Your Video
Distribution through Your Feed
Posting on YouTube
Uploading your video to YouTube
Embedding your YouTube video on your blog
Posting on Google Video
Embedding Your Google Video on Your Blog
Posting on Lulu TV

Part VII: Podcasting as a Business
Practice 43: Deriving Revenue
from Your Podcast
Making Money “from” Your Podcast
Advertising
Direct sales
Affiliates
Making Money “Because of” Your Podcast
Promoting yourself
Showcasing your skills
Becoming a consultant

Practice 44: Corporate Podcasting
Great Expectations for Your Company’s Podcast
Making your case to management
Choosing the right equipment for
your company’s budget
Coloring within Corporate Lines
Corporate image
Corporate policy
The professional attitude
Working with IT
Working with Marketing and PR
Knowing Your Audience
Stockholders and executives
Company employees
The general public

Practice 45: Podcasting for Government
and Not-for-Profit Agencies
Why Government and NFP Agencies
Should Podcast
Training
Current events and announcements

341
341
342
343
343
344
345
347

349
351
352
352
353
354
355
355
355
356

357
357
358
358
360
361
361
361
362
363
364
364
365
365

366
366
367
367

Public relations
Outreach programs
Working within Government Guidelines
Doing your homework
Considering workarounds
Keeping your eyes on the prize

367
368
368
369
369
370

Practice 46: Promotional Podcasting

372

Examining What Goes into the
Promotional Podcast
Making Sure You Have a Plan for Your Promo
Show’s Over — Nothing More to See Here

Practice 47: Adding Advertising
to Your Podcast
Measuring Audience Demographics
Determining the size of your audience
Profiling your audience
Building a Media Kit
Establishing a Fair Rate
Creating an Advertising Plan
Pre-/post-rolls
Interstitial ads
Host endorsements
Site takeovers
Creating an Insertion Order
Handling Listener Complaints
Does This Make You “Commercial”?

Part VIII: Reengineering
Your Podcast
Practice 48: Podfade Prevention
Factors That Contribute to Podfading
Time
Effort
Personal matters
The Honeymooners Syndrome
Taking a Break
Reconnecting with Your Passion
Why you may need to go on hiatus
What to do during your break
It’s a Great Idea for a Podcast, but . . .

372
373
374

377
377
378
378
380
380
381
381
382
383
383
383
384
385

387
389
389
390
390
390
390
391
391
391
392
393


Table of Contents
Practice 49: New Hosts, New Podcast?

395

Heading Toward the Door
We’d Like to Introduce to You . . .
Taking a Step Back to Re-evaluate the Show
Incorporating Changes to Your Show

395
396
396
397

Practice 50: Change of Passion,
Change of Podcast?

398

Performing an Annual Evaluation
Time
Effort
New subject matter
Who’s Counting on You?
Podcasting co-workers
Advertisers
Your boss and company
Listeners
Time for an Overhaul
Changing the podcast itself
Back to square one
Drawing a New Crowd
Targeting a new audience
Mixing the old and the new

398
398
399
399
399
399
400
400
400
400
400
401
401
401
401

Practice 51: The Hard Podfade

xix
402

No Announcement, No More Show
Good Night, and Good Luck
The farewell episode
The blog-post farewell
The Yard Sale: Selling Your Podcast Rigs
Your papers, please . . .
Selling your sound supply
Handling with care and confirmation

402
403
403
405
405
405
406
407

Appendix: Bonus Content on the DVD

409

System Requirements
Using the DVD
What You’ll Find on the DVD
Podcast audio
Podcast video
Sample media kits
Podcast XML template
Sample files
Links galore!
Troubleshooting
Customer Care

Index

409
410
410
410
410
410
411
411
411
411
411

413



Introduction

T

o put it bluntly, all of us — from authors to editors — are a bit
uncomfortable with the “Expert” part of this title. Not because of
any lack of experience on the part of your authors, but because of
the do-it-yourself — and (perhaps more importantly) do-it-your-way —
nature of podcasting. To quote Daniel Quinn, “there is no one right way”
to make a podcast. In fact, many of the most popular podcasts (and you
can measure popularity in a variety of ways) ignore or break the rules of
just about every practice we discuss in this book. But while there may be
no one right way to make a podcast, we’ve tried to fill this book with a
series of best practices — which are certainly among the right ways to do
specific podcasting-related tasks.
At the time of this publication, Podcasting For Dummies has been on the
shelves for just over two years. While that book helped many people get
started in podcasting, a need has arisen to go beyond what the first book
covers. For many, starting a podcast is the easy part. It’s the Now what?
question that plagues many who seek to take their existing podcasts to
the next level.
We hope this book can answer that question, providing a few paths —
some well-trodden and some relatively uncharted — toward success.
Having said that, your authors are staunch supporters of the Law of
Multiple Success Variables, which we just made up. It states, both basically and in its entirety, that every podcaster will have his or her own
metrics of success, and that the merits of one cannot and should not be
judged by those of another. Podcasting isn’t broadcasting. It’s not radio,
TV, or any other form of mainstream media that came before. It is a difficult form of media to describe to your grandmother and likely to be misunderstood by your peers. Its very amorphous nature is what keeps its
fans and creators coming back for more.
With a little luck, some judicious planning, and the wise decision to
implement some of these practices in your podcasting, we hope to move
the needle higher on your own metrics of success. Enjoy.


2

Introduction

About This Book
This book is written for — and by — podcasters.
It’s filled with a series of practices, tips, tools, and
techniques designed to take your podcast “to the
next level” — whatever the heck that means to you.
By its very nature, a podcast can be many things to
many different people. We understand that and have
tried very hard to assemble practices that are helpful to the widest possible audience of podcasters.
We cover a lot of technical territory in this book,
from choosing better headphones to switching to
a video-podcasting format. We also help define the
softer side of podcasting — helping you understand
your options for scripting and providing suggestions
for generating more audience interaction. Yet we’re
not afraid to take on the heavier issues, and we offer
some definite opinions on advertising, networks,
and the ever-present issue of podfading (disappearing from the podosphere — yes, it does happen).
While we don’t promise to answer all possible questions in this book, we do provide a lot of perspective
for the podcaster looking to break new ground, try
new things, or even breathe new life into a floundering project. Some advice is very specific, some much
more general. But all of it — we hope — will be of use
to someone wishing to make a podcast even better.

What You’re Not to Read
While most For Dummies books aren’t necessarily
designed to be read from front to back, that goes
doubly well for this book. So in case it wasn’t clear
before, you have our permission to skip entire practices — or even parts — if they don’t apply to you.
We’ve tucked lots of cross-references into the book,
so you shouldn’t miss anything important.
You may notice a few sidebars in gray text throughout the book. These are more like anecdotes and
asides than independent content. They’re for adding

clarity, dimension, and the occasional example to
topics discussed in the text. While we’re positive the
writing is as brilliant as we are modest, you can skip
them without fear of offending us — or missing anything terribly important.

Foolish Assumptions
As stated earlier, we’re working under the impression that you are familiar with the basics of podcasting. In a perfect world, you’re already a podcaster
and don’t need us to define terms like RSS or guide
you through your first time FTPing a file to a server.
We figure you won’t be puzzled if you’re looking at a
wave form for the first time. If that gives you pause,
then allow us to highly recommend picking up a
copy of our first book, Podcasting For Dummies,
where all of that lovely stuff — and much more —
gets covered at an appropriate level of detail.
Beyond that, we assume you are a generally curious
person who’s familiar with the basics of getting new
programs installed on your computer, signing up for
online services, and adapting broad instructions to
your specific environment. As with any For Dummies
book, you get step-by-step instructions where
they’re called for, without having to endure somebody talking down to you. Of course, in keeping with
the “Expert” part of our book title, we sometimes
start the hand-holding a bit further along in the
process. We figure you’ve already got a handle on
the simple, up-front stuff.

How This Book Is Organized
As stated earlier, this book offers a series of distinct
practices, provided in a loosely linear fashion. Each
practice is designed to be read by itself, with any
necessary and relevant cross-references added.
Similar practices are clustered together in parts that
move (generally speaking) from relatively basic to
relatively advanced.


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