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Professional

Application Lifecycle
Management
with Visual Studio® 2010
Mickey Gousset, Brian Keller, Ajoy Krishnamoorthy, Martin Woodward
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PROFESSIONAL
APPLICATION LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT
WITH VISUAL STUDIO ® 2010
INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxix

PART I

ARCHITECT

CHAPTER 1

Introduction to Software Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3


CHAPTER 2

Top-down Design with Use Case Diagrams, Activity Diagrams,
and Sequence Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

CHAPTER 3

Top-down Design with Component and Class Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

CHAPTER 4

Analyzing Applications Using Architecture Explorer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

CHAPTER 5

Using Layer Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81

PART II

DEVELOPER

CHAPTER 6

Introduction to Software Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95

CHAPTER 7

Unit Testing with the Unit Test Framework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99

CHAPTER 8

Managed Code Analysis and Code Metrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139

CHAPTER 9

Profiling and Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167

CHAPTER 10

Database Development, Testing, and Deployment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201

CHAPTER 11

Introduction to IntelliTrace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243

PART III

TESTER

CHAPTER 12

Introduction to Software Testing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259

CHAPTER 13

Web Performance and Load Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277

CHAPTER 14

Manual Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319

CHAPTER 15

Coded User Interface Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339

CHAPTER 16

Lab Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357
Continues

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PART IV TEAM FOUNDATION SERVER
CHAPTER 17

Introduction to Team Foundation Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379

CHAPTER 18

Team Foundation Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 405

CHAPTER 19

Team Foundation Version Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 423

CHAPTER 20

Branching and Merging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 447

CHAPTER 21

Team Foundation Build . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .471

PART V

PROJECT/PROCESS MANAGEMENT

CHAPTER 22

Introduction to Project Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521

CHAPTER 23

Process Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 549

CHAPTER 24

Using Reports, Portals, and Dashboards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 571

CHAPTER 25

Agile Planning Using Planning Workbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 599

CHAPTER 26

Process Template Customizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 615

INDEX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 633

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PROFESSIONAL

Application Lifecycle Management
with Visual Studio® 2010

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PROFESSIONAL

Application Lifecycle Management
with Visual Studio® 2010
Mickey Gousset
Brian Keller
Ajoy Krishnamoorthy
Martin Woodward

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Professional Application Lifecycle Management with Visual Studio® 2010
Published by
Wiley Publishing, Inc.
10475 Crosspoint Boulevard
Indianapolis, IN 46256
www.wiley.com
Copyright © 2010 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana
Published simultaneously in Canada
ISBN: 978-0-470-48426-5
Manufactured in the United States of America
10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means,
electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning or otherwise, except as permitted under Sections 107 or 108
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This book is dedicated to my wife, Amye Gousset.
Once again, I scratched the itch to write, and once
again, she provided me all the love and support I
needed to make it happen. Amye, I love you more and
more each day.
— Mickey Gousset

This book is dedicated to my parents, Ray and Sue
Ellen Keller, who laid the foundation for me to
embark upon a lifetime of learning and a love of
technology. As a kid, they let me hijack the family
computer to teach myself how to program, and as a
young adult, they gave me the inspiration to explore
my passions, and the freedom to learn from my
failures. Mom and Dad, I love you.
— Brian Keller

I dedicate this book to my best friend and my wife,
Vidhya, and our wonderful children, Atul and Aditi.
Thank you for everything.
— Ajoy Krishnamoorthy

To Catherine, William, and Jamie.
— Martin Woodward

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ABOUT THE AUTHORS

MICKEY GOUSSET is a Senior Technical Developer for Infront Consulting Group, a

consulting company focused on the Microsoft System Center family of products.
He has been a Microsoft Team System MVP five years running, a certified professional
in Team Foundation Server and SCOM 2007, and co-author (along with Jean-Luc
David and Erik Gunvaldson) of the book Professional Team Foundation Server
(Indianapolis: Wiley, 2006). Gousset runs “Team System Rocks!” (http://www.teamsystemrocks
.com), a community site devoted to Visual Studio Team System and Visual Studio 2010, where he
also blogs about Visual Studio and Team Foundation Server. He is also a co-host of the popular Team
Foundation Server podcast, “Radio TFS” (http://www.radiotfs.com). He has spoken on Visual
Studio and Team Foundation Server topics at various user groups, code camps, and conferences,
including Microsoft Tech Ed Developer — North America 2008 and 2009. When not writing or
working with computers, Mickey enjoys a range of hobbies, from playing on Xbox Live (“Gamer
Tag: HereBDragons”) to participating in local community theater. Nothing beats his favorite pastime
though — sitting on his couch with his lovely wife Amye, and their two Chihuahuas, Lucy and Linus.
BRIAN KELLER is a Senior Technical Evangelist for Microsoft, specializing in Visual

Studio and application lifecycle management. Keller has been with Microsoft
since 2002, and has presented at conferences all over the world, including TechEd,
Professional Developers Conference (PDC), and MIX. Keller is also a regular
personality on MSDN’s Channel 9 Web site, and is co-host of the popular show,
“This Week on Channel 9.” Outside of work, he can usually be found enjoying the great outdoors
while either rock climbing, backpacking, skiing, or surfi ng.
AJOY KRISHNAMOORTHY is a Senior Product Manager in the Microsoft Patterns

and Practices group. In this role, he focuses on planning the areas of investments
and business strategy for Patterns and Practices. Prior to this role, Krishnamoorthy
worked as a Senior Product Manager for Microsoft Visual Studio Team System. He
has more than ten years of consulting experience, playing variety of roles, including
developer, architect, and technical project manager. Krishnamoorthy has written articles for online
and printed magazines, and co-authored several books on ASP.NET. You can check out his blog
at http://blogs.msdn.com/ajoyk. Krishnamoorthy has an MBA from Ohio State University.
Any spare time is spent with his family, playing board/card games with friends, watching sports
(especially when the Ohio State Buckeyes are playing), and learning to play “Tabla.”
MARTIN WOODWARD is currently the Program Manager for the Microsoft Visual

Studio Team Foundation Server Cross-Platform Tools Team. Before joining Microsoft,
Woodward was voted Team System MVP of the Year, and has spoken about Team
Foundation Server at events internationally. Not only does Woodward bring a unique
insight into the inner workings of the product he has experienced from more than a
half-decade of real-world use at companies big and small, he is also always happy to share. When not
working or speaking, Woodward can be found at his blog, http://www.woodwardweb.com.

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CREDITS

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

PRODUCTION MANAGER

Robert Elliott

Tim Tate

DEVELOPMENT EDITOR

VICE PRESIDENT AND EXECUTIVE
GROUP PUBLISHER

Kevin Shafer

Richard Swadley
TECHNICAL EDITORS

Siddharth Bhatia
Justin Marks
Peter Provost
Mario Rodriguez
Clark Sell
David Williamson

VICE PRESIDENT AND EXECUTIVE PUBLISHER

Barry Pruett
ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Jim Minatel
PROJECT COORDINATOR, COVER

Lynsey Stanford

PRODUCTION EDITOR

Rebecca Anderson
COVER DESIGNER

Michael E. Trent

COPY EDITOR

Christopher Jones
COVER PHOTO

© Ben Blankenburg/istockphoto

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Robyn B. Siesky
PROOFREADERS

Mary Beth Wakefield

Scott Klemp, Maraya Cornell,
Carrie Hunter, Word One

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF MARKETING

INDEXER

David Mayhew

J & J Indexing

EDITORIAL MANAGER

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

FIRST OFF, I WANT TO THANK AJOY, BRIAN, AND MARTIN for taking this journey with me. You have

been incredible people to work with, and have truly made this a great experience. I’d like to thank
everyone at Wiley and Wrox, specifically Bob Elliot and Kevin Shafer, our editors. This book could
not have happened without their help and constant attention to detail. We also had some amazing
people doing technical edits on this book, including Clark Sell, Peter Provost, Siddharth Bhatia,
Mario Rodriguez, Justin Marks, David Williamson, and I’m sure many other names that I’ve
overlooked. To everyone who has helped to make this book the great product that it is, I thank you.
Finally, a big thank you to my family for your understanding, love, and support during the late
nights and long weekends when I disappeared into my office to write.

— Mickey Gousset
THE EFFORTS OF SO MANY PEOPLE went into the realization of this book that it’s hard to know
where to begin. Perhaps most fundamentally is the work of the engineering team within Microsoft’s
developer division, who have an insatiable drive for shipping great software that helps other
software development teams around the world realize their full potential. Visual Studio 2010 is an
incredibly exciting release, and is the inspiration for this book. David Williamson was the primary
technical reviewer for the chapters I contributed, and his thoughtful suggestions contributed greatly
to the quality of this book. I also received help from Anutthara Bharadwaj, Daryush Laqab, Ed
Glas, Euan Garden, Gautam Goenka, Habib Heydarian, Katrina Lyon-Smith, Mark Mydland,
Michael Rigler, Tanuj Vohra, Ted Malone, Vinod Malhotra, and scores of others over the last year
and a half. Finally, I would like to thank our publisher and my co-authors, who I am proud to share
this accomplishment with.

—Brian Keller
I OWE A BIG THANKS TO MY good friend Jean-Luc David for his persistence in getting me to work

on this book. I was fortunate to have the chance to work with a talented team of fellow authors.
Mickey, Brian and Martin, thank you, and I truly enjoyed working with you on this book.
Several members of the Visual Studio team offered their help, and I am thankful for that. I owe a lot
of gratitude to Aaron Bjork, Siddharth Bhatia, John Socha-Leialoha, Sunder Raman, David Brokaw,
Gokula Thilagar, Habib Heydarian, Justin Marks, and Brad Sullivan. They were all busy shipping
a product, but never hesitated to help me when I reached them with questions, or needed more
information and access to pre-release bits. Thanks to every one of you for your timely help.
I want to thank my manager John deVadoss and my colleagues at Patterns and Practices for their
great support and encouragement throughout the course of this writing project.

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Finally, I can’t thank my family enough for allowing me to spend countless hours during evenings
and weekends on this book. Vidhya, Atul, and Aditi, none of this would have been possible without
your encouragement, support, and understanding. I have missed several rounds of board games,
trips to the play area, bed-time routines, and more. I promise you that I will do the best to make up
for the lost time. Thank you for everything.

— Ajoy Krishnamoorthy
I WOULD LIKE TO ACKNOWLEDGE THE HELP, advice, and assistance from the people both inside and

outside the Visual Studio team at Microsoft. Special thanks go to Aaron Hallberg, Brian Randell,
Buck Hodges, Clark Sell, Jim Lamb, Julie MacAller, Mario Rodriguez, Matthew Mitrik, and
William Bartholomew, without whom my contributions to this book would not have been possible.
Thanks also to Rob Caron, Jeff Beehler, Brian Harry, Doug Neumann, Eric Sink, and Corey Steffen
for encouraging my involvement in the Visual Studio community over the past five years.
I would like to thank my co-authors for bringing me into this project, and for helping me fulfill
a lifetime ambition of writing a book. I would also like to thank my dad, Roy Woodward, and
my much missed mum, Val Woodward. They got me started down this whole computing path by
getting me a Vic-20 at the age of 6, and got me a typewriter at the age of 8. With that sort of start,
you’d think I’d have written a computer book at the age of 10, but instead I re-wrote “Ghostbusters”
and co-authored a novel about a pink sofa. Well Mum — I got there in the end.
Last but not least, I would also like to thank my wife, Catherine, for her encouragement and support,
and for helping me fi nd the time to write this book in our already busy lives. She has heard the
phrase, “I’m nearly done, just fi nishing this last bit up,” more times than anyone deserves, yet,
bizarrely, has still not figured out that she is way out of my league.

— Martin Woodward

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CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

xxix

PART I: ARCHITECT
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION TO SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE

Designing Visually
Microsoft’s Modeling Strategy
Understanding Model-Driven Development
Understanding Domain-Specific Languages

From Objects to Services

3

3
4
5
6

7

Understanding Objects and Compile-Time Reuse
Understanding Components and Deploy-Time Reuse
Understanding Distributed Components and Run-Time Reuse
Distributed Services and the Service-Oriented Architecture

New Architecture Tools in Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate
Use Case Diagrams
Activity Diagrams
Sequence Diagrams
Component Diagrams
Class Diagrams
Layer Diagrams
Architecture Explorer

7
8
9
10

10
11
11
12
13
13
13
14

Summary

15

CHAPTER 2: TOP-DOWN DESIGN WITH USE CASE DIAGRAMS,
ACTIVITY DIAGRAMS, AND SEQUENCE DIAGRAMS

Use Case Diagrams

17

18

Understanding a Use Case Diagram
Use Case Diagram Toolbox
Creating a Use Case Diagram

Activity Diagrams

18
20
20

22

Understanding an Activity Diagram
Activity Diagram Toolbox

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22
25


CONTENTS

Creating an Activity Diagram
Adding an Activity Diagram to a Use Case Diagram

Sequence Diagrams

26
27

28

Understanding Sequence Diagrams
Sequence Diagram Toolbox
Creating a Sequence Diagram

Summary

28
29
30

31

CHAPTER 3: TOP-DOWN DESIGN WITH COMPONENT
AND CLASS DIAGRAMS

Component Diagrams

33

34

Understanding a Component Diagram
Component Diagram Toolbox
Component Diagram Element Properties
Creating a Component Diagram
Showing Internal Component Parts

Class Diagrams

34
36
37
38
43

46

Understanding a Class Diagram
Class Diagram Toolbox
Class Diagram Type Properties
Class Diagram Attribute Properties
Class Diagram Operations Properties
Class Diagram Association Properties
Creating a Class Diagram

Summary

47
48
49
51
52
53
55

58

CHAPTER 4: ANALYZING APPLICATIONS USING
ARCHITECTURE EXPLORER

Understanding the Code Base
Architecture Explorer Basics
Understanding the Architecture Explorer Window
Architecture Explorer Options
Navigating Through Architecture Explorer
Exploring Options for Namespaces
Exploring Options for Classes
Exploring Options for Members
Architecture Explorer Queries

Dependency Graphs

59

60
61
61
62
62
64
66
68
69

71

Creating the First Dependency Graph
Creating a Dependency Graph without Architecture Explorer
Navigating Through Your Dependency Graph
Dependency Graph Legend
xvi

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71
73
74
77


CONTENTS

Dependency Graph Toolbar

78

Summary

80

CHAPTER 5: USING LAYER DIAGRAMS

81

Creating a Layer Diagram
Defining Layers on a Layer Diagram

82
83

Creating a Layer for a Single Artifact
Adding Multiple Objects to a Layer Diagram
The Layer Explorer

Defining Dependencies
Validating the Layer Diagram
Layer Diagrams and the Build Process
Summary

84
84
85

86
88
90
91

PART II: DEVELOPER
CHAPTER 6: INTRODUCTION TO SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

What’s New for Developers in Visual Studio 2010
Test Impact Analysis
Improved Code Analysis
Profiler Enhancements
Database Extensibility
Advanced Debugging with IntelliTrace
Improved “Test-First” Development Experience
Summary
CHAPTER 7: UNIT TESTING WITH THE UNIT TEST FRAMEWORK

Unit Testing Concepts

95

96
97
97
97
97
98
98
98
99

100

Benefits of Unit Testing
Writing Effective Unit Tests
Third-Party Tools

100
101
102

Visual Studio Unit Testing

102

Creating Your First Unit Test
Managing and Running Unit Tests
Test Run Configuration
Test Results
Debugging Unit Tests

Programming with the Unit Test Framework
Initialization and Cleanup of Unit Tests
Using the Assert Methods

103
106
108
109
109

110
110
113

xvii

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Using the CollectionAssert class
Using the StringAssert class
Expecting Exceptions
Defining Custom Unit Test Properties
TestContext Class
Creating Data-Driven Unit Tests

Accessing Nonpublic Members from Tests
Using PrivateObject to Access Nonpublic Instance Members
Using PrivateType to Access Nonpublic Static Members

Code Generation

116
118
119
119
120
121

122
123
125

126

Generating Tests from Code

Code Coverage

126

129

Enabling Code Coverage
Viewing Code Coverage Results

Test Impact Analysis

130
130

131

Prerequisites for Test Impact Analysis
Identifying Relationships Between Code and Tests
Test Impact Analysis Example

Summary

132
133
133

137

CHAPTER 8: MANAGED CODE ANALYSIS AND CODE METRICS

The Need for Analysis Tools
Using Managed Code Analysis

139

140
140

Built-in Managed Code Analysis Rules
Code Analysis Rule Sets
Enabling Managed Code Analysis
Executing Static Code Analysis
Working with Rule Violations

142
143
144
146
147

Using the Command-Line Analysis Tool

151

FxCopCmd Options
FxCopCmd Project Files
Build Process Code Analysis Integration

151
154
155

Creating Code Analysis Rules

155

Reflection and Introspection
Creating a New Rule

155
156

Code Metrics
Summary

163
165

CHAPTER 9: PROFILING AND PERFORMANCE

Introduction to Performance Analysis

xviii

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167

168


CONTENTS

Types of Profilers
Visual Studio Profiling

168
169

Using the Profiler

169

Creating a Sample Application
Creating a Performance Session
Using the Performance Explorer
Configuring a Sampling Session
Configuring an Instrumentation Session
Configuring a .NET Memory Allocation Session
Configuring a Concurrency Profiling Session
Executing a Performance Session
Managing Session Reports
Reading and Interpreting Session Reports

Command-Line Profiling Utilities
Virtual Machines
Profiling JavaScript
Just My Code

169
171
173
182
184
184
185
185
186
187

195
196
196
198

Common Profiling Issues

198

Debugging Symbols
Instrumentation and Code Coverage

Summary

198
199

199

CHAPTER 10: DATABASE DEVELOPMENT, TESTING,
AND DEPLOYMENT

201

The Challenges of Database Change Management
Offline Schema Development

202
203

Taking the Schema Offline
Iterative Development
Schema Testing
Build and Deploy

204
204
205
206

Creating a Database Project
Examining the Database Project
Solution Explorer versus Schema View
Schema Dependency Viewer
T-SQL File Structure

Making Schema Changes

207
212
213
213
214

215

Editing T-SQL Files Directly
Detecting Schema Syntax Errors
Database Refactoring
T-SQL Script Templates

Deploying Database Changes

216
216
217
220

221

xix

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CONTENTS

Data Generation

224

Data Generation Plan
Data Generators

224
226

Database Testing

227

Functions, Triggers, and Stored Procedures
Writing Advanced Database Unit Tests
Effective Database Testing
T-SQL Static Analysis
Additional Database Tools

Summary

227
230
231
233
236

241

CHAPTER 11: INTRODUCTION TO INTELLITRACE

Debugging Using IntelliTrace
Debugging Options
Events Recording
Debugging and Playback

243

243
244
247
248

New Features in Breakpoints
Sharing Breakpoints
Labeling Breakpoints

251
251
252

Pinnable Data Tips
Summary

253
255

PART III: TESTER
CHAPTER 12: INTRODUCTION TO SOFTWARE TESTING

Role-Based Testing Tools
Types of Tests
Diagnostic Data Adapters
Microsoft Test Manager
Managing Automated Tests with Visual Studio
Test Projects
Using Test Categories
Working with Test Results
Using Ordered Tests
Test Settings
Test Impact View

Summary

259

260
260
262
264
265
265
267
269
272
274
275

276

CHAPTER 13: WEB PERFORMANCE AND LOAD TESTING

Web Performance Tests

277

278

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CONTENTS

Web Performance Tests Versus Coded UI Tests
Creating a Sample Web Application
Creating Users for the Site
Creating and Configuring Web Tests
Recording a Web Performance Test
Configuring Web Performance Test Run Settings
Parameterizing the Web Server
Test Settings
Running a Web Performance Test
Observing Test Execution and Results
Editing a Web Performance Test
Data-Driven Web Performance Tests
Coded Web Performance Tests

Load Tests

278
279
279
281
282
284
285
285
287
287
289
293
294

297

Creating and Configuring Load Tests
Editing Load Tests
Executing Load Tests
Viewing and Interpreting Load Test Results

Command-Line Test Execution

297
306
308
308

312

Executing Tests
Executing Test Lists
Other Test Options

313
313
313

Distributed Load Tests

313

Installing Controllers and Agents
Configuring Controllers
Configuring Agents
Test Settings
Running a Distributed Load Test
Viewing a Distributed Load Test

Summary

314
314
315
315
316
317

317

CHAPTER 14: MANUAL TESTING

Microsoft Test Manager
Using Test Plans

319

319
320

Configuring Test Settings
Using Builds
Analyzing Impacted Tests
Defining Test Configurations
Using Plan Contents

322
323
324
325
326

Running Tests and Tracking Results
Using Microsoft Test Runner

330
332

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CONTENTS

Supported Technologies
Saving Test Results

335
335

Running Automated Tests
Summary

336
338

CHAPTER 15: CODED USER INTERFACE TESTING

Creating Coded UI Tests Using the Coded UI Test Builder
Setting up the Sample Application
Create a Test Project
Add a Coded UI Test
Coded UI Test Builder
Generated Code
Running Your Test
Creating a Data-Driven Test
Using the using() Clause
Enhanced Assertion Reporting

Creating Coded UI Tests Using Action Recordings
Supported Technologies
Summary

339

340
340
341
341
342
345
347
347
349
350

351
354
354

CHAPTER 16: LAB MANAGEMENT

357

Lab Management Infrastructure

358

Golden Images
Agents

359
359

Virtual Environments
Testing with Virtual Environments
Create New Test Settings
Run Manual Tests with an Environment

Automated Build-Deploy-Test with Virtual Environments
Physical Environments
Summary

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366
369

371
375
376

PART IV: TEAM FOUNDATION SERVER
CHAPTER 17: INTRODUCTION TO TEAM FOUNDATION SERVER

What Is Team Foundation Server?
Team Foundation Server Core Concepts
Team Foundation Application Tier
Team Project Collection

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CONTENTS

Team Project
Process Template
Work Item Tracking
Version Control
Team Build

382
385
387
388
391

Accessing Team Foundation Server
Accessing Team Foundation Server from Visual Studio
Using the Team Foundation Server Administration Console
Accessing Team Foundation Server through a Web Browser
Using Team Foundation Server in Microsoft Excel
Using Team Foundation Server in Microsoft Project
Command-Line Tools for Team Foundation Server
Accessing Team Foundation Server from Eclipse
Windows Explorer Integration with Team Foundation Server
Access to Team Foundation Server via other Third-Party Integrations

What’s New in Team Foundation Server 2010
Project Management
Version Control
Build
Administration

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397
397
398
399
400

400
400
401
401
402

Adopting Team Foundation Server

402

Hosting Team Foundation Server
Adoption Plan

402
403

Summary

404

CHAPTER 18: TEAM FOUNDATION ARCHITECTURE

Team Foundation Server Logical Architecture
Team Project Collections
Team Foundation Server Farm
Team Foundation Server Application
Team Foundation Server Instance

Physical Architecture

405

406
408
410
410
411

412

Hardware Requirements
Software Requirements

412
414

Deployment Scenarios

415

Individuals and Small Teams
Small Shops
Large Enterprises
Hosted Environments
Upgrading from Older Team Foundation Server Versions

Summary

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420

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