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bài kiểm tra tiếng anh

Dong A University
The Department of English
FINAL TEST 1A
(Time allotted: 75 minutes)
Subject
: Language 4
Number of credit : 1
Type of exam
: Closed book
Student’s full name: …………………………………………..Class: ……………..
Designed by: Le Thi Huynh Loc, MA.

Signature: ………………….

Approved by: Nguyen Ngoc Ha, MA.

Signature: ………………….

Mark

Examiner’s signature


Proctor’s signature

Examiner 1:…………………
Examiner 2:…………………

Proctor 1:………………………..
Proctor 2:……………………….

Answer Sheet
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Write your outline here
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PART 1- LISTENING
Section 1

Write NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS AND/OR A NUMBER for each answer.






Section 2

Tempere students’ game
Dates of the game: ……..1………
Cost of taking part: ……..2………
Entry fee including: ……..3………, meals and floor space
Hotel ……..4………has a special rate during the game
Hotel is close to ……..5………

Write NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS OR A NUMBER for each answer

Natural History day: morning events
All events begin at 9.30. You must attend one of these

Name of event
Dogs might fly
…… (8)…….
A world in your …… (12)
…….
I’m not touching that

Section 3

affected
Illegal

Theme or topic
…… (6)…….
How plants might …… (9)…….
Local animal and plant life

Type of event
…… (7)…….
…… (10)…….
…… (13)…….

Snakes and other …… (14)……. Workshop

Location
Room 27
…… (11)…….
Local park
…… (15)…….

Complete the FLOW CHART below using the words from the box
blunt
laughable

commonplace
luxurious

curved
ornamental

pointed
refined

simple
widely spaced
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16th century: forks introduced into France, their use regarded as …… (16)…….
17th century: forks introduced into England, initially regarded as …… (17)…….later used to
show that owners were …… (18)…….
Late 17th century, new forks with four curved tines, pointed knives banned
18th century, American used knives with …… (19)…….tips and spoons.

20th century: growing preference for …… (20)…….styles
P a r t 2 : R e a d i n g : R E A D I N G PA S S A G E 1

HOW BABIES THINK
The similarities between babies and scientist become particularly vivid when we consider how
babies learn about things. In science, and even in ordinary life, we look beyond the surfaces of the
world and try to infer its deeper patterns. We look for the underlying, hidden causes of events. We try
to figure out the nature of things.
It’s not just that we human beings can do this, we need to do it. We seem to have a kind of explanatory
drive, like our drive for food. When we’re presented with a puzzle, a mystery, a hint of a pattern,
something that doesn’t quite make sense, we work until we find a solution. In fact, we intentionally set
ourselves such problems, like crossword puzzles, video games or detective stories. As scientists, we
may stay up all night in the grip of a problem, even forgetting to eat, and it seems rather unlikely that
our salaries are the sole motivation.
We see this same drive to understand the world in its purest form in children. Human children in the
first three years of life are consumed by a desire to explore and experiment with objects. In fact, we
take this for granted as a sometimes exhausting fact of parenting. We childproof our houses and say,
with a sigh, that the baby is “always getting into things”.
From the time human babies can move around, they are torn between the safety of a grown-up
embrace and irresistible drive to explore. Toddlers in the park seem attached to their mothers or
fathers.
by invisible bungee cords: they venture out to explore and then in a sudden panic, race back to the safe
haven, only to venture forth again some few minutes later.
Seen form an evolutionary point of view, children’s exploratory behavior is rather peculiar. Not only
do babies expend enormous energy in exploring the world, their explorations often endanger their very
survival. The explanation seems to be that, for our species, the dangers of exploration are offset be the
benefits of learning. The rapid and profound changes in children’s understanding of the world seem
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related to the ways they explore and experiment. Children actively do things to promote their
understanding of disappearances, causes and categories.
Fortunately, these aspects of the physical world are so ubiquitous that babies can do their experiments
quite easily and for the most part safely. The cot, the house, the garden are excellent laboratories. For
instance, we can see babies become interested in, almost obsessed with, hiding- and finding games
when they are about a year old. Babies also spontaneously carry out solo investigations of the
mysterious Case of the Disappearing Object.
We once recorded a baby putting the same ring under a cloth and finding it 17 times in succession,
saying “all gone” each time. In our experiments, babies often begin by protesting when we take the toy
to hide it. But after one or two turns, they often start hiding the toy themselves or give to the cloth and
toy to us with instructions to hide it again. Eighteen-month-olds, who are not renowned for their long
attention span, will play this game for half an hour.
By the time babies are one or two years old, they will quite systematically explore the way one object
can influence another object, for instance experimenting with using a rake to pull a toy towards them.
The toy itself isn’t nearly as interesting as the fact that the rake moves it closer.
A key aspect of our developmental picture is that babies are actively engaged in looking for patterns in
what is going on around them, in testing hypotheses and in seeking explanations. They aren’t just
amorphous blobs that are stamped by evolution or shaped by their environment or moulded by adults.
Complete each sentence with the correct ending in the box
21. Crossword puzzles
22. Salaries
23. Parents
24. Young children
25. The benefits of learning
Example: 0. Children’s experiments A

may try to prevent exploration.

B

may compensate for the risks that exploration involves.

C

show that our development is determined by evolution and environment.

D

satisfy our need to look for explanations.

E

may be ways of understanding relationships between objects.

F

do not always demonstrate the value of exploration.

G

are probably not an adequate reason for exploring.

H

providing insight into successful ways to explore.

I

may alternate attempts to explore with a return to safety.
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The verbs in the box come from the reading passage. Complete the sentences below using
the verbs in the correct form. Use each verb once only.
carry out

endanger
shape

make
take test

offset

promote
underlie

seek

26. We generally ……………if for granted that children will grow up with an understanding of the
world around them, but we do not consider how this comes about.
27. A considerable amount of research has been ……………..into how babies learn that an object can
still exist after it has disappeared
28. Research usually involves first formulating a hypothesis and then …………….it.
29. Television programs about children do a great deal to ……………....understanding of their needs.
30. When something strange happens, we try to find an explanation that will ………………..sense of
it.
Passage 2: Choose the correct answer
SAVING TIME WHEN COMPUTING
Here is the second installment in our monthly “Computing for Business Users” guides.
A common complaint among computer users is the amount of time they spend waiting for their laptop
to start up and perform its tasks. Here are some handy tips on how to eliminate some of that waiting
time.
 Don’t shut your laptop all the way off between meetings; just put it in the low-battery consumption
“Standby” mode. Shutting it down and waiting for it to reboot at the next meeting wastes valuable
time. This way you are ready to start as soon as you arrive.
 Having too many programs in your computer’s Start Up folder really slows things down. The
solution? Eliminate all unnecessary programs.
 Stop too many programs from running at the same time when you start up the computer. Don’t
know how? It’s easy if you follow these instructions: click the Start menu, choose Run, then type
“madonfig” to launch the System Configuration Utility. Next, on the “General” tab, click “Selective
Startup”. Then go to the “Startup” tab and uncheck any startup items that aren’t necessary.
These are small but simple changes that you can make for yourself to save precious time. Next issues
we’ll be looking at extending your battery life.

31. Who is this article intended for?
A. Computer programmers
B. Business people
C. Program designers
D. Professional computer game players

32. What does the article explain?
A. How to start up your computer
B. How to improve the speed of a computer
C. How to change a battery
D. Where to buy the best computer
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33. How often are these computer articles
published?
A. Every day
B. Every week
C. Once a month
D. Twice a year

34. What is the topic of the next article?
A. Buying a new computer
B. Making your battery last longer
C. Computer accessories
D. Security

PART 3 - WRITING I. Find a word in the text with the same meaning as each word in the list below.

35. method
36. information
37. aim
38. effect
39. connection
40. advantage
Tetris is an electronic game invented by a Russian computer programmer in the 1980s. The object
of the game is to move various falling shapes into position to make horizontal lines. The technique for
achieving this is relatively simple, but there are many different levels of difficulty within the game. Some
parents and teachers believe that computer games like Tetris have a negative influence on young people
however, according to data published in a US scientific journal, playing Tetris may actually have an
unexpected benefit. Research suggests that there is a link between Tetris and improved brain efficiency,
says Dr Richard Haier of the Mind Research Network in Albuquerque, New Mexico.
II. Write the outline for the following topic.
Some people think that parents should teach their children how to be healthy and have a
balanced diet. Others, however, believe that school is the best place to learn this. Discuss both these
views and give your own opinion.
----------------The end-----------------

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