Tải bản đầy đủ

ACCA p3 complete text 2016

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

ACCA

 

 
 

Paper P3

 


 
 

Business Analysis

 

 
 

Complete Text

 


British library cataloguing­in­publication data 
A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library. 
Published by:  
Kaplan Publishing UK 
Unit 2 The Business Centre  
Molly Millars Lane  
Wokingham  
Berkshire  
RG41 2QZ   
ISBN  978­1­78415­220­8 
© Kaplan Financial Limited, 2015 
The text in this material and any others made available by any Kaplan Group company does not 
amount to advice on a particular matter and should not be taken as such. No reliance should be 
placed on the content as the basis for any investment or other decision or in connection with any 
advice given to third parties. Please consult your appropriate professional adviser as necessary. 
Kaplan Publishing Limited and all other Kaplan group companies expressly disclaim all liability to any 
person in respect of any losses or other claims, whether direct, indirect, incidental, consequential or 
otherwise arising in relation to the use of such materials. 
Printed and bound in Great Britain 
Acknowledgements 
We are grateful to the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants and the Chartered Institute of 
Management Accountants for permission to reproduce past examination questions.  The answers 
have been prepared by Kaplan Publishing. 
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or 
transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or 


otherwise, without the prior written permission of Kaplan Publishing. 

ii

KAPLAN PUBLISHING


Contents
Page
Chapter 1

The nature of strategic business analysis

1

Chapter 2

The environment and competitive forces

29

Chapter 3

Internal resources, capabilities and 
competences

67

Chapter 4

Stakeholders, governance and ethics

101

Chapter 5

Strategies for competitive advantage

123

Chapter 6

Other elements of strategic choice

171

Chapter 7

Methods of strategic development

195

Chapter 8

Organisational structure

227

Chapter 9

Business process change

265

Chapter 10

The role of information technology

297

Chapter 11

Marketing

357

Chapter 12

Project management I – The business case

399

Chapter 13

Project management II – Managing the project to  441
its conclusion

Chapter 14

Financial analysis

469

Chapter 15

Strategy and people

551

Chapter 16

Strategic development and managing strategic  587
change

Chapter 17

Questions & Answers

KAPLAN PUBLISHING

617

iii


iv

KAPLAN PUBLISHING


chapter
Introduction
 

Paper Introduction 
 

v


Introduction

 

How to Use the Materials

These Kaplan Publishing learning materials have been carefully designed to 
make your learning experience as easy as possible and to give you the best 
chances of success in your examinations. 
The product range contains a number of features to help you in the study 
process. They include: 
(1) Detailed study guide and syllabus objectives
(2) Description of the examination
(3) Study skills and revision guidance
(4) Complete text or essential text
(5) Question practice
The sections on the study guide, the syllabus objectives, the examination 
and study skills should all be read before you commence your studies. They 
are designed to familiarise you with the nature and content of the 
examination and give you tips on how to best to approach your learning. 
The complete text or essential text comprises the main learning 
materials and gives guidance as to the importance of topics and where 
other related resources can be found. Each chapter includes: 

vi



The learning objectives contained in each chapter, which have been 
carefully mapped to the examining body's own syllabus learning 
objectives or outcomes. You should use these to check you have a clear 
understanding of all the topics on which you might be assessed in the 
examination.



The chapter diagram provides a visual reference for the content in the 
chapter, giving an overview of the topics and how they link together.



The content for each topic area commences with a brief explanation or 
definition to put the topic into context before covering the topic in detail. 
You should follow your studying of the content with a review of the 
illustration/s. These are worked examples which will help you to 
understand better how to apply the content for the topic.



Test your understanding sections provide an opportunity to assess 
your understanding of the key topics by applying what you have learned 
to short questions. Answers can be found at the back of each chapter.

KAPLAN PUBLISHING




Summary diagrams complete each chapter to show the important 
links between topics and the overall content of the paper. These 
diagrams should be used to check that you have covered and 
understood the core topics before moving on.



Question practice is provided at the back of each text.

Quality and accuracy are of the utmost importance to us so if you spot an 
error in any of our products, please send an email to 
mykaplanreporting@kaplan.com with full details, or follow the link to the 
feedback form in MyKaplan. 
Our Quality Coordinator will work with our technical team to verify the error 
and take action to ensure it is corrected in future editions. 
Icon Explanations
Definition – Key definitions that you will need to learn from the core content.
Key Point – identifies topics which are key to success and are often 
examined. 
New – identifies topics that are brand new in papers that build on, and 
therefore also contain, learning covered in earlier papers. 
Expandable Text – Expandable text provides you with additional 
information about a topic area and may help you gain a better 
understanding of the core content. Essential text users can access this 
additional content online (read it where you need further guidance or skip 
over when you are happy with the topic).
Test Your Understanding – Exercises for you to complete to ensure 
that you have understood the topics just learned.
Illustration – Worked examples help you understand the core content 
better.  
Tricky topic – When reviewing these areas care should be taken and all 
illustrations and test your understanding exercises should be completed 
to ensure that the topic is understood.
Tutorial note – Included to explain some of the technical points in more 
detail.  
Footsteps – helpful tutor tips. 

KAPLAN PUBLISHING

vii


Introduction
On­line subscribers
Our on­line resources are designed to increase the flexibility of your learning 
materials and provide you with immediate feedback on how your studies 
are progressing. 
If you are subscribed to our on­line resources you will find: 
(1) On­line referenceware: reproduces your Complete or Essential Text on­
line, giving you anytime, anywhere access.
(2) On­line testing: provides you with additional on­line objective testing so 
you can practice what you have learned further.
(3) On­line performance management: immediate access to your on­line 
testing results. Review your performance by key topics and chart your 
achievement through the course relative to your peer group.
Ask your local customer services staff if you are not already a subscriber 
and wish to join. 

Syllabus
Paper background
The aim of ACCA Paper P3, Business analysis, is to apply relevant 
knowledge and skills and to exercise professional judgement in assessing 
strategic position, determining strategic choice and implementing strategic 
action through beneficial business process and structural change; 
coordinating knowledge systems and information technology and by 
effectively managing quality processes, projects and people within financial 
and other resource constraints.  
 
Objectives of the Syllabus 

viii





Assess the strategic position of an organisation.



Evaluate and redesign business processes and structures to implement 
and support the organisation's strategy taking account of customer and 
other major stakeholder requirements.



Integrate appropriate information technology solutions to support the 
organisation's strategy.



Apply appropriate quality initiatives to implement and support the 
organisation's strategy.

Evaluate the strategic choices available to an organisation.
Discuss how an organisation might go about its strategic 
implementation.

KAPLAN PUBLISHING




Advise on the principles of project management to enable the 
implementation of aspects of the organisation's strategy with the twin 
objectives of managing risk and ensuring benefits realisation.



Analyse and evaluate the effectiveness of a company's strategy and the 
financial consequences of implementing strategic decisions.



The role of leadership and people management in formulating and 
implementing business strategy.

Core areas of the syllabus 
The syllabus for Paper P3, Business Analysis, is primarily concerned with 
two issues. The first is the external forces (the behaviour of customers, the 
initiatives of competitors, the emergence of new laws and regulations) that 
shape the environment of an organisation. The second is the internal 
ambitions and concerns (desire for growth, the design of processes, the 
competences of employees, the financial resources) that exist within an 
organisation. This syllabus looks at both of these perspectives, from 
assessing strategic position and choice to identifying and formulating 
strategy and strategic action. It identifies opportunities for beneficial change 
that involve people, finance and information technology. It examines how 
these opportunities may be implemented through the appropriate 
management of programmes and projects. 
The syllabus begins with the assessment of strategic position in the present 
and in the future using relevant forecasting techniques, and is primarily 
concerned with the impact of the external environment on the business, its 
internal capabilities and expectations and how the organisation positions 
itself under these constraints. It examines how factors such as culture, 
leadership and stakeholder expectations shape organisational purpose. 
Strategic choice is concerned with decisions which have to be made about 
an organisation’s future and the way in which it can respond to the 
influences and pressures identified in the assessment of its current and 
future strategic position. 
Strategic action concerns the implementation of strategic choices and the 
transformation of these choices into organisational action. Such action 
takes place in day­to­day processes and organisational relationships and 
these processes and relationships need to be managed in line with the 
intended strategy, involving the effective coordination of information 
technology, people, finance and other business resources. 

KAPLAN PUBLISHING

ix


Introduction
Companies that undertake successful business process redesign claim 
significant organisational improvements. This simply reflects the fact that 
many existing processes are less efficient than they could be and that new 
technology makes it possible to design more efficient processes. Strategic 
planning and strategy implementation has to be subject to financial 
benchmarks. Financial analysis explicitly recognises this, reminding 
candidates of the importance of focusing on the key management 
accounting techniques that help to determine strategic action and the 
financial ratios and measures that may be used to assess the viability of a 
strategy and to monitor and measure its success. Throughout, the syllabus 
recognises that successful strategic planning and implementation requires 
the effective recruitment, leadership, organisation and training, and 
development of people. 
Syllabus objectives 
We have reproduced the ACCA's syllabus below, showing where the 
objectives are explored within this book. Within the chapters, we have 
broken down the extensive information found in the syllabus into easily 
digestible and relevant sections, called Content Objectives. These 
correspond to the objectives at the beginning of each chapter. 
Syllabus learning objectives and chapter references:
A  THE STRATEGIC POSITION OF AN ORGANISATION
1  The need for, and purpose of, strategic and business analysis 
(a) Recognise the fundamental nature and vocabulary of strategy and 
strategic decisions.[2] Ch. 1
(b) Discuss how strategy may be formulated at different levels (corporate 
business level, operational) of an organisation.[2] Ch. 1
(c) Explore the Johnson & Scholes and Whittington model for defining 
elements of strategic management – the strategic position, strategic 
choices and strategy into action.[3] Ch. 1
(d) Analyse how strategic management is affected by different 
organisational contexts.[3] Ch. 1
(e) Compare three different strategy lenses (Johnson & Scholes) for 
viewing and understanding strategy and strategic management.[3] Ch.
1
(f)

x

Explore the scope of business analysis and its relationship to strategy 
and strategic management in the context of the relational diagram of 
this course.[3] Ch. 1

KAPLAN PUBLISHING


2  Environmental issues affecting the strategic position of, and future
outlook for, an organisation 
(a) Assess the macro­environment of an organisation using PESTEL.
[3] Ch. 2
(b) Highlight the external key drivers of change likely to affect the structure 
of a sector or market.[3] Ch. 2
(c) Explore, using Porter's Diamond, the influence of national 
competitiveness on the strategic position of an organisation.[2] Ch. 2
(d) Prepare scenarios reflecting different assumptions about the future 
environment of an organisation.[3] Ch. 2
(e) Evaluate methods of business forecasting used when quantitatively 
assessing the likely outcome of different business strategies.[3] Ch. 2
3  Competitive forces affecting an organisation 
(a) Discuss the significance of industry, sector and convergence.[3] Ch. 2
(b) Evaluate the sources of competition in an industry or sector using 
Porter's five forces framework.[3] Ch. 2
(c) Assess the contribution of the lifecycle model, the cycle of competition 
and associated costing implications to understanding competitive 
behaviour.[3] Ch. 3
(d) Analyse the influence of strategic groups and market segmentation.
[3] Ch. 2
(e) Determine the opportunities and threats posed by the environment of an 
organisation.[2] Ch. 2
4  Marketing and the value of goods and services 
(a) Analyse customers and markets.[2] Ch. 11
(b) Establish appropriate critical success factors (CSFs) and key 
performance indicators (KPIs) for products and services.[2] Ch. 3
(c) Explore the role of the value chain in creating and sustaining 
competitive advantage.[2] Ch. 5
(d) Advise on the role and influence of value networks.[3] Ch. 5
(e) Assess different approaches to benchmarking an organisation's 
performance.[3] Ch. 5

KAPLAN PUBLISHING

xi


Introduction
5  The internal resources, capabilities and competences of an
organisation 
(a) Discriminate between strategic capability, threshold resources, 
threshold competences, unique resources and core competences.
[3] Ch. 3
(b) Discuss from a strategic perspective, the continuing need for effective 
cost management and control systems within organisations.[3] Ch. 5
(c) Discuss the capabilities required to sustain competitive advantage.
[2] Ch. 5
(d) Explain the impact of new product, process, and service developments 
and innovation in supporting business strategy.[2] Ch. 5
(e) Discuss the contribution of organisational knowledge to the strategic 
capability of an organisation.[2] Ch. 5
(f) Determine the strengths and weaknesses of an organisation and 
formulate an appropriate SWOT analysis.[2] Ch. 3
6  The expectations of stakeholders and the influence of ethics and
culture 
(a) Advise on the implications of corporate governance on organisational 
purpose and strategy.[2] Ch. 4
(b) Evaluate, through stakeholder mapping, the relative influence of 
stakeholders on organisational purpose and strategy.[3] Ch. 4
(c) Assess ethical influences on organisational purpose and strategy.
[3] Ch. 4
(d) Explore the scope of corporate social responsibility.[3] Ch. 4
(e) Assess the impact of culture on organisational purpose and strategy.
[3] Ch. 16
(f) Prepare and evaluate a cultural web of an organisation.[2] Ch. 16
(g) Advise on how organisations can communicate their core values and 
mission.[3] Ch. 4
(h) Explain the role of integrated reporting in communicating strategy  and 
strategic performance.[2] Ch. 4

xii

KAPLAN PUBLISHING


B  THE STRATEGIC CHOICES AVAILABLE TO AN ORGANISATION 
1  The influence of corporate strategy on an organisation 
(a) Explore the relationship between a corporate parent and its business 
units.[2] Ch. 7
(b) Assess the opportunities and potential problems of pursuing different 
corporate strategies of product/market diversification from a national, 
international and global perspective.[3] Ch. 8
(c) Assess the opportunities and potential problems of pursuing a 
corporate strategy of international diversity, international scale 
operations and globalisation.[3] Ch. 8
(d) Discuss a range of ways that the corporate parent can create and 
destroy organisational value.[2] Ch. 7
(e) Explain three corporate rationales for adding value – portfolio 
managers, synergy managers and parental developers.[3] Ch. 7
(f) Explain and apply a range of the following portfolio models (the BCG 
growth/share matrix, public sector matrix, the parenting matrix or 
Ashridge Portfolio display) to assist corporate parents in managing 
their business portfolios.[3] Ch. 7
2  Alternative approaches to achieving competitive advantage 
(a) Evaluate, through the strategy clock, generic strategy options available 
to an organisation.[3] Ch. 5
(b) Advise on how price­based strategies, differentiation and lock­in can 
help an organisation sustain its competitive advantage.[3] Ch. 5
(c) Assess opportunities for improving competitiveness through 
collaboration.[3] Ch. 5
3  Alternative directions and methods of development 
(a) Determine generic development directions (employing an adapted 
Ansoff matrix and a TOWS matrix) available to an organisation.[2] Ch. 6
(b) Assess how internal development, mergers, acquisitions and strategic 
alliances can be used as different methods of pursuing a chosen 
strategic direction.[3] Ch. 7
(c) Establish success criteria to assist in the choice of a strategic direction 
and method (strategic options).[2] Ch. 7
(d) Assess the suitability of different strategic options to an organisation.
[3] Ch. 6
(e) Assess the feasibility of different strategic options to an organisation.
[3] Ch. 6
KAPLAN PUBLISHING

xiii


Introduction
(f)

Establish the acceptability of strategic options to an organisation 
through analysing risk and return on investment.[3] Ch. 6

C  STRATEGIC ACTION 
1  Organising and enabling success 
(a) Advise on how the organisation can be structured to deliver a selected 
strategy.[3] Ch. 8
(b) Explore generic processes that take place within the structure, with 
particular emphasis on the planning process.[3] Ch. 8
(c) Discuss how internal relationships can be organised to deliver a 
selected strategy.[2] Ch. 7
(d) Discuss how organisational structure and external relationships 
(boundary­less organisations; hollow, modular and virtual) and strategic 
alliances (joint ventures, networks, franchising, licensing) and the 
supporting concepts of outsourcing, offshoring and shared services, 
can be used to deliver a selected strategy.[2] Ch. 8
(e) Discuss how big data can be used to inform and implement business 
strategy.[2] Ch. 8
(f) Explore (through Mintzberg’s organisational configurations) the design 
of structure, processes and relationships.[3] Ch. 8
2  Managing strategic change 
(a) Explore different types of strategic change and their implications.[2] Ch.
16
(b) Determine and diagnose the organisational context of change using 
Balogun and Hope Hailey's contextual features model and the cultural 
web.[3] Ch. 16
(c) Establish potential blockages and levers of change.[2] Ch. 16
(d) Advise on the style of leadership appropriate to manage strategic 
change.[2] Ch. 16
3  Understanding strategy development 
(a) Discriminate between the concepts of intended and emergent 
strategies.[3] Ch. 16
(b) Explain how organisations attempt to put an intended strategy into 
place.[2] Ch. 16
(c) Highlight how emergent strategies appear from within an organisation.
[3] Ch. 16
(d) Discuss how process redesign, quality initiatives and e­business can 
contribute to emergent strategies.[2] Ch. 16
xiv

KAPLAN PUBLISHING


(e) Assess the implications of strategic drift and the demand for multiple 
processes of strategy development.[3] Ch. 16
D  BUSINESS AND PROCESS CHANGE 
1  Business change
(a) Explain that business change projects are initiated to address strategic 
alignment.[2] Ch. 16
(b) Apply the stages of the business change lifecycle (alignment, definition, 
design, implementation and realisation).[3] Ch.16
(c) Assess the value of the four view (POPIT – people, organisation, 
processes and information technology) model to the successful 
implementation of business change.[3] Ch. 15
2  The role of process and process change initiatives 
(a) Advise on how an organisation can reconsider the design of its 
processes to deliver a selected strategy.[3] Ch. 9
(b) Appraise business process change initiatives previously adopted by 
organisations.[3] Ch. 9
(c) Establish an appropriate scope and focus for business process change 
using Harmon's process­strategy matrix.[3] Ch. 9
(d) Explore the commoditisation of business processes.[3] Ch. 9
(e) Advise on the implications of business process outsourcing.[3] Ch. 9
(f) Recommend a business process redesign methodology for an 
organisation.[2] Ch. 9
3  Improving the processes of the organisation 
(a) Evaluate the effectiveness of a current organisational process.[3] Ch. 9
(b) Describe a range of process redesign patterns.[2] Ch. 9
(c) Establish possible redesign options for improving the current 
processes of an organisation.[2] Ch. 9
(d) Assess the feasibility of possible redesign options.[3] Ch. 9
(e) Assess the relationship between process redesign and strategy.[3] Ch.
9

KAPLAN PUBLISHING

xv


Introduction
4  Software solutions 
(a) Establish information system requirements required by business users.
[2] Ch. 9
(b) Assess the advantages and disadvantages of using a generic software 
solution to fulfil those requirements.[2] Ch. 9
(c) Establish a process for evaluating, selecting and implementing a 
generic software solution.[2] Ch. 9
(d) Explore the relationship between generic software solutions and 
business process redesign.[2] Ch. 9
E  INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS 
1  Principles of information technology 
(a) Advise on the basic hardware and software infrastructure required to 
support business information systems.[2] Ch. 10
(b) Identify and analyse general information technology controls and 
application controls required for effective accounting information  
systems.[2] Ch. 10
(c) Analyse the adequacy of general information technology controls and 
application controls for relevant application systems.[3] Ch. 10
(d) Evaluate controls over the safeguarding of information technology 
assets to ensure the organizational ability to meet business objectives.
[3] Ch. 10
2  Principles of e­business 
(a) Discuss the meaning and scope of e­business.[2] Ch. 10
(b) Advise on the reasons for the adoption of e­business and recognise 
barriers to its adoption.[3] Ch. 10
(c) Evaluate how e­business changes the relationships between 
organisations and their customers.[3] Ch. 10
(d) Discuss and evaluate the main business and marketplace models for 
delivering e­business.[3] Ch. 10
3  E­business application: upstream supply chain management 
(a) Analyse the main elements of both the push and pull models of the 
supply chain.[2] Ch. 10
(b) Discuss the relationship of the supply chain to the value chain and the 
value network.[2] Ch. 10

xvi

KAPLAN PUBLISHING


(c) Assess the potential application of information technology to support 
and restructure the supply chain.[3] Ch. 10
(d) Advise on how external relationships with suppliers and distributors can 
be structured to deliver a restructured supply chain.[3] Ch. 10
(e) Discuss the methods, benefits and risks of e­procurement.[2] Ch. 10
(f)

Assess different options and models for implementing e­procurement.
[2] Ch. 10

4  E­business application: downstream supply chain management 
(a) Define the scope and media of e­marketing.[2] Ch. 11
(b) Highlight how the media of e­marketing can be used when developing 
an effective e­marketing plan.[2] Ch. 11
(c) Explore the characteristics of the media of e­marketing using the '6I's of 
Interactivity, Intelligence, Individualisation, integration, Industry structure 
and Independence of location.[2] Ch. 11
(d) Evaluate the effect of the media of e­marketing on the traditional 
marketing mix of product, promotion, price, place, people, processes 
and physical evidence.[3] Ch. 11
(e) Describe a process for establishing a pricing strategy for products and 
services that recognises both economic and non­economic factors.
[2] Ch. 11
(f) Assess the importance of, on­line branding in e­marketing and 
compare it with traditional branding. Ch. 11
5  E­business application: customer relationship management 
(a) Define the meaning and scope of customer relationship management.
[2] Ch. 11
(b) Explore different methods of acquiring customers through exploiting 
electronic media.[2] Ch. 11
(c) Evaluate different buyer behaviour amongst on­line customers.[3] Ch.
11
(d) Recommend techniques for retaining customers using electronic 
media.[2] Ch. 11
(e) Recommend how electronic media may be used to increase the activity 
and value of established, retained customers.[2] Ch. 11
(f)

Discuss the scope of a representative software package solution 
designed to support customer relationship management.[2] Ch. 11

KAPLAN PUBLISHING

xvii


Introduction
F  PROJECT MANAGEMENT 
1  Identifying and initiating projects 
(a) Determine the distinguishing features of projects and the constraints 
they operate in.[2] Ch. 12
(b) Discuss the implications of the triple constraint of scope, time, and cost.
[2] Ch. 12
(c) Discuss the relationship between organisational strategy and project 
management.[2] Ch. 12
(d) Identify and plan to manage risks.[2] Ch. 12
(e) Advise on the structures and information that have to be in place to 
successfully initiate a project.[3] Ch. 12
(f) Explain the relevance of projects to process re­design and e­business 
systems development.[2] Ch. 12
2  Building the business case 
(a) Describe the structure and content of a business case document.[2] Ch.
12
(b) Analyse, describe, assess and classify the benefits of a project 
investment.[2] Ch. 12
(c) Analyse, describe, assess and classify the costs of a project 
investment.[2] Ch. 12
(d) Evaluate the costs and benefits of a business case using standard 
techniques.[2] Ch. 12
(e) Establish responsibility for the delivery of benefits.[2] Ch. 12
(f)

Explain the role of a benefits realisation plan.[2] Ch. 12

3  Managing and leading projects 
(a) Discuss the organisation and implications of project­based team 
structures.[2] Ch. 13
(b) Establish the role and responsibilities of the project manager and the 
project sponsor.[2] Ch. 13
(c) Identify and describe typical problems encountered by a project 
manager when leading a project.[2] Ch. 13
(d) Advise on how these typical problems might be addressed and 
overcome.[3] Ch. 13

xviii

KAPLAN PUBLISHING


4  Planning, monitoring and controlling projects 
(a) Discuss the principles of a product break down structure.[2] Ch. 13
(b) Assess the importance of developing a project plan and discuss the 
work required to produce this plan.[3] Ch. 13
(c) Monitor the status of a project and identify project risks, issues, 
slippage and changes.[2] Ch. 13
(d) Formulate responses for dealing with project risks, issues, slippage 
and changes.[2] Ch. 13
(e) Discuss the role of benefits management and project gateways in 
project monitoring.[2] Ch. 13
5  Concluding a project 
(a) Establish mechanisms for successfully concluding a project.[2] Ch. 13
(b) Discuss the relative meaning and benefits of a post­implementation 
and a post­project review.[2] Ch. 13
(c) Discuss the meaning and value of benefits realisation.[2] Ch. 13
(d) Evaluate how project management software may support the planning 
and monitoring of a project.[3] Ch. 13
(e) Apply 'lessons learned' to future business case validation and to capital 
allocation decisions.[3] Ch. 13
G  THE ROLE OF FINANCE IN FORMULATING AND IMPLEMENTING
BUSINESS STRATEGY 
1  The link between strategy and finance 
(a) Explain the relationship between strategy and finance.[3]  Ch. 14 
(i) managing for value
(ii) financial expectations of stakeholders
(iii) funding strategies.
(b) Discuss how the finance function has transformed to enabling an 
accountant to have a key role in the decision making process from 
strategy formulation and implementation to its impact on business 
performance.[2] Ch. 14
2  Finance decisions to formulate and support business strategy 
(a) Determine the overall investment requirements of the business.[2] Ch.
14

KAPLAN PUBLISHING

xix


Introduction
(b) Evaluate alternative sources of finance for these investments and their 
associated risks.[3] Ch. 14
(c) Efficiently and effectively manage the current and non­current assets of 
the business from a finance and risk perspective.[2] Ch. 14
3  The role of cost and management accounting in strategic planning
and decision making 
(a) Evaluate budgeting, standard costing and variance analysis in support 
of strategic planning and decision making.[3] Ch. 14
(b) Evaluate strategic and operational decisions taking into account risk 
and uncertainty using decision trees.[2] Ch. 14
(c) Evaluate the following strategic options using marginal and relevant 
costing techniques.[3] Ch. 14 
(i) Make or buy decisions
(ii) Accepting or declining special contracts
(iii) Closure or continuation decisions
(iv) Effective use of scarce resources
(d) Evaluate the role and limitations of cost accounting in strategy 
development and implementation, specifically relating to.[2] 
(i) Direct and indirect costs in multi­product contexts
(ii) Overhead apportionment in full costing
(iii) Activity based costing in planning and control
4  Financial implications of making strategic choices and of
implementing strategic actions 
(a) Apply efficiency ratios to assess how efficiently an organisation uses its 
current resources.[2] Ch. 3
(b) Apply appropriate gearing ratios to assess the risks associated with 
financing and investment in the organisation.[2] Ch. 3
(c) Apply appropriate liquidity ratios to assess the organisation’s short­
term commitments to creditors and employees.[2] Ch. 3
(d) Apply appropriate profitability ratios to assess the viability of chosen 
strategies.[2] Ch. 3
(e) Apply appropriate investment ratios to assist investors and 
shareholders in evaluating organisational performance and strategy.
[2] Ch. 3 and Ch. 12

xx

KAPLAN PUBLISHING


H  PEOPLE 
(Note that Section H of the syllabus is underpinned directly by knowledge 
gained in F1, Accountant in Business. Students are expected to be 
familiar with the following Study Guide subject areas from that syllabus: 
A1, A2, B1­B3, D1, and D4­D6) 
1  Strategy and people: leadership 
(a) Explain the role of visionary leadership and identify the key leadership 
traits effective in the successful formulation and implementation of 
strategy and change management.[3] Ch. 15
(b) Apply and compare alternative classical and modern theories of 
leadership in the effective implementation of strategic objectives.[3] Ch.
15
2  Strategy and people: job design 
(a) Assess the contribution of four different approaches to job design 
(scientific management, job enrichment, Japanese management and 
re­engineering).[3] Ch. 15
(b) Explain the human resource implications of knowledge work and post­ 
industrial job design.[2] Ch. 15
(c) Discuss the tensions and potential ethical issues related to job design.
[2] Ch. 15
(d) Advise on the relationship of job design to quality initiatives, process re­
design, project management and the harnessing of e­business 
opportunities.[3] Ch. 15
3  Strategy and people: staff development 
(a) Discuss the emergence and scope of human resource development, 
succession planning and their relationship to the strategy of the 
organisation.[2] Ch. 15
(b) Advise and suggest different methods of establishing human resource 
development.[3] Ch. 15
(c) Advise on the contribution of competency frameworks to human 
resource development.[3] Ch. 15
(d) Discuss the meaning and contribution of workplace learning, the 
learning organisation, organisation learning and knowledge 
management.[3] Ch. 15

KAPLAN PUBLISHING

xxi


Introduction
The superscript numbers in square brackets indicate the intellectual depth 
at which the subject area could be assessed within the examination. Level 1 
(knowledge and comprehension) broadly equates with the Knowledge 
module, Level 2 (application and analysis) with the Skills module and Level 
3 (synthesis and evaluation) to the Professional level. However, lower level 
skills can continue to be assessed as you progress through each module 
and level. 

The Examination
Business analysis will be assessed by way of a three­hour closed book 
examination. 
The examination paper will be structured in two sections. Section A will be 
based on a case study style question comprising a compulsory 50 mark 
question, with requirements based on several parts, with all parts relating to 
the same case information. The case will usually assess across a range of 
subject areas within the syllabus and will require the candidate to 
demonstrate high level capabilities in order to evaluate information available 
and to prepare reports and other forms of analysis such as structure and 
process diagrams where required. 
Section B comprises three questions of 25 marks each, of which the 
candidate must answer two. These questions will be more likely to assess a 
discrete subject area from each of the main syllabus section headings. 
The questions will cover all areas of the syllabus: 
Number of marks 
Section A 
One 50 mark question, possibly in several parts 
Section B 
Two out of three 25­mark questions 

50 
50 
100 

Total time allowed: 3 hours with 15 minutes reading 
time 
 
 
Using the reading time 
The reading time should be used as follows: 
(a) Read through, and do an outline plan of, each of the section B 
questions. This will allow you to choose which you will attempt.
(b) Analyse the requirements of the section A question in detail – do you 
understand them? What tools or models do you think will be useful and 
why? What calculations could help? Can you see how the requirements 
fit together?

xxii

KAPLAN PUBLISHING


(c) Read through the section A scenario in detail, highlighting key issues 
on the question paper. This could involve the use of frameworks – e.g. if 
you plan to include a SWOT analysis with your answer, then you could 
underline issues in the question and write the appropriate S,W,O or T in 
the margin.
Approach to the remainder of the exam 
Divide the time you spend on questions in proportion to the marks on offer. 
One suggestion for this examination is to allocate 1 and 4/5 minutes to 
each mark available, so a 25 mark question should be completed in 
approximately 45 minutes. 
Stick to the question and tailor your answer to what you are asked. Pay 
particular attention to the verbs in the question. 
Spend the last five minutes reading through your answers and making any 
additions or corrections. 
If you get completely stuck with a question, leave space in your answer 
book and return to it later. 
If you do not understand what a question is asking, state your assumptions. 
Even if you do not answer in precisely the way the examiner hoped, you 
should be given some credit, if your assumptions are reasonable. 
You should do everything you can to make things easy for the marker. The 
marker will find it easier to identify the points you have made if your answers 
are legible. 
Scenario­based questions: to analyse a scenario, first identify the area in 
which there is a problem, outline the main principles/theories you are going 
to use to answer the question, and then apply the principles/theories to the 
case. 
Essay­style questions: Some section B questions may contain essay­
style requirements. Your answer should have a clear structure. It should 
contain a brief introduction, a main section and a conclusion. Be concise. It 
is better to write a little about a lot of different points than a great deal about 
one or two points. 
Computations: It is essential to include all your workings in your answers. 
Many computational questions require the use of a standard format. Be sure 
you know these formats thoroughly before the exam and use the layouts that 
you see in the answers given in this book and in model answers. 
Reports, memos and other documents: some questions ask you to 
present your answer in the form of a report or a memo or other document. 
So use the correct format – there could be easy marks to gain here. 

KAPLAN PUBLISHING

xxiii


Introduction

Study skills and revision guidance
This section aims to give guidance on how to study for your ACCA exams 
and to give ideas on how to improve your existing study techniques. 
Preparing to study
Set your objectives 
Before starting to study decide what you want to achieve – the type of pass 
you wish to obtain. This will decide the level of commitment and time you 
need to dedicate to your studies. 
Devise a study plan 
Determine which times of the week you will study. 
Split these times into sessions of at least one hour for study of new material. 
Any shorter periods could be used for revision or practice. 
Put the times you plan to study onto a study plan for the weeks from now until 
the exam and set yourself targets for each period of study – in your sessions 
make sure you cover the course, course assignments and revision. 
If you are studying for more than one paper at a time, try to vary your 
subjects as this can help you to keep interested and see subjects as part of 
wider knowledge. 
When working through your course, compare your progress with your plan 
and, if necessary, re­plan your work (perhaps including extra sessions) or, if 
you are ahead, do some extra revision/practice questions. 
Effective studying
Active reading 
You are not expected to learn the text by rote, rather, you must understand 
what you are reading and be able to use it to pass the exam and develop 
good practice. A good technique to use is SQ3Rs – Survey, Question, 
Read, Recall, Review: 
(1) Survey the chapter – look at the headings and read the introduction, 
summary and objectives, so as to get an overview of what the chapter 
deals with.
(2) Question – whilst undertaking the survey, ask yourself the questions 
that you hope the chapter will answer for you.
(3) Read through the chapter thoroughly, answering the questions and 
making sure you can meet the objectives. Attempt the exercises and 
activities in the text, and work through all the examples.
xxiv

KAPLAN PUBLISHING


(4) Recall – at the end of each section and at the end of the chapter, try to 
recall the main ideas of the section/chapter without referring to the text. 
This is best done after a short break of a couple of minutes after the 
reading stage.
(5) Review – check that your recall notes are correct.
You may also find it helpful to re­read the chapter to try to see the topic(s) it 
deals with as a whole. 
Note­taking 
Taking notes is a useful way of learning, but do not simply copy out the text. 
The notes must: 







be in your own words
be concise
cover the key points
be well­organised
be modified as you study further chapters in this text or in related ones.

Trying to summarise a chapter without referring to the text can be a useful 
way of determining which areas you know and which you don't. 
Three ways of taking notes: 
Summarise the key points of a chapter. 
Make linear notes – a list of headings, divided up with subheadings listing 
the key points. If you use linear notes, you can use different colours to 
highlight key points and keep topic areas together. Use plenty of space to 
make your notes easy to use. 
Try a diagrammatic form – the most common of which is a mind­map. To 
make a mind­map, put the main heading in the centre of the paper and put a 
circle around it. Then draw short lines radiating from this to the main sub­
headings, which again have circles around them. Then continue the process 
from the sub­headings to sub­sub­headings, advantages, disadvantages, 
etc. 
Highlighting and underlining 
You may find it useful to underline or highlight key points in your study text – 
but do be selective. You may also wish to make notes in the margins. 

KAPLAN PUBLISHING

xxv


Tài liệu bạn tìm kiếm đã sẵn sàng tải về

Tải bản đầy đủ ngay

×