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New sky 3 teacher book

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New Sky takes the clear syllabus and methodology
of the original course and adds new and exciting
content to make it even more effective and
motivating for both teachers and learners.

New Sky 3


Fly high with

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Visually appealing and easy to use, New Sky
provides short achievable lessons, clearly
contextualised grammar practice and integrated
skills work.
With its songs, raps, games, puzzles and stories,
New Sky makes learning English stimulating,
lively and fun!

Teacher’s Book

COURSE COMPONENTS

• Students’ Book
• Activity Book with Students’ Multi-ROM
• Class Audio CDs
• Teacher’s Book with Test Master Multi-ROM
• Photocopiable Test Book with A and B tests
• Two DVDs - Kirsty’s Secret and Life in Britain
www.pearsonlongman.com

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Mugglestone Abbs Freebairn

• New characters, dialogues and situations engage students’ interest.
• New reading and listening passages keep students motivated.
• New cross-cultural and cross-curricular content bring the world into the classroom.
• New testing package covers all your assessment needs.
• Updated Activity Book provides practice and graded exercises for mixed ability classes.


3

Teacher’s Book

Patricia Mugglestone
Brian Abbs
Ingrid Freebairn
26/9/08 16:21:42


3

Teacher’s Book

Patricia Mugglestone
Brian Abbs
Ingrid Freebairn
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Pearson Education Limited
Edinburgh Gate, Harlow
Essex, CM20 2JE, England
and Associated Companies throughout the world
www.pearsonlongman.com
© Brian Abbs, Ingrid Freebairn and Pearson Education Limited 2009
All rights reserved: no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a
retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical,
photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission of the
copyright holders.
The rights of Patricia Mugglestone, Brian Abbs and Ingrid Freebairn to be identified
as authors of this book have been asserted by them in accordance with the Copyright,
Designs and Patents Act 1988.
First published 2009
Illustrated by Humberto Blanco, Nigel Kitching and Sean Longcroft
Set in 10/11pt Times New Roman
Printed in Malaysia, KHL(CTP)
ISBN: 978-1-4058-7483-0 (Teacher’s Book for Pack)
ISBN: 978-1-4058-7491-5 (Test Master Multi-Rom for Pack)
ISBN: 978-1-4082-0597-6 (Teacher’s Book and Test Master Multi-Rom Pack)
Photocopying
The Publisher grants permission for the photocopying of those pages marked
‘photocopiable’ according to the following conditions. Individual purchasers may
make copies for their own use or for use by the classes they teach. Institutional
purchasers may make copies for use by their staff and students, but this permission
does not extend to additional institutions or branches.
Under no circumstances may any part of this book be photocopied for resale.

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Contents
Introduction
General description ................................................... 7

Specific procedures ................................................ 11































1 Who the course is for
2 What the course is about
3 How the students learn
4 How the syllabus is constructed
5 How the material is organised

Principles behind the course ................................... 7








1 Capturing young learners’ attention
2 Making language learning active
3 Keeping learning goals clear
4 Keeping pace with the learners’ development
5 Supporting and monitoring students’ progress
6 Using language learning for general educational
   purposes

Course components .................................................. 8
1 The Students’ Book
2 The Activity Book (with Multi-Rom)
3 The Teacher’s Book (with Test Master
   Multi-Rom)
4 The Class CDs
5 The Test Book
6 The DVDs
General teaching techniques ................................... 9
















1 The role of the native language (L1)
2 Presentation
3 Photographs and illustrations
4 Vocabulary
5 The board
6 Repetition and choral practice
7 Pronunciation
8 Question patterns
9 Pair work
10 Group work
11 Oral correction
12 Homework and homework correction
13 Revision and assessment
14 Classroom language

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1 Listen and read dialogues and texts
2 Everyday phrases
3 Look and learn
4 New words
5 Speak
6 English in action
7 Games and Puzzles
8 Songs
9 Limericks
10 Sounds fun
11 Listen
12 Read
13 Write
14 Across cultures
15 Across the curriculum
16 Project
17 Writing tips and Study tips
18 Picture story
19 Revision
20 Chat time
21 Lesson by lesson word list
22 Max’s Grammar Store
23 The CEF Portfolio

Before you start ...................................................... 15






1 Timing
2 Classroom equipment and material
3 The first lesson
4 Abbreviations used in the Teacher’s Book

Students’ Book contents ...................................... 16
Teaching notes ....................................................... 18
Photocopiable resources ...................................... 102

Resource teaching notes
Resources
Activity Book Answer key and Audio script ...... 130
Word list . ............................................................... 140

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How does New Sky work?
New Sky has forty lessons divided into eight cycles. This is how one cycle works:

Students’ Book

Activity Book

Teacher’s Book

Lesson 1

Lesson 1

Lesson 1

Presentation and
practice

Accuracy
practice

Teaching
notes

Lesson 2

Lesson 2

Lesson 2

Presentation and
practice

Accuracy
practice

Teaching
notes

Lesson 3

Lesson 3

Lesson 3

Presentation and
practice

Accuracy
practice

Teaching
notes

Lesson 4

Lesson 4

Lesson 4

Across cultures +
Project/Across the
curriculum + Project
+ Picture story

Skills and consolidation
(Fluency
practice)

Teaching
notes

Lesson 5

Lesson 5

Lesson 5

Revision

Check and
self-assessment

Teaching
notes

Test Book: Photocopiable A and B tests

(plus rewritable versions on Test Master Multi-Rom)
Test 1

A

B

Skills Test 1

Language: Lessons 1–3
Grammar and
Vocabulary

Skills: Lessons 1–9
Reading, Writing,
Listening and
Communication

Test 2

Review Test 1

A

B

Language: Lessons 6–8
Grammar and
Vocabulary

Revision:
Lessons 1–3; 6–8

A1
Test

B

A

A

B

B

A1
Skills Test

B

Language: Lessons 1–3
Grammar and
Vocabulary

Skills: Lessons 1–9
Reading, Writing,
Listening and
Communication

A2
Test

A1
Review Test

B

Language: Lessons 6–8
Grammar and
Vocabulary

B

Revision:
Lessons 1–3; 6–8

4

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New Sky also offers extra materials:

In the Students’ Book:
• A Grammar Store

• Twenty-four
Photocopiable
resources

• A lesson-by-lesson
Word list

• Answer keys
• Audio scripts
• An alphabetical Word
list with phonetic
transcriptions

In the Activity Book:
• Four Puzzle Stories
One story for every
ten lessons

• Two plays
One for use half-way
through the book and
one for use at the end

A Student Multi-Rom
New Sky Three

Student
Multi-Rom

In the Teacher’s Book:

• Interactive language
practice
• Activity Book
audio material

Class CDs
New Sky Three

• All Students’ Book
audio material

Class CD1

Test Master Multi-Rom
• Rewritable versions
of the Test Book tests
• Test Book
audio material

New Sky Three

Test Master
Multi-Rom

Two DVDs
New Sky Three

New Sky Three

Life in Britain
DVD

Kirsty’s Secret
DVD

• A culture DVD
showing teenage
lifestyles in the UK
• A teenage drama

5

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introduCTION

Introduction
General description

1 Who the course is for

New Sky is a four-part course for young learners of English
aged from 9/10 to 13/14. There are two possible entry points:
New Sky Starter for complete beginners or for students with
a minimal knowledge of English, and New Sky One for false
beginners.

• introducing real characters with whom young learners can
identify
• showing real-life situations which children can immediately
recognise and respond to
• presenting lively, everyday language and expressions
which they will want to learn

2 Making language learning active

New Sky Three features a typical British family and a typical
Australian family living in East London. Together, they are
seen in domestic and leisure settings. The real characters
and the authentic photographs and situations provide an
up-to-date realistic view of the UK today – its people, their
lifestyles and their cultural background. Although the main
focus is the UK, the learners also get regular glimpses of life
in Australia and other English-speaking countries.

Young learners need to be actively involved in the language
lesson. This not only makes learning more effective but also
makes it more enjoyable. In New Sky, students are involved
when they:
• repeat and act dialogues
• communicate and share information with others
• solve reading and listening tasks
• write in simple, real-life contexts
• play language games
• sing and roleplay

3 How the students learn

3 Keeping learning goals clear

2 What the course is about

New language is presented through dialogue or text, and
practised in a series of simple steps which include carefully
graded listening, speaking, reading and writing activities, and
a lively selection of games, songs and limericks. From the
beginning, students learn to communicate information and
ideas in realistic and amusing situations.

The language syllabus is a careful mix of grammar, vocabulary
and communication. Grammatical structures are linked
closely to everyday language use, while the topic areas relate
to the students’ own lives and experiences, and have been
specially chosen to present a range of useful vocabulary.

If learners are to stay motivated and make progress, it is
important to keep learning goals simple. An over-heavy
vocabulary load can be daunting, especially if the words are
low frequency. Equally, too many new grammar points in
one lesson can be confusing. Each lesson of New Sky keeps
learning simple by:
• focusing on a limited number of grammar points
• presenting grammar in clear and prominent Look and
learn boxes
• revising the new language regularly through stories,
exercises and puzzles
• introducing a carefully regulated number of words
• presenting key new words with pictures and sound

5 How the material is organised

4 Keeping pace with the learners’ development

4 How the syllabus is constructed

Each lesson in the Students’ Book is presented on a doublepage spread in order to foster a sense of achievement and
progress in the student. Clear signposting of each activity
enables both teacher and student to identify the learning
focus at every stage of the lesson. For more details on the
organisation of the Student’s Book, see Course components.

Principles behind the course

1 Capturing young learners’ attention

We believe it is essential that young learners’ contact with
learning English should be rewarding and fun. The first step
towards this is to capture their attention as soon as they open
their new textbook. New Sky does this by:
• using colourful, authentic location photography

A language course for young learners is more effective if it
keeps pace with the children’s physical, cognitive and social
development. In New Sky, the learners’ physical development
is mirrored in the main characters; their cognitive development
is reflected in the subject matter and organisation of the texts
and task types; and their social development – how they
interact with peer groups and adults, and how confident they
feel about themselves – is reflected in the methodology, in
particular with the types of activities, projects and games
suggested for language practice.

5 Supporting and monitoring students’ progress

It is important that young learners have regular opportunities
to consolidate the language they learn and are also given the
means to monitor their own progress.

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New Sky helps students to revise and check progress
through:
• Skills lessons in the Students’ Book (Across cultures
and Across the curriculum) and the Activity Book (Skills
practice). These consolidate and extend the language
and skills learnt in the preceding cycle of work, while
developing students’ knowledge of the world beyond the
classroom.
• Picture stories at the end of the Students’ Book.
• Revision lessons and What can you do? boxes in the
Students’ Book and Revision lessons in the Activity Book,
the latter containing self-assessment boxes to encourage
students to monitor their own progress.
• A booklet of photocopiable tests, containing parallel A and
B tests to minimise students’ opportunities for copying
their neighbours’ answers, as well as rewritable versions
of these tests on the Test Master Multi-Rom supplied with
this book.
• Interactive language practice with the Multi-Rom
accompanying the Activity Book.

6 Using language learning for general
educational purposes
Learning a new language can be more motivating for
young learners when they realise they can learn about the
outside world through their English lessons. New Sky aims
to increase students’ awareness of the world outside the
classroom through texts relating to children and situations
in other countries. The Across cultures lessons, in particular,
increase students’ knowledge of the English-speaking world,
and the linked projects encourage them to write about their
own lives and experiences. There are also special Across
the curriculum lessons in New Sky, which present topics of
interest relating to other subjects in the school curriculum.
In this way students use English to extend their general
education.

Course components
At each level the course consists of:
• a Students’ Book
• an Activity Book (with Multi-Rom)
• this Teacher’s Book (with Test Master Multi-Rom)
• Class CDs
• a Test Book
DVDs also accompany the course.

1 The Students’ Book

The Students’ Book consists of forty lessons. These are
divided into eight sections of five lessons. Each section
follows a pattern:
Lesson 1 Language input
Lesson 2 Language input
Lesson 3 Language input
Lesson 4 Across cultures + Project
Lesson 5 Revision
Lesson 6 Language input

Lesson 7 Language input
Lesson 8 Language input
Lesson 9 Across the curriculum + Project
Lesson 10Revision
Language input lesson: Presents and practises new
language
Across cultures:Develops skills, and recycles and
expands language by looking
at culture and lifestyles in the
English-speaking world
Across the curriculum: Develops skills, and recycles and
expands language by looking at
topics which are related to other
areas of the school curriculum
Project:
Encourages self-expression
Revision:
Provides a controlled progress
check
At the back of the Students’ Book, there are four Picture
Story lessons. These two-page comic strip stories recycle the
language which has been used in Lessons 1–9, 11–19, 21–29
and 31–39. Also at the back of the Students’ Book are:
• the words of the recorded Songs and Limericks
• a grammar reference: Max’s Grammar Store
• a lesson-by-lesson Word list

2 The Activity Book (with Multi-Rom)

The Activity Book, to be used in class or for homework, gives
further extensive practice of the language in each input lesson
of the Students’ Book. Many exercises are at two levels, a)
and b), to cater for mixed ability classes. The first level, e.g.
2a is a basic exercise and 2b is a more challenging exercise. At
regular intervals, skills sections reinforce students’ reading,
writing and listening skills. For added interest, and to recycle
the Everyday phrases from the Students’ Book, the skills
sections also contain short cartoon strips featuring regular
characters. Frequent Revision sections, with self-assessment
boxes, enable students and their teachers to monitor progress.
There are also six additional songs at regular intervals. At the
back of the Activity Book is a unique Stories and Sketches
section. This contains four Puzzle Stories designed to
encourage students to read for pleasure, and two light-hearted
plays for students to act in the middle and at the end of
the year.
The Student Multi-Rom that accompanies the Activity Book
contains:
• interactive language practice
• the Activity Book listening activities, stories, plays and
songs

3 The Teacher’s Book (with Test Master
Multi-Rom)
In addition to the Introduction, this Teacher’s Book contains
detailed lesson-by-lesson teaching notes. The notes include
keys for exercises, suggested model answers, audio scripts
of the listening material, suggestions for extra games and

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The Test Master Multi-Rom that accompanies this book
contains:
• rewritable tests (as in the Test Book, see below)
• the test audio material

4 The Class CDs

These contain recordings of the following:
• presentation dialogues and texts, new words, listening
activities, Sounds fun pronunciation activities and the
songs and limericks from the Students’ Book. The audio
scripts for the Students’ Book are printed in the appropriate
lessons in this Teacher’s Book.

5 The Test Book

The Test Book contains: eight progress tests – one for every
five lessons of the Students’ Book, four skills tests and four
review tests. The tests are presented in A and B sections so
that students sitting in pairs cannot copy each other. There is
also an Answer key and audio script at the back of the Test
Book. Rewritable versions of the tests are available on the
Test Master Multi-Rom, giving teachers the ability to tailor
tests to the specific needs of their students. The test audios
are also included on the Test Master Multi-Rom.

6 The DVDs

Two DVDs provide a motivating context for further
consolidation and extension of language, and help to relate
language learning to the wider world. Life in Britain, a
documentary culture video, provides an insight into the
lives of young teenagers in the UK today. Kirsty’s Secret, a
drama, follows the adventures of four friends whose lives are
changed when a new girl comes to town.

General teaching techniques
1 The role of the native language (L1)
Some teachers will find it necessary to use the students’
native language to introduce the book and explain what is in
it, to establish who the characters are and where they live,
and, importantly, to explain how they want the students to
work. Once lessons start, use of the L1 is helpful to:
• clarify language points
• give instructions for more complicated exercises and
activities
• explain the meaning of some words
• set up games and roleplays

As the course progresses, however, use of English in class
should be increased. Teachers will find that students soon
learn to follow basic instructions in English if they are used
frequently and consistently. Students will also soon learn to
respond to words of encouragement and general remarks.
Any new words which are not illustrated in the Students’
Book can easily be explained through mime, acting or
illustrations on the board.

introduCTION

activities, and ideas for further practice. At the back of the
Teacher’s Book are the following:
• Twenty-four photocopiable resource sheets, one for each
input lesson in the Students’ Book. These contain extra
practice activities for use in class, and are accompanied by
teaching notes.
• The Activity Book answer key and audio script.
• An alphabetical list of Words and expressions with
phonetic transcripts.

2 Presentation

The detailed lesson notes in the main part of this book
suggest a variety of techniques for presenting new language
to young learners. Because there is much for the students to
take in at one time – new structures, words and sounds – the
teacher needs to repeat new language two or three times
before asking students to repeat it. It is also helpful for the
learner to see the written form of the language after the initial
oral presentation.

3 Photographs and illustrations

Photographs and illustrations can be used for scene-setting
and for presenting new language. Questions for each
photograph occur in the lesson notes. Simple questions can
be asked about the characters, their relationship to each other,
what they are wearing, what they are doing and what they are
thinking.

4 Vocabulary

When learning a new language, learning words is as important
as learning grammar. For young learners, it can be especially
motivating to learn new words. Classroom techniques for
presenting new vocabulary at this level include:
• showing or pointing to real objects or pictures in the
Students’ Book
• drawing on the board
• showing flash cards, posters or magazine pictures
• miming and acting
• explaining in the native language (L1) or translating
• using a dictionary
It is essential to keep a regular check on vocabulary so that
new words are continually recycled. Teachers can make flash
cards of new words to use for word games, sentence building
and competitions.

5 The board

Presentation of new language on the whiteboard or interactive
whiteboard is extremely important. It focuses the students’
attention and enables the teacher to control the activity
effectively. Simple line drawings on the board can be used
to explain a new word quickly. New structures, words
and expressions should be written boldly and clearly, and
arranged in sections, e.g. new vocabulary in one area and
examples of key language structures in another. It is a good
idea to keep a free area for spontaneous examples, drawings
and game scores.

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6 Repetition and choral practice

Repetition helps to reinforce a sound or structural pattern.
Repeating in chorus helps students to gain confidence before
they are asked to perform individually. Suggestions for
choral practice occur throughout the detailed lesson notes.
Different choral patterns can be made by using:
• the whole class
• half the class at a time
• vertical or horizontal rows
• groups
• individuals

7 Pronunciation

All new words should be thoroughly practised by means
of choral and individual repetition, using the recording as
a model. The technique of ‘back-chaining’ for repetition
of phrases and sentences can be most effective with young
learners. Students repeat a sentence in parts, starting from
the end and building up to the complete sentence, e.g. Say
after me, everybody. Brother … little brother … he’s my little
brother … .

8 Question patterns

Question and answer patterns play a key part in language
teaching. To give as much oral practice as possible, it is
important to build a sequence of question and answer
patterns, e.g.
• Teacher to self (T-T)
• Teacher to student (T-S)
• Student to teacher (S-T)
• Student to student (S-S)
• Student 1 to Student 2 to Student 3, etc. in a chain
(S1-S2-S3)

9 Pair work

Many of the exercises in New Sky enable the students to work
in pairs. The following patterns are suitable for pair work:
• A–B side by side
• A–A B–B (pairs turn round and face the pair behind
them)
• A–B B–A in a foursome (pairs turn round and talk across
to each other)
• Bs to As across rows
• Random pairs across the class
Students can work in open pairs, e.g. A–B, then B–C, then
C–D, etc. or across the class. In this way, the rest of the class
listens while a pair performs. Open pair work can be useful
if the teacher wants to hear individuals perform. Closed pair
work is also very useful. In spite of the increased noise level,
it dramatically increases talking time and encourages learners
to initiate as well as answer. Moreover, there is less chance of
students getting bored as they listen to others doing exercises
in turn round the class. If there is an uneven number in the
class, the teacher can either make up the pair or ask one
group to work in threes. Although students may protest, it is
important to rearrange the pairs on a regular basis.

10 Group work

For certain types of activity, e.g. acting the stories and
playing games, students may need to work in groups. Group
work is important because it provides an opportunity for
shy students to talk more confidently and teaches students
to cooperate and work together. Groups can be formed in
different ways, based on:
• position (students turn round to form a group of four with
another pair)
• alphabetical order of names (all those with names beginning
with given letters, e.g. A–D in one group)
• birthdays (e.g. all those whose birthdays are in May in one
group)
• colour of clothes, etc.

11 Oral correction

When students are doing controlled practice and the emphasis
is on accuracy, correction should be immediate. It is important
to help students to correct the mistake themselves and
then make them actively repeat the correct version. In the
freer practice stage, e.g. in games and open conversations,
the students’ performance can be monitored and mistakes
noted down to be corrected at the end of a sequence. Overcorrection in the early stages can be de-motivating, especially
for shy, less confident learners.

12 Homework and homework correction

For homework, teachers can set the exercises from the
corresponding lesson in the Activity Book, but they may also
like to use the extra suggestions which are included in the
detailed lesson notes. Written work should not be restricted
to homework. Writing in class varies the pace of a lesson and
gives a change of activity. It is important that homework is
prepared in class beforehand and help given with any new
vocabulary and expressions which may be needed. Answers
to homework exercises can be checked in different ways:
• Check the answers orally with the whole class.
• Ask individual students to write their answers on the
board.
• Provide a key so that students can correct their own or
their partner’s work.
If students have written a paragraph for homework, ask a
few to read it to the class. The others listen for mistakes and
correct them. Alternatively, select an individual student’s
paragraph. Write it on the board and correct it together with
the class.

13 Revision and assessment

Checking on students’ progress is important for teachers,
learners and parents. Progress can be formally assessed
through revision/check lessons and tests. Informal methods
of assessment can show a learner’s progress and help teachers
to find out problems that the children might have. This can be
done in a variety of ways:
• A few minutes of informal oral revision at the beginning
of each lesson focusing on one or more language points
from previous lessons
• Regular spot checks on vocabulary and grammar

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14 Classroom language

Instructions
Act the dialogue/story.
Ask and answer in pairs.
Can you repeat, please?
Can you spell it?
Change parts.
Come to the front.
Copy this into your books.
Do exercise (5) for homework.
Don’t look at the book.
Fill in the chart.
Learn by heart.
Listen.
Listen and say/repeat after me.
Listen to this/the dialogue.
Look.
Look at this.
Make two teams.
Open/close your book.
Open your book at page (27).
Put a tick in the right column.
Read.
Read this/the text silently/out loud.
Repeat.
Sit down/Stand up.
Sit next to (Paolo).
Speak.
Use a pen/pencil/ruler.
Work in groups.
Work in pairs.
Work on your own.
Write.
Write the answers in your notebook.
Feedback and encouragement
Excellent!
Good!/Very good!
That’s right/not quite right.
Try again.
Well done!
Discipline
Be quiet, please.
Don’t speak (Spanish).
No talking.
Speak English, please.
Work quietly, please.

introduCTION

• Short gapped dictations of dialogues or texts
• Oral checks to revise communicative functions and
everyday language, e.g. You meet your teacher in the
street. What do you say?
• Completing checklists of what the students can do in
English with a tick (✓), cross (✗) or question mark (?), e.g.
Now you can:
•  talk about places in towns
•  talk about past activities
• Students can also record their progress and their
achievements through the Portfolio, which can be found
online at www.pearsonlongman.com/ae/cef/cef.htm

Specific procedures

1 Listen and read dialogues and texts

Many of the new grammatical structures in the input lessons
are presented in short, conversational dialogues or texts.
These are all recorded. Play the recording once for students
to listen and read. Then play the recording again, this time
pausing at the end of each section for students to listen and
repeat. The dialogues and texts are followed by a Check
exercise to check students’ comprehension.
Procedure for dialogues and texts
• Ask students to look at the photograph(s).
• If appropriate, revise what they know about the characters,
e.g. their name, age, relationship.
• In the case of dialogues, use the L1 to talk about where the
characters are, what they are doing, what they are feeling
and thinking, and point out any interesting features in the
photograph.
• Present and explain any new vocabulary and expressions.
• Play the dialogue or text for students to follow in their
books.
• Play it again. Stop the recording at intervals to check
understanding and to do choral practice of selected words
and phrases.
• Play the dialogue or part of the text again for students to
listen and repeat, pausing after each sentence.
• Do any Check exercises with the whole class or ask
students to do them in pairs.
• Ask students to read and act a dialogue in pairs or groups.
Choose one or two pairs/groups to act the dialogue for the
class.

2 Everyday phrases

Conversational words and phrases from the dialogue which
are used in everyday idiomatic English are presented in
a box called Everyday phrases. These are separate from
the grammatical focus of the lesson. Students should learn
these by heart, and every opportunity should be made to use
them in class. Do not attempt to explain the grammar behind
the phrases.
Procedure
• Read each word or phrase aloud and ask students to repeat
it chorally and individually.
• Ask individual students to find the specific word or phrase
in the dialogue and read out the whole line.
• Check that students understand the meaning and ask them
to translate the relevant word or phrase.

3 Look and learn

The Look and learn boxes contain examples of the
grammatical focus of the lesson and draw attention to points
of grammar which need special explanation.
Procedure
• Ask individual students to read the example in the box.
• Say the examples yourself and ask the whole class to
repeat after you.
• In the L1 point out any special grammatical features.

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• Ask students to find the sentences which contain the
structure in the dialogue or text.
• Use the detailed lesson notes in this Teacher’s Book for
suggestions for further practice.

4 New words

Key new vocabulary in the input lessons is presented in a
special section of its own, under the heading New words.
This section can occur either at the beginning or in the body
of the lesson. Each word is recorded, so that students can
hear the correct pronunciation. After the repetition stage,
there is often an activity to match the word with the correct
illustration.
Procedure
• Draw attention to the list of new words.
• Play the recording and ask the students to repeat each
word, first chorally then individually.
• If the words are presented as part of a matching exercise,
ask the students to look at the pictures and match them
with the words.
• Check the answers.
• Revise the new words in subsequent lessons. Use real
objects in the classroom whenever possible.

5 Speak

The Speak exercises involve controlled spoken exchanges,
often using words, illustrations or photos for cues. It is
important to show clearly what is expected of the students by
giving an example yourself.
Procedure
• Read the instruction to the exercise and the example
sentence or exchange.
• Go through the individual words, pictures or cues that the
students will need for the exercise and make sure that they
understand them.
• Choose one or two pairs of students to do the first example
aloud for the class.
• Correct if necessary and check pronunciation.
• Either get students to do the exercise in open pairs or set
students to work in closed pairs.
• Go round and monitor.

6 English in action

To add variety to their speaking practice, students are often
asked to roleplay a situation or exchange. The procedure is
the same as for the Speak exercises.

7 Games and Puzzles

Any language practice that has a competitive, amusing or
puzzle element to it is called a Game or a Puzzle. Games
and puzzles are an entertaining and valuable way for young
learners to practise new language. Simple games appear from
time to time in the language input lessons, whereas more
elaborate games and puzzles are included at the end of each
Revision lesson.
Procedure
• Explain in the L1, then read the instructions in English.

• Present any new vocabulary.
• Choose a student or pair of students to do the first example
in front of the class.
• Correct if necessary, then ask students to play the game or
do the puzzle.
• If appropriate, check who won the game or who successfully
completed the puzzle.

8 Songs

As well as being fun, singing songs changes the pace of
a lesson. Songs give intensive listening practice and are a
natural context for repetition. There are four contemporary
pop songs in New Sky Three Students’ Book. These occur at
regular intervals in the input lessons. The complete song is
printed in the reference section at the back of the Students’
Book and the song title appears in the appropriate place in the
lesson. There are an additional six songs at regular intervals
in the Activity Book.
Procedure
• Allow plenty of time for the song in your lesson plan.
• Give students time to read through the song. Explain new
words.
• Play the song once or twice for students to listen.
• Play the song again and ask students to join in.
• If appropriate, divide the class into pairs or groups and
allot different verses or parts of the song to each pair or
group.
• Play the song again and ask the different groups to sing
their verse.

9 Limericks

Like songs, limericks are fun and can add variety to a lesson.
They also provide excellent practice in stress, rhythm and
pronunciation in an entertaining way. There are four limericks
in New Sky Three occurring at regular intervals. The limericks
have gaps for the students to listen and complete.
Procedure
• Play the limerick through once. Check vocabulary.
• Play it once or twice again and ask students to complete
the gaps.
• Encourage students to think about the rhythm. Explain
that lines one, two and five contain three beats and rhyme,
and lines three and four have two beats and rhyme.
• Divide students into groups so that they can listen and say
the limerick.

10 Sounds fun

Amusing tongue twisters and rhymes appear at regular
intervals in the Revision lessons to practise a particular
sound of English. These are recorded.
Procedure
• Play the Sounds fun recording for students to hear the
whole rhyme or sentence.
• Help the students to produce the sound in question if they
are having difficulty.
• Play the recording again and ask students to underline the
sounds.

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11 Listen

The listening comprehension activities in the Students’ Book
include short conversations, games, interviews, instructions
and radio programmes.
Procedure
• Before the lesson starts, read the audio script or play the
recording.
• In the lesson, set the context of the listening in the L1.
• Read the instructions and make sure the students know
what to do.
• Present any new words and expressions.
• Play the recording through without stopping.
• Play the recording again, stopping when students have to
write, choose an answer, or complete a task.
• Check the answers and play the recording again.

12 Read

Reading is a key skill in general education and academic
progress. New Sky emphasises reading from the beginning.
As well as presentation texts (see page 11: Listen and read
dialogues and texts) many lessons contain a short reading text.
The Picture stories (to be used after Lessons 9, 19, 29 and 39)
provide easy, entertaining reading material. The Across cultures
lessons (Lessons 4, 14, 24 and 34) contain cross-cultural
reading texts about English-speaking countries. The Across the
curriculum lessons (Lessons 9, 19, 29 and 39) contain crosscurricular reading texts. New vocabulary for active learning
is highlighted in a special New words section on the page.
To give the students’ reading skills an additional boost, there
are four ‘James Blonde’ Puzzle Stories at the end of the
Activity Book.
Procedure
• Read the title of the reading text.
• Ask the students to describe in the L1 what they can see in
the picture(s) and say what they think the text or texts are
going to be about.
• Present any important new words.
• Play the recording or read the texts aloud yourself while
the students follow in their books.
• Read the texts again, stopping to explain or check
understanding.
• Ask the students to read the text silently to themselves.
• Ask the Check questions or get students to do the Check
task. You can ask a few more comprehension questions if
you wish.

13 Write

Writing activities range from controlled sentence writing
to simple paragraphs, notes, postcards, emails and letters.
Many of the writing activities are based on the reading texts
as models. Most writing tasks can be set for homework but
should be prepared in class. However, short writing activities
like sentence completion can be done in class to vary the
pace of the lesson. The following procedure is suitable for
modelled paragraph writing.

Procedure
• Read the model text.
• Read the instructions for the writing task and make sure
by using the L1 that students understand what they have
to write.
• Ask if there are any new words they want to know for their
own writing.
• Ask a student to write the first sentence on the board. The
others can suggest the next sentence and so on.
• Continue until the whole text is written.
• Ask students to write their own paragraph for homework.

introduCTION

• Ask individual students to say the whole rhyme on its
own.

14 Across cultures

New Sky Three Students’ Book includes four special ‘culture’
lessons called Across cultures which come at Lessons 4,
14, 24 and 34. These integrate and consolidate the language
of the previous cycle of lessons and provide additional
integrated skills practice in reading, speaking and listening.
Each of the Across cultures lessons highlights a different
cultural aspect of the UK.
Procedure
• Read the title of the lesson and translate if necessary.
• If relevant, ask the students what they know about the
topic area, e.g. sport in the UK.
• Refer students to the photos on the pages and ask what
they can see.
• Present any new vocabulary.
• Play the recording or read the text(s) aloud. You may like
to set a few simple comprehension questions first.
• Ask students to do the Check activity individually or in
pairs. Give an example first.
• Check the answers and continue with any other tasks.

15 Across the curriculum

There are also four special Across the curriculum lessons
in New Sky Three which come at Lessons 9, 19, 29 and 39.
The Across the curriculum lessons present topics of interest
relating to other subjects in the school curriculum such as
Science, Geography and Information Technology (IT). In this
way students use English to extend their general education.
The lessons consolidate the language of the previous cycle
of lessons and provide additional integrated skills practice in
reading, speaking and listening.
Procedure
• Read the title of the lesson and translate if necessary.
• If relevant, ask the students what they know about the
topic area, e.g. the solar system.
• Refer students to the illustrations and/or photos on the
page and ask what they can see.
• Present any new vocabulary. (See page 12: New words.)
• Play the recording or read the text(s) aloud. You may like
to set a few simple comprehension questions first.
• Ask students to do the Check activity individually or in
pairs. Give an example first.
• Check the answers and continue with any other tasks.

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16 Project

Each Across cultures and Across the curriculum lesson ends
with a Project, which is thematically and linguistically linked
to the text of the lesson. The project provides students with
an opportunity to produce a piece of work based on their own
lives and experiences, while at the same time consolidating
the language they have learnt. The original texts often serve
as a useful model. In addition each project has a helpful guide
and a further model to get students started with their writing.
If you choose to set the project for homework, spend a few
minutes in class to prepare the students for this.
Procedure
• Start with a few minutes of conversation to relate the topic
to the students’ own lives and experiences.
• Read any extra text aloud to the students. Explain that this
should serve as a model for their writing.
• If the project suggests that the students draw something or
find photographs, ask the students to do this first.
• Ask a student to write the first sentence on the board.
Repeat the same procedures as for Write page. In some
cases, students may work on a project in pairs.
• Go round and monitor as students write their projects.
Encourage them to use bold colours so that you can make
a colourful display of their projects on the classroom walls
or in the corridor.
• Collect in the students’ finished work and display it.

17 Writing tips and Study tips

All the projects in the Across cultures lessons are supported
by a Writing tip, e.g. words with difficult spelling. The
projects in the Across the curriculum lessons are supported
by a Study tip, e.g. using a dictionary. Both types of tip are
accompanied by a simple task.

18 Picture story

There are four individual Picture stories in New Sky Three.
These are grouped at the back of the Students’ Book, but can
be used after Lessons 9, 19, 29 and 39. They bring together
and consolidate the structures and vocabulary from the
previous lessons. Any new words are listed below the story in
a New words box. All four stories are recorded.
Procedure
• Introduce the setting for the story.
• Present some of the new vocabulary from the New words
section.
• Play the recording, dividing the story into sections. Ask
students to follow it in their books.
• Pause after each section to check understanding and ask
questions.
• Play the complete story again without stopping.
• Students complete the Check exercise individually and
compare their answers.
• In pairs or groups, students write a scene or scenes from
the story as a dialogue.
• Encourage students to suggest different endings for the
story, then get them to write an ending. Individual students
can read their endings to the class.

• Ask different groups to act out the story in front of the
class. Encourage the students to memorise their part if
they can.

19 Revision

The regular Revision lessons give students a chance to
measure their progress and enable teachers to identify areas
of difficulty which need extra practice. The Revision lessons
contain exercises and activities to revise grammar and
vocabulary, guided roleplay exercises called Chat time (see
below) to test the students’ spoken language in use and often a
Game or Puzzle which gives special revision of one or more
language items and may be done in pairs or individually.
They also contain the Sounds fun exercises (see Section 10,
pages 12–13). The final part, What can you do?, focuses on
the language and functions students have practised in the
cycle of lessons and encourages them to evaluate how well
they ‘can do’ things in English.

20 Chat time

Guided roleplay exercises occur in every Revision lesson.
They provide another opportunity for students to use the
language they have learnt in a communicative setting and
give students another chance to talk about themselves.
Procedure
• Establish the situation clearly.
• Ask the students to read through the cues and think about
what they would say.
• Ask a student to read the example exchange.
• Give students time to read the cues and write the
conversation.
• Encourage students to expand the conversation and use
everyday phrases that they know.
• Ask students to work in pairs, taking turns to play each
role. Go round and listen.
• Select some of the pairs to act their conversation for the
class to hear.
• Play the recording for students to listen and compare the
conversation with their own.

21 Lesson by lesson Word list

New vocabulary should be revised regularly using the
lesson-by-lesson list of words at the back of the Students’
Book. Only those words which the students are required to
produce in either spoken or written form are listed. Where
appropriate, those words which form a lexical group are
linked under a general heading, e.g. clothes. At the back of
the Teacher’s Book there is an alphabetical list of words and
expressions with phonetic transcriptions provided.

22 Max’s Grammar Store

At the back of the Students’ Book there is a grammar
reference section called Max’s Grammar Store. This sets
out in clear tables the grammatical structures introduced
in New Sky Three. Draw attention to this section at the
beginning of the course so that students can refer to it when
they need to. It can also be useful for revision purposes.

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Go to www.pearsonlongman.com/ae/cef/cef.htm to use the
English Language Portfolio that accompanies this Teacher’s
Book. It is based upon the requirements of the Common
European Framework of References for Languages, which
was developed by the Council of Europe. The Portfolio is
designed as a learning companion for the student. It enables
the learner to record details of his/her language learning and
to demonstrate his/her language achievements by collecting
examples of work in English. Exercises in the Students’ Book
that can contribute to the students’ Portfolios are indicated by
a Portfolio logo. Explanatory teacher’s notes are provided in
the opening pages of the Portfolio.

AmE
BrE
e.g.
etc.
i.e.
sing
pl

introduCTION

23 The CEF Portfolio

American English
British English
for example
etcetera
that is
singular
plural

Before you start

1 Timing

New Sky Three, including both Students’ Book and Activity
Book, provides approximately ninety to one hundred and
twenty hours’ work. Each lesson in the Students’ Book
corresponds in most cases to one teaching period but some
lessons may take longer if all the suggestions for Further
practice are taken up. Most of the exercises in the Activity
Book, except for the listening activities, can be set for
homework.

2 Classroom equipment and material

It is important to check in the detailed teaching notes for
each lesson to see if any extra materials are suggested for
the lesson. As a general rule, it is useful to have in the
classroom:
• a map of the world/atlas
• a good dictionary (e.g. Longman Active Study Dictionary)
• a model clock
• a set of flash cards
• a bag of everyday items for vocabulary teaching
• a pin board or an area to display students’ work, notices,
interesting pictures, etc.

3 The first lesson

The first lesson with a new book can sometimes be bewildering.
Begin in the L1 with short discussion of the sort of activities
the students will be engaged in. Give the students a ‘guided
tour’ of the contents of the Students’ Book while you draw
attention to the different features. Stress how important it
is to speak English as much as possible and to imitate the
sounds of English as closely as they can.

4 Abbreviations used in the Teacher’s Book
T
S
Ss
T-S
S-S
S1-S2
L1
SB
TB
AB

Teacher
Student
Students
Teacher speaks to student
Student speaks to student
First student speaks to second student and so on
Native language
Students’ Book
Teacher’s Book
Activity Book

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1

They’re making a film.

LESSON OBJECTIVES

structures

Present simple and Present continuous: positive,
negative and questions

Functions

Ask and talk about personal information
Say what is happening

Vocabulary

Places in town (Memory check)
Everyday phrases: Look! What’s happening? Oh,
right. Quick! Excuse me!

Background information

• Alex Rider /"lIks 'raIdə/ is the title character in
the popular Alex Rider series of novels by British
author Anthony Horowitz. Alex is the teenage
agent for MI6, the British international intelligence
service.
• Alex Pettyfer /"lIks 'petIfə/, born 1990, is an
English actor. He played Alex Rider in the film
Stormbreaker, 2006.
• Melbourne: capital city of Victoria, Australia.
Population 3.2 million.
• London City Airport is only 10 km from the centre
of London. It handles flights throughout the UK and
mainland Europe.
• Keira Knightley /"kIərə 'naItli/, born 1985, is a
British actress. She began acting professionally at
the age of seven.
• International Schools are found in most capital
cities of the world. They are private schools with
an international student population. The medium of
education is English.

Getting started
• If this is the first lesson with the class, greet the Ss and
introduce yourself.
• Introduce Ss to the activities and the features of the SB,
using L1. See the advice about ‘The first lesson’ on page
15 in the TB.
• Revise Present simple questions and answers in
preparation for Lesson 1, using vocabulary your Ss
already know. Ask questions for Ss to answer, e.g.
What’s your/his/her name? How old are you? Where
do you live? What sports do you like? If necessary,
encourage Ss to help each other with the answers.

1

1
02

Listen and read

• Ask Ss to look at the picture on page 4 and guess
where it is and what the people are doing. If necessary,
ask questions, e.g. What sort of place is this? What’s
happening? Can you describe one person in the picture?
(appearance, clothes, age). If you feel Ss may not cope
well with using Present simple and Present continuous in
their answers, use just one of the verb forms at this stage.
• Play the recording two or three times for Ss to listen and
read. Check that Ss understand the meaning of building,
spy, accent and autograph.
• Divide the class into four groups to be Jake, Ollie, Rose
and Jess. Play the recording again, this time leaving a
pause after each sentence for the groups to listen and
repeat their lines and then change roles.

2 Check
• Look at the example item with the class. Ask Ss to find
the part of the dialogue that gives the answer (Yes, we’re
from Melbourne).
• Ss work individually, referring to the dialogue and
correcting the sentences.
• When checking answers, ask Ss to read out the complete
correct sentences.
• After checking Ss’ answers, ask them if they have got
any famous people’s autographs.
Answers
2 They’re from Melbourne. 3 Ollie has got an
Australian accent. 4 His dad works for an airline
company. 5 Jake and Rose live in East London.
6 Rose asks Alex Pettyfer for his autograph.

Everyday phrases
• Ask Ss to read and repeat the phrases after you several
times.
• Ask Ss what they say in their L1 for each phrase.

Look and learn
• Encourage Ss to say what they remember about the
Present simple and Present continuous. Refer Ss to Max’s
Grammar Store (page 95).
• Ss read and complete the sentences in the Look and learn
box. Check that Ss remember the third person singular
form of both verb tenses.

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Present simple:
Positive
He/She lives in Melbourne.
Negative
I/We don’t live in Manchester.
He/She doesn’t live in Sydney.
Questions
Where do you live?
Where does your dad work?
Present continuous:
Positive
He/She’s/is talking to a film star.
Negative
I’m/am/They’re/are not making a TV programme.
He/She isn’t talking to me.
Questions
What’s/is he doing?
Where are you living right now?

5 English in action: Personal
information
• Read out the instructions and question prompts.
• Elicit the questions and example answers from the
Ss. Check the use of the Present simple and Present
continuous verb forms.
• Ss work in pairs, acting out the conversation and
changing roles. Monitor but do not interrupt Ss’ fluency.
Make a note of any general problems with verb forms
and go over these with the whole class afterwards.
• If time, some of the pairs can act out their roleplay for
the class.
Answers
Where do you come from? What are you doing here?
Where are you staying? Where do you go to school?
What sports do you play? Do you want to have a
hamburger?

6 Memory check: Places in town
3 Read and write
• Encourage Ss to say what they know about Keira
Knightley, using English as much as possible.
• Read aloud the sentences in the introduction to the
article.
• Advise Ss to read the rest of the article quickly for
general understanding. Ss then work individually, reading
and completing the gaps with the correct verb forms. Ss
can compare answers in pairs before checking answers as
a class.
• Check Ss’ answers by asking individuals to read aloud
the sentences. Explain or encourage Ss to guess the
meaning of any new words.
Answers
1 works 2 makes 3 is having 4 isn’t staying
5 is living 6 loves 7 goes 8 go 9 don’t know
10 think 11 ’m/am enjoying

4

1
03

Listen

• Give Ss time to read through the information about Ollie
on the card.
• Play the recording, several times if necessary, for Ss to
listen and complete the information.
• Check Ss’ answers by asking individuals to make
sentences, e.g. Ollie is fourteen. Check spelling of the
answers where necessary.
Answers
Age fourteen
School International School (in the middle of London)
Home town Melbourne
Favourite sport tennis
Favourite food hamburger

• Look at the example item with the class. Elicit the
answers to the second item.
• Ss work in pairs, reading the cues and suggesting which
two places the people want to go to. Monitor and help Ss
if necessary.
• Check pronunciation and spelling when checking Ss’
answers. Point out that there may be more than one
possible answer for some of the places. If Ss ask about
the use of the definite article (the) with station, bus
station and cinema, explain (in L1) that we use ‘the’
when there is only one of these places in the town, e.g.
there is probably more than one car park but only one
train station in a town.

Teacher’s Notes

Answers

Answers
2 a restaurant and a disco/a club 3 a coffee bar/a
café and a music shop/a record shop 4 a bank and a
supermarket 5 a bookshop and a post office 6 a bus
stop/the bus station and the cinema

7 Write

Portfolio

• Read through the instructions and questions with the
class. Ss may need time to find out information about the
film or pop star they choose.
• Advise Ss to refer to the magazine article about Keira
Knightley to help them. Ss write their article with the
title ‘Star profile’.
• Check Ss’ draft article and point out any errors for
them to correct before they write out the final version.
Encourage Ss to attach a picture of their chosen star to
their article.
• If there is space in your classroom, Ss can make a
display of their articles.

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2

I like this one.

LESSON OBJECTIVES

structures

Object pronoun: one(s)
Going to future for plans and intentions: positive,
negative and questions
Present continuous for future arrangements: positive,
negative and questions

Functions

Ask and talk about your plans and intentions
Ask and talk about your future arrangements

Vocabulary

Money (Memory check)
Everyday phrases: All right. Don’t be late. Hang on!
Don’t be silly. Hurry up [you two]. How much [is
this helmet]? Sure.

Background information

cool is an informal expression of approval. It is used
mainly by young people to mean great/good.

Getting started
• Revise vocabulary of colours by asking Ss to say the
colours of classroom objects, e.g. books, pencils and
their clothes. The colours used in the lesson are red,
black, green, blue, white and brown.
• Revise some of the nouns used in the lesson. Show
actual objects or pictures of them and elicit the words
and the colours: sunglasses, baseball cap, (cycle) helmet,
trainers.

1

1
04

Listen and read

• Ask Ss to look at the picture and say where it is and
what the people are doing. Check that Ss use the Present
simple and Present continuous verb forms appropriately.
• Play the recording for Ss to listen and read. Ask Ss:
What are they buying? (A cycle helmet for Rose), What
time is Dad meeting them? (At four o’clock).
• Explain or encourage Ss to guess the meaning of any
new words. Check that Ss understand the meaning of
‘stripes’ by asking them to look back at the photo on
page 4 and say who is wearing ‘a striped T-shirt’ (Jake
and Rose).
• Play the recording again, this time leaving a pause after
each sentence for Ss to listen and repeat chorally and
individually.
• Ask groups of six Ss to read and act the dialogue, each
S taking one of the parts (Mum, Dad, Rose, Jake, Ranu
and the Man).

Everyday phrases
• Ask Ss to read and repeat the phrases after you several
times.
• Ask Ss what they say in their L1 for each of the phrases.

2 Check
• Read the instruction and check that Ss understand what
to do. Look at the example answer with the class.
• Ss work individually or in pairs, referring to the dialogue
and completing the exercise.
• When checking Ss’ answers, ask them to correct the
wrong sentence.
Answers
2 ✓ 3 ✓ 4 ✓ 5 DK 6 ✗ (Rose buys the helmet)

3

1
05

Memory check: Money

• Ss work in pairs, reading the prices and working out how
to say them.
• Play the recording for Ss to check their answers.
• Then play the recording several times for Ss to listen and
repeat, chorally and individually.
Audio script and answers
a) ninety-nine p/pence b) fifty p/pence c) one pound
d) three pounds e) five pounds fifty f) thirty-seven
pounds ninety-five/thirty-seven ninety-five/thirty-seven
pounds ninety-five pence
Further practice
• If you have any British coins or notes, bring them to the
lesson to show the Ss.
• Write more prices on the board to give Ss further practice
in saying prices. You may like to include some of the
prices that Ss will meet in Exercise 4:
20p £7.85 £95 £13.65 £5.50 £29 £1.75p £49.95
£69.99

Look and learn
• Ask Ss to read and repeat the questions and answers after
you, first using the singular (one) and then using the
plural form (ones).
• Ask Ss to look back at the dialogue and find and read out
sentences containing one or ones.

4 English in action: Shopping
a) Look at the pictures. Complete the conversation
with one/ones and the price.
• Ask Ss to look at the two pictures, identify the objects
(black sunglasses, green sunglasses) and say the prices.
• Give Ss time to read the dialogue and complete it.

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Answers
(Which) ones?
(The green) ones.
(They’re) £7.00/seven pounds.
b) One of you is a customer, the other is a shop
assistant. Look at the pictures and buy the
things.
• Ask Ss to say what the objects are and how much they
are, e.g.
blue cycle helmet, nineteen pounds ninety-nine
red cycle helmet, twenty-two pounds fifty
green baseball cap, four pounds fifty
white baseball cap, seven pounds eighty-five
black trainers, forty-nine pounds ninety-five
white trainers, thirty-two pounds seventy-five
blue jeans, nineteen pounds sixty-five
black jeans, twenty-nine pounds
• Ask two or three open pairs of Ss to make dialogues with
different pictures. Point out that Speaker A says Can I
have one, please? when buying a helmet and a baseball
cap (singular nouns). But Speaker A says Can I have
them, please? when buying trainers and jeans (plural
nouns).
• Ss then work in closed pairs, making dialogues with the
pictures and taking turns to be the customer and the shop
assistant. Monitor and help Ss correct any errors.
• Check answers by asking pairs of Ss to act out their
dialogues for the class.

Look and learn
• Read the going to sentences with the class and ask Ss to
complete them. Point out that going to is used for plans
and intentions. Check that Ss understand the meaning of
plans and intentions.
Answers
I’m not going to buy trainers.
What are you going to buy?
• Read the Present continuous sentences with the class
and ask Ss to complete them. Point out that the Present
continuous is used for future arrangements. Check
that Ss understand the difference in meaning between
arrangements and plans by asking them to translate the
words into their L1.
Answers
I’m not meeting Dad at four o’clock.
When are you meeting Dad?

5 Speak
a) Talk about your plans and intentions.
• Read out the instruction. Ask two Ss to read out the
example question and answer.
• Ask three or four pairs of Ss to work in open pairs,
asking and answering the three questions. Encourage Ss
to give different replies saying what they are going to do
and where they are going to go.
• Ss then work in closed pairs, taking turns to ask and
answer the questions. Monitor and help Ss correct any
errors.
b) Talk about your future arrangements.
• Ask two Ss to read aloud the example question and
answer.
• Ask several pairs of Ss to work in open pairs, asking the
three questions and giving different answers.
• Ss then work in closed pairs, taking turns to ask and
answer the questions. Monitor and help Ss correct any
errors.

6

1
06

Listen

• Give Ss time to read through the sentences before they
listen to the recording.
• Play the recording, two or three times if necessary, for Ss
to listen and complete the sentences.
• Check Ss’ answers by asking individuals to read out the
sentences.

Teacher’s Notes

• Check Ss’ answers by asking two students to read aloud
the complete dialogue.
• After checking Ss’ answers, divide the class into two
groups (to be Speaker A and Speaker B). Ss listen and
say their lines in the dialogue after you and then change
parts.

Audio script
Rose:What are you going to do after school?
Lisa:I’m going to do my homework and then I’m
going to watch that Alex Rider film on TV. Why,
what are you going to do?
Rose:Well, some new Australian friends are coming
to our house. Their names are Ollie and Jess.
They’re really nice, I promise.
Lisa:What time are they arriving?
Rose:At six o’clock. Do you want to come? Jake’s got
a really cool Australian accent! We’re going to
play a computer game.
Lisa:Yes, OK. I’d love to meet them, but I’m going to
finish my History project first. I can come after
that.
Answers
2 she’s going to watch 3 are coming 4 are arriving
5 are going to play 6 is going to finish
1

7  07 SONG Dedicated Follower of
Fashion
• Ss turn to page 92. Read through the information about
The Kinks with the class.
• Play the recording for Ss to listen and read. Check
that Ss understand the new vocabulary. Explain that
Regent Street and Leicester Square are in London.
Carnabetian (army) refers to Carnaby Street, famous for
its trendsetting clothes shops in the 1960s.
• Play the recording again two or three times for Ss to
listen and join in.

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3

What did you do?

LESSON OBJECTIVES

structures

Past simple: positive, negative and questions

Functions

Ask and talk about things that happened in the past

Vocabulary

Free time (Memory check)
Everyday phrases: It was fun/rubbish. I nearly forgot.
Guess what [happened] … ! Please write back soon.
Thanks very much for the [CD].

Background information

• Bluewater Shopping Centre is in Kent in the
southeast of England. It opened in 1999 and has
over 330 shops, restaurants and a cinema.
• Limerick /'lImərIk/: a humorous 5-line rhyming
poem, usually with a surprising/funny last line.

2 Check
• Look at the example sentence and answer with the class.
Check that Ss understand that the sentences are not in the
email but they are what somebody said last weekend.
• Ss work individually or in pairs, referring to the
email and completing the chart. Go round and help if
necessary.
• Check answers by asking pairs of Ss to read out the
sentence and say the name of the person who said it.
Answers
2 Ollie 3 Rose 4 Alex 5 Mum 6 Rose

Everyday phrases
• Ask Ss to read through the phrases. Play the recording
from Exercise 1 for Ss to listen to the speaker’s
intonation and stress patterns when he says the phrases.
Ss then listen and say the phrases after you several times.
• Ask Ss what they say in their L1 for Guess what
happened and Please write back soon.

Getting started

Look and learn

• Ask Ss to look at the pictures of the children on page 8.
Encourage them to pool what they can remember about
each one (Jake, Rose, Ollie and Jess).
• Ask one of the Ss to read out the words on Rose’s arm.
Ask Ss (in L1) if they remember what happened in
Lesson 1 and to guess why these words are on Rose’s
arm. Ss can check their guesses in Exercise 1 in this
lesson.

• Read through the sentences with the class and elicit the
missing words. Check that Ss remember how to form the
negative and questions in the Past simple with did.
• Draw Ss’ attention to the phrases with ago. Ask Ss to say
the phrases after you.

1

1
08

Answers
Positive We talked
Negative He didn’t talk; We didn’t talk
Questions Where did they see him?

Read

• Give Ss time to look at Jake’s email to Sam. Draw Ss’
attention to the expressions used at the beginning and
end of the letter and the P.S. (postscript) for Jake’s
afterthought.
• Play the recording two or three times for Ss to listen and
read.
• Write on the board:
It was fun. It was rubbish. He was lucky.
Ask Ss to read the first paragraph of the email and to
guess the meaning of fun, rubbish and lucky. If you
wish, ask Ss to translate the sentences into their L1.
• Explain or encourage Ss to guess the meaning of any
other new words in the text.
• Play the recording of the second paragraph again, this
time leaving a pause after each sentence for Ss to listen
and repeat, chorally and individually.

3

1
09

Write and listen

a) Find the Past simple forms of these verbs in
Jake’s email. Then write them in the correct
column.
• Read out the instructions and the example verbs in the
two columns.
• Write the two columns on the board. Ask Ss to find the
next two verbs (have, be) in the email and ask individual
Ss to write the verb forms (have/had, be/was) on the
board in the correct column (irregular verbs).
• Ss work individually, finding the verbs in the email and
writing them in the correct column, in the Past simple
form.
• Check answers by asking individuals to write the verbs
in the columns on the board.

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Regular verbs start/started, arrive/arrived,
happen/happened, talk/talked, want/wanted
Irregular verbs have/had, be/was, go/went,
take/took, meet/met, make/made, buy/bought, leave/left,
find/found, forget/forgot, see/saw, come/came, say/said,
give/gave, think/thought, write/wrote

6 Memory check: Free time
• Read through the three headings with the class. Elicit one
or two more activities for each heading.
• Ss work in small groups of three of four, adding more
activities to each heading. If you wish, give Ss a time
limit of one minute.
• Write the three headings on the board. In turn, Ss from
each group add activities to the lists. Check spelling and
pronunciation of the vocabulary.

b) Now listen and repeat.
• Play the recording several times for Ss to listen and
repeat the verbs, chorally and individually.

Example answers
Things to do at home watch DVDs, read magazines
Things to do in town go to a café, go to the park
Sports play football, go cycling, play tennis

Audio script
Regular verbs start/started, arrive/arrived, happen/
happened, talk/talked, want/wanted
Irregular verbs do/did, have/had, be/was/were,
go/went, take/took, meet/met, make/made, buy/bought,
leave/left, find/found, forget/forgot, see/saw,
come/came, say/said, give/gave, think/thought,
write/wrote

4 Read and write
• Ask Ss to look at the picture. Ask Ss what the girl is
holding (British £10 notes) and encourage them to guess
why she has got this money. Teach the phrase cash
machine before Ss read the text.
• Ss work individually, reading and completing the article
with the Past simple of the verbs in brackets.
• Check Ss’ answers by asking individuals to read out
the sentences. Correct any serious pronunciation errors.
Check spelling where necessary. Explain or encourage Ss
to guess the meaning of any new vocabulary.
• Ask Ss if they think Lucy was crazy or if she did the
right thing.
Answers
2 wanted 3 went 4 took 5 started 6 gave 7 had
8 talked 9 was 10 said 11 did

5 Speak
• Ask two Ss to read aloud the example question and
answer. Look at the question prompts with the class and
elicit the questions.
• Ss then work in pairs, referring to Jake’s email and
taking turns to ask and answer the questions. Tell Ss
to answer in complete sentences. Monitor and help Ss
correct any errors.
• Check answers by asking pairs of Ss to ask and answer
the questions.
Answers
2 Who did they take? They took Ollie and Jess.
3 What did Jake buy? He bought a computer game.
4 What did Ollie leave in the shop? He left his mobile.
5 Which actor did they see? They saw Alex Pettyfer.
6 What did he give Rose? He gave her a photo.

7 Speak
a) Ask your friends what they did in their free time.
Ask about the times in the box.
• Read out the instructions and the times in the box.
Ask two Ss to read out the example dialogue. Elicit
questions and answers for all the time phrases in the box.
Encourage Ss to use some of the free time activities from
Exercise 6.
• Ss work in groups of three or four, taking turns to ask
and answer questions. Monitor but do not interrupt Ss’
fluency. Make a note of any general language problems
to go over with the class afterwards.

Teacher’s Notes

Answers

b) Tell the class.
• In turn, each S tells the class about their friends.

8 Write

Portfolio

• Read out the instructions and elicit several examples
from Ss of something funny or strange that happened
to them. Tell Ss they can invent something if they wish.
Encourage Ss to use vocabulary they already know in
English.
• Look at Jake’s email with the class. Draw Ss’ attention
to the beginning and ending of the email and how the
paragraphs are structured. Tell Ss that their email doesn’t
need to be as long as Jake’s.
• Ss draft their email first for you to check. Help with
vocabulary if necessary and point out any errors for Ss to
correct.
• When Ss have finished their email, they can work in
pairs or small groups, reading each other’s letters.

9

1
10

LIMERICK

• Ss turn to page 94. Use the picture to present the words
hot dog and log. Ss read through the gapped limerick and
try to guess the missing words.
• Play the recording for Ss to listen and complete.
• Check answers by asking individual Ss to write the
words on the board and say them.
• Play the recording again for Ss to listen and say the
limerick.
Answers
1 eat 2 hot dog 3 dropped 4 hot dog 5 street

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4

Across cultures

London

LESSON OBJECTIVES

structures — revision

Present simple, Present continuous, going to future,
Past simple
can (ability)
superlative: biggest, most popular

Vocabulary — new

apartment, bell, bend, destination, diameter, docks,
eastern, hemisphere, instead, marathon, mark (v),
offices, palace, prisoner, side, tower, tunnel, western

skills

• To read and understand factual information using
pictures, texts and a recording
• To listen for information about where the speaker
is
• To discuss interesting facts about London
• To read and understand a writing tip for ending a
letter or postcard
• To write a holiday postcard
• To develop an awareness of the world beyond Ss’
immediate environment

Background information

• The Houses of Parliament: also known as the Palace
of Westminster, containing the House of Commons,
the House of Lords and Westminster Hall. Big Ben
is the bell inside the clock tower. It weighs 13,760 kg
and was made in 1858.
• The London Eye: designed in the 1990s and opened
for the start of the Millennium. The London Eye
can carry 800 passengers in its 32 capsules. Each
rotation takes about 30 minutes (travelling at
0.9 km per hour) and passengers can step on and off
without the wheel having to stop. From the top of
the wheel, you can see around 40 km on a clear day.
• The Tower of London: three popular tourist
attractions at the Tower are the Crown Jewels (used
by the monarch on state occasions), the Yeomen
Warders (popularly known as Beefeaters) and the
permanent presence of the Tower Ravens (large
black birds in the crow family). Legend says that
if the ravens ever leave the Tower, the Tower, the
British monarchy and British kingdom will fall.
• Tower Bridge: when Tower Bridge was built
(1886–1894), London’s docks were still in use, so
the bridge had to allow access for tall-masted ships.
The Bridge consists of two towers (each 60.96 m
tall) and a bridge which can split into two.

Background information (contd)

• Greenwich /'renItS, 'rI-, -nIdZ/: the Prime
Meridian (zero degrees longitude) runs through
the Royal Observatory at Greenwich. The National
Maritime Museum at Greenwich is a World
Heritage Site, along with the Tower of London and
the Palace of Westminster.
• Canary Wharf /kə"neəri 'wO:f/: London’s newest
business and banking district. It is called Canary
Wharf because, when there were docks there, many
of the imports came from the Canary Islands. The
tallest building in London is the Canary Wharf
Tower.

Getting started
• Introduce the topic of ‘London’. Ask Ss to say what
they know about London, e.g. famous buildings, streets,
tourist attractions. If you have a large London map,
postcards and pictures of London, bring them to the
lesson and encourage Ss to talk about them, using
English as much as possible. If appropriate, introduce
some of the vocabulary from the lesson at this stage.
• Ask Ss to look at the photos then name the places and
say what they know about them (using English as much
as possible).

1

1
11

Listen and read

• Ask Ss to look at the photos and read the ‘Amazing facts
and figures’. Ask if they know/can guess the places in the
photos.
• Play the recording several times for Ss to listen and read.
Ss can check if their guesses about the places in the
photos were correct. You may like to pause the recording
after each section and ask a question to check Ss’
comprehension, e.g.
Text 1: Is Big Ben a clock or a bell? (a bell).
Text 2: Is the London Eye a tower or a wheel? (a wheel).
Text 3: Is the Tower of London a museum or a palace
today? (a museum).
Text 4: Is Tower Bridge one of the newest or one of the
oldest bridges in London? (one of the newest).
Text 5: Is the line at Greenwich important because of
time or because of the weather? (time).
Text 6: Are the offices in Canary Wharf old or new?
(new).
Further practice
• Write some of the numbers from the texts on the board
for Ss to practise reading aloud.
numbers
1,100
350,000
percentages
30%
years
1078
1894
metres
135 m
7.5 m
degrees
0° longitude

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