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Grammar sense additional materials

Additional materials to help support
your teaching.
Teaching Techniques
Read experts' tips for teaching grammar in your classroom and
for using Grammar Sense with your students.

Tests and Answer Keys
Photocopiable chapter tests to use with your class.
Answer Keys are also provided.

Tapescripts
Student Book Answer Keys
The complete answer keys for Student Books 1, 2 and 3.


Presenting the Form Sections in Grammar Sense
EXAMINING FORM EXERCISES
One of the most challenging aspects of teaching grammar is finding clear and concise ways
to present new forms to students. The Examining Form exercise in each chapter is a series
of inductive tasks in which students work on identifying the target structure and its most
important structural features. In these exercises, students are asked to return to the reading

text in the Grammar in Discourse section of the chapter, and follow the steps to recognize
or systematically analyze key aspects of the form (such as the number of different parts in
a structure, the addition of suffixes, word order, agreement, and so on). This serves as an
introduction to the structural features illustrated and explained in the Form Charts, which
students may then consult to check their answers.
FORM CHARTS
In chapters with particularly challenging structures, you may need to help students work
through and internalize the information in the Form Charts before they start on the form
exercises. The following is a compilation of some of the most successful techniques for
guiding students through this section. Choose appropriate techniques based on your teaching
style, class size, class level, and students’ previous experience with the grammar point. Most
importantly, vary the techniques you use to accommodate the different learning styles of your
students—some students may prefer to read and discuss every example in the chart before
moving on to the exercises, while others may need to study the material less intensively.
Whole Class Techniques
1. After students have finished the Examining Form exercise, ask them to close their books.
Elicit examples of the target grammar from the reading text by asking questions that will
produce the target grammar. When possible, personalize your questions. For example, to
elicit possessive pronouns, hold up a book and ask, Whose book is this? with the aim of
eliciting responses such as It’s his. It’s mine. When students answer, write their responses
on the board. If a student gives an incorrect response (e.g., It is her.), you should still write
it on the board. Incorrect answers are as valuable as correct ones, because they can be used
to focus students’ attention on the structure. Likewise, if a student answers correctly but
uses a different structure than the one you wish to focus on (e.g., It’s her book.), write this
answer on the board and ask if anyone knows an alternative response (e.g., It’s hers.). Write
students’ responses on the board, then have them open their books to the Form Charts and
find sentences that use the same structures as those on the board.

2. To focus more closely on the various parts of a structure, copy the chart headings onto
the board, or construct other types of contrastive charts (e.g., -s/-es/-ies, or singular/plural,
etc.). Elicit examples from the reading text to illustrate each point, or ask students to create
their own examples. Have individual students come to the board and fill in the charts. Then
ask the rest of the class to decide if their examples are correct or not, and to explain why.
3. After students have finished the Examining Form exercise, ask them to silently review
the Form Charts for a few minutes. Assess their understanding of the charts by asking
questions about the form. For example, for Yes/No questions in the present tense, you
might ask Where is the subject? What word does the question begin with? How many Yes/No
question forms are there? In this way, you will be able to judge whether students have fully
understood the form of the target grammar.
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Presenting the Form Sections in Grammar Sense

© Oxford University Press


Pair or Group Work Techniques
1. Divide students into pairs or small groups. Assign each group a Form Chart and ask
them to read and study the information. Then ask each group in turn to present the form
in their chart to the rest of the class. Students can use their own example sentences to aid
their presentation, in addition to those provided in the book.

2. Divide students into pairs or small groups. Write two correct sentences and one incorrect
sentence on the board. (Make sure the error is one of form, not meaning and use.) Tell
students that one sentence is incorrect. Ask them to work together to identify the incorrect
sentence by looking at the Form Charts. Some students may know the answer without
using the charts, but ask them to point to the information or example in the chart that
shows why it is incorrect. This insures that they know how to interpret the charts.

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Presenting the Form Sections in Grammar Sense

© Oxford University Press


Presenting the Meaning and Use Sections in Grammar Sense
EXAMINING MEANING AND USE EXERCISES
Once students have grasped the form of a given structure, the next challenge is to find creative
and engaging ways to help them understand the meaning and use. The Examining Meaning
and Use exercises do just this by offering carefully constructed examples, often in the form of
minimal pairs, and asking students to use contextual cues to draw inferences about key aspects
of meaning and use. These inductive tasks serve as an introduction to the features of meaning
and use that are further elucidated in the Notes that follow.
MEANING AND USE NOTES
Students need to read and absorb the Meaning and Use Notes before starting the exercises.
What follows are some techniques for helping students work through the Meaning and
Use Notes. Regardless of the technique you choose, it is important that you have a clear
understanding of the scope of the Meaning and Use Notes before you present them. In
some instances, a particular structure may have multiple meanings and uses, but the
chapter will not address all of them. In Levels 1 and 2, certain meanings and uses of
structures are omitted to avoid overwhelming the students with too much information,
while in Level 3, basic meanings and uses may be de-emphasized in order to focus on
more complex issues.
Whole Class Techniques
1. Give students an opportunity to read and ask questions about the Meaning and Use Notes.
Check their understanding by writing several original sentences on the board and asking
them to match the meaning and use in each sentence to the Meaning and Use Notes. With
more advanced students you can include a few incorrect sentences among the examples and
have students identify correct and incorrect meanings and uses. Before you do this, be sure
you have a firm grasp of the meaning and use you are focusing on so you can clearly
explain why the examples you provided are correct or incorrect.

2. If there are several Meaning and Use Notes, or if you think students will find the content
challenging, have them read and demonstrate their understanding of one Note at a time.
Once they have read the Note, elicit sentences that demonstrate the meaning and use of
the Note they just read. For example, to elicit sentences with used to when talking about a
situation that was true in the past but is not true now (Student Book 2, page 65, Note 1A),
have students talk about something they did when they were younger but don’t do today.
This should elicit sentences such as I used to eat a lot of candy. I used to play baseball every
summer.
Pair or Group Work Techniques
1. Divide students into pairs or small groups. Assign each pair or group a Note and ask
students to study it. Then ask each pair or group to present their Note to the rest of the
class. Students can create their own example sentences to aid their presentation, in addition
to those provided in the book. Again, be sure you fully understand the meaning and use in
question so you can tell students whether their examples are correct or incorrect and, most
importantly, why they are correct or incorrect.

1

Presenting the Meaning and Use Sections in Grammar Sense

© Oxford University Press


2. Divide students into pairs or small groups. Have each pair or group read one Note and
create two example sentences to illustrate the information presented in the Note. Ask
each pair or group to come to the front of the class to explain the Note and write their
example sentences on the board. Ask the class if the sentences are correct examples of
the information in the Note. If not, call on individual students to suggest alternate
correct sentences.

2

Presenting the Meaning and Use Sections in Grammar Sense

© Oxford University Press


General Teaching Techniques for the Grammar Classroom
Grammar Sense contains a wealth of exercises covering all four skills areas: reading,
writing, listening, and speaking. Depending on your students, curriculum, and time
frame, these exercises can be taught in many ways. Successful grammar teaching requires
skillful classroom management and teaching techniques, especially in the areas of elicitation
(drawing information from students), grouping procedures (groups, pairs, or individuals),
time management (lengthening or shortening exercises), and error correction (peer or
teacher correction, correction of spoken or written errors).
ELICITATION

Elicitation is one of the most useful teaching techniques in the grammar classroom. In
essence, elicitation draws information out of the students through the use of leading
questions. This helps students to discover, on their own, information about grammar
forms as well as meanings and uses. For example, to elicit the difference in meaning
between a gerund and an infinitive when used after the verb stop, write the following
sentences on the board: Alan stopped to smoke. Alan stopped smoking. Then, in order to
elicit the difference in meaning between the two sentences, ask questions such as, In which
sentence are we talking about a smoker? Which sentence is about a reformed (or ex-) smoker?
These questions require students to analyze what they know about the grammar and make
inferences about meaning.
Knowing when to elicit information can be difficult. Too much elicitation can slow the class
and too little elicitation puts students in a passive position. Avoid asking students to judge
whether something sounds natural or acceptable to them because, as non-native speakers,
they will not have the same intuitions about English as native speakers.
GROUPING STUDENTS

Group work is a valuable part of language learning. It takes away the focus from the teacher as
the provider of information and centers on the students, giving them the opportunity to work
together and rely on each other for language acquisition. Shyer students who may be less likely
to speak out in class have an opportunity to share answers or ideas. Your class level will inform
how you approach group work. Be sure to circulate among groups to monitor the progress of
an activity, particularly at lower levels, and to answer any questions students cannot resolve
on their own. Although students at the higher levels are more independent and can often
manage their own groups, be attentive to the activities at hand, ready to offer feedback
and keep everyone on-task. In classes where the level of students is uneven, try varying
the composition of the groups to make the learning process interesting for everybody.
Sometimes you can pair up a higher-level student with a lower-level student to give him
or her an opportunity to help another classmate. However, other times you may want to
group all the higher-level students together and offer them additional, more challenging
activities. It is useful, especially in discussion activities, to conclude with a culminating task
in which one or more students report back something (results, a summary) to the rest of the
class using the target structure. This helps to refocus the class on the structure and provide a
conclusion to the activity.

1

General Teaching Techniques for the Grammar Classroom

© Oxford University Press


TIME MANAGEMENT

Some exercises are divided into steps, making it possible to shorten an activity by assigning
part of it for homework or by dividing the class into two groups and assigning half the items
to each group. Similarly, exercises can be lengthened. Many of the exercises in Grammar
Sense require students to ask for or offer real-life information. You can ask students to create
additional sentences within these activities, or have them do an activity again with a different
partner. If your class does an activity well, ask them to focus on other aspects of the form,
for example, transforming their affirmative sentences into negative ones, and vice-versa.
CHECKING EXERCISES

How you check exercises with students will depend on the level you are teaching. Having
students check their answers in pairs or groups can be an effective technique, because it
makes students revisit their work and resolve with other students the mistakes they have
made. With lower levels, this requires careful teacher supervision. It is also possible at all
levels to check exercises as a class, elicit corrections from students, and offer necessary
feedback. It is often useful, especially for correcting editing exercises, to use an overhead
projector. Be careful not to single out students when correcting work. Aim instead to
create a supportive atmosphere whereby the class learns through a group effort.
CORRECTING ERRORS

Students can often communicate effectively without perfect grammar. However, in order to
succeed in higher education or the business world, they need to demonstrate a high level of
grammatical accuracy, and to understand that even a small change in form can sometimes
result in a significant change in meaning. As students become aware of this, they expect to
be corrected. However, their expectations as to how and when correction should be offered
will vary. Many teachers have difficulty finding the optimal amount of correction—enough
to focus students on monitoring errors, but not so much as to demoralize or discourage
them. It is important to target specific types of errors when correcting students, rather
than aiming to correct everything they say or write. The focus of the current lesson and
your knowledge of your students’ strengths and weaknesses will dictate whether you focus
on form, pronunciation, meaning, or appropriate use. Discuss error correction with your
students and determine how they would like to be corrected. Aim to combine or vary your
correction techniques depending on the focus of the lesson and the needs of your students.
Spoken Errors
There are a variety of ways to correct spoken errors. If a student makes an error repeatedly,
stop him or her and encourage self-correction by repeating the error with a questioning
(rising) tone, or by gesturing. Develop a set of gestures that you use consistently so students
know exactly what you are pointing out. For example, problems with the past tense can
be indicated by pointing backwards over your shoulder, future time can be indicated by
pointing your hand ahead of you, and third person can be shown by holding up three
fingers. (Be careful not to choose gestures that are considered offensive by some cultures.)
If your students feel comfortable being corrected by their peers, encourage them to help
each other when they hear mistakes. Another option is to keep track of spoken errors
during an activity, and then at the end elicit corrections from the class by writing the
incorrect sentences you heard on the board. This way, students are not singled out for
their mistakes, but get the feedback they need.

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General Teaching Techniques for the Grammar Classroom

© Oxford University Press


Written Errors
It is important to encourage students to monitor their written errors and learn strategies to
self-correct their writing. Establish a standard set of symbols to use when marking students’
work. For example, pl for plural, agr for agreement, s for subject, v for verb. When you find an
error, do not correct it, but instead mark it with a symbol. Students will have to work out the
exact nature of their error and correct it themselves. This will reduce your correction time
and encourage students to learn for themselves by reflecting on their errors. Peer correction
is another useful technique by which students can provide feedback on a partner’s work. In
order for it to be effective, give students clear and limited objectives and do not expect them
to identify all the errors in their classmate’s work. Note that students may be resistant to peer
correction at first, and nervous about learning others’ mistakes. But once they develop a trust
in one another, they will be surprised at how much they can learn from their classmates.

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General Teaching Techniques for the Grammar Classroom

© Oxford University Press


Grammar Sense
Tests and answer keys.
There is one test for every chapter in the Student Books. Tests and corresponding
answer keys are available in PDF format.

• Grammar Sense 1
• Grammar Sense 2
• Grammar Sense 3


Grammar Sense Tests: An Introduction
What is the Grammar Sense testing package?

The Grammar Sense testing package is a collection of chapter tests and milestone tests.

• The chapter tests are 20-question tests designed for use as a diagnostic tool or to assess

achievement. Each chapter test is followed by a brief note to the student, called Looking
Ahead to the TOEFL® Test, in which students are shown how a particular grammatical
structure covered in the corresponding Grammar Sense chapter might be tested on the
TOEFL® test.

• The milestone tests are 40-question tests designed to assess student achievement at

milestones throughout the course. These tests may be used as midterm tests halfway
through each book, or as finals at the end of the course.

• Each test covers the basic points of form, meaning, and use that are presented in the

corresponding book. The form and content of the questions are written in the style of
the TOEFL® questions that are appropriate to each of the three levels of Grammar Sense.

Why is testing important?

A grammar test, like any classroom test, is a systematic way for students and teachers to obtain
feedback about the teaching and learning processes. It is one tool among many that teachers
use to gain insight into the strengths and weaknesses of their students’ mastery of the material
and of their own teaching.
Some teachers will use chapter tests as pre-tests for diagnostic purposes. Others may use them
as post-tests to assess achievement.
What is the difference between a diagnostic test and an achievement test?

A diagnostic test may be administered before teaching a chapter, to assess what students
already know. The teacher may then use the results of the diagnostic test to decide, for
example, which parts of the chapter to focus on, or how much time to dedicate to practice
activities.
An achievement test, on the other hand, is administered after students have been exposed to
a particular part of a syllabus. As a way of reinforcing progress and discovering areas that need
further work, an achievement test can add a valuable dimension to the grammar classroom.
How should the tests be administered?

In order to access a particular test, click on the Tests link on the Grammar Sense homepage,
click on the relevant level, and then choose the test from the menu. By clicking on the test
number, you will be able to download a photocopiable PDF file of the test and the answer
key. You will need Adobe® Acrobat Reader® to open the file. Copy the test as needed.
Teachers should set a time limit of about 15 or 20 minutes for completing a test.
How should the tests be corrected?

Time constraints, class dynamics, and teaching and learning styles may influence whether
the tests are corrected by the teacher or by the students as a class activity.

1

Grammar Sense Tests: An Introduction

© Oxford University Press


• Teacher Correction. After correcting the papers and returning them to the students, go over
the correct answers and any problems with the class. This may be a good opportunity for
focusing on problem areas that the test results have isolated.

• Student Correction. Ask students to exchange papers with a partner. Then elicit the correct
answer to each question from the class. Instruct students to mark correct answers with a
check (✓) and incorrect answers with a ✘. After the tests are corrected, return them to their
original owners for review and further questions. Then collect the tests in order to evaluate
the results.
This technique has the advantage of providing immediate feedback as students make
corrections, ask questions, and seek clarification during the correction process.
What should be done with the test results?

Used diagnostically, the chapter test results will inform the teacher about how much to
present and in what order. They will also help to determine the focus of a lesson, as well
as the teaching style.
When used to measure achievement, the results of Grammar Sense tests can be used to help
assess the mastery of specific aspects of form, meaning and use. They can also provide
feedback to the student and teacher about what works, what doesn’t, and what still needs
to be done. Results may indicate the need for more self-study or the need for a different
approach, style, or focus in teaching the material.
What do the test results tell me about my students?

Teachers may notice that the language learning process is often characterized by unstable
behavior. That is, a student may use a structure accurately in class, but subsequently forget
it on the test; or the student may use the structure accurately on the test, but may later be
unable to produce it in a classroom activity. It is therefore important to maintain realistic
expectations about grammar learning; much of what we do in a grammar class is to work
toward more consistent and accurate use of grammatical structures.
Teachers and students need to understand that the Grammar Sense testing package is one tool
in the arsenal of techniques, exercises, and activities that are provided in Grammar Sense to
reinforce more accurate and meaningful use of the language. The test results should therefore
be considered in the broader context of language learning. By using all the resources in
Grammar Sense to evaluate students through reading, writing, speaking, and listening in
longer discourse as well as in shorter contexts, we can obtain a more accurate assessment of
a student’s achievement.

2

Grammar Sense Tests: An Introduction

© Oxford University Press


CHAPTER TEST

3

Imperatives

PART I. Choose the best answer to complete each sentence.
1. The meeting is at 5:00. Don’t
a. lose
b. be
c. make
2. I’m thirsty.
a. Get
b. Help
c. Drink
3.

late.

me some water, please.

6.

the change.

Greg Smith for me, please.
a. Call
b. Listen
c. Talk

this letter to the mailroom.

7.

a cup of water into a pan.
a. Boil
b. Cook
c. Put

a. Go
b. Take
c. Find
4. This is a hospital. Don’t
a. smoke
b. forget
c. work

5. Here’s ten dollars.
a. Look
b. Keep
c. Buy

here.

PART II. Find the error in each sentence and correct it.
8. Turns left at the corner.
9. Not take the first exit.
10. No swallow this.
11. Are careful! The traffic is bad.
12. Underlines the verb in each sentence.
13. Please not make copies.
14. Stays here.

1

Grammar Sense 1 Test: Chapter 3

© Oxford University Press


PART III. Choose the best answer to complete each conversation.
18. A: The soup is ready.

15. A: It’s cold today.

B: Good.
a. Boil it.
b. Serve it.

B: Yes.
a. Don’t take your coat.
b. Don’t forget your coat.

19. A: Where is the post office?

16. A: Please copy this contract.

B:

B:

a. Walk straight on Elm Street. It’s on the right.
b. No, it isn’t. It’s on Third Street.

a. Where’s the contract?
b. Where’s the copier?
17. A: Oh, no! I’m late for the meeting.
B:

The meeting is tomorrow.
a. Don’t worry.
b. Leave now!

Total

20. A: What’s the homework?
B:
a. Read Chapter four.
b. Close your books.

20

Thinking Ahead to the TOEFL® Test
Imperatives are often tested in the Structure section of the TOEFL® test. Here is a typical example:
After a hurricane, not touch fallen or low-hanging wires and be careful around weakened trees
A

B

C

and other damaged structures.
D

2

Grammar Sense 1 Test: Chapter 3

© Oxford University Press


CHAPTER TEST

3

Answer Key

PART I
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

b
a
b
a
b
a
c

PART II
Turn

8. Turns left at the corner.

Don’t

9. Not take the first exit.

Don’t

10. No swallow this.

Be

11. Are careful! The traffic is bad.

Underline

12. Underlines the verb in each sentence.

do

13. Please not make copies.

Stay

14. Stays here.

PART III
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

3

b
b
a
b
a
a

Grammar Sense 1 Answer Key: Chapter 3

© Oxford University Press


CHAPTER TEST

1

Simple Present Statements with Be

PART I. Choose the best answer to complete each sentence.
1. Lisa and I
a. am
b. is
c. are
2. This is Pete.
a. I’m
b. He’s
c. They’re

teachers.

a new employee.

3. Jorge is from Mexico. He
Rico.
a. isn’t
b. is
c. aren’t
4. The new video games
a. they’re
b. are
c. it’s

from Puerto

5. Electro Design is a small company.
large.
a. He
b. It
c. They
6. Hello. My name
a. am
b. are
c. is
7. Sara and I are in school.
a. We
b. You
c. They

isn’t

Soo-jin.

are students.

fun!

PART II. Find the error in each sentence and correct it.
8. You not happy.
9. The students is at school.
10. My name amn’t Diego.
11. Brad, this Carol.
12. We no are from Mexico City.
13. They are a new companies.
14. Oh, it 3:00. We’re late!
15. Bob and Steve isn’t Canadian.

1

Grammar Sense 1 Test: Chapter 1

© Oxford University Press


PART III. Choose the best answer to complete each conversation.
19. A: Fumiko is from Japan.

16. A: Jenny, this is Alex.

B: Yes,
a. she’s from Hokkaido.
b. she’s tall.
c. she’s a student.

B:
a. I’m Jenny.
b. He’s 21.
c. Hi, Alex.

20. A: The weather is terrible!

17. A: My name is Corey.

B: Yes,
a. it’s Thursday.
b. it’s cold and rainy.
c. we’re late!

B:
a. Thank you.
b. I’m Mark.
c. I’m from California.
18. A: I’m in college.
B: Really?
, too.
a. I’m an employee
b. I’m a student
c. I’m from Taiwan
Total

20

Thinking Ahead to the TOEFL® Test
Simple present statements with be are often tested in the Structure section of the TOEFL® test.
Here is a typical example:
The short hair of some dogs, such as Labrador retrievers, are important for repelling water and
A

B

C

keeping warm in icy water.
D

2

Grammar Sense 1 Test: Chapter 1

© Oxford University Press


CHAPTER TEST

1

Answer Key

PART I
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

c
b
a
b
b
c
a

PART II
You’re

8. You not happy.

are

9. The students is at school.

isn’t

10. My name amn’t Diego.

is

11. Brad, this Carol.

aren’t

12. We no are from Mexico City.
13. They are a new companies.

it’s

14. Oh, it 3:00. We’re late!

aren’t

15. Bob and Steve isn’t Canadian.

PART III
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

3

c
b
b
a
b

Grammar Sense 1 Answer Key: Chapter 1

© Oxford University Press


CHAPTER TEST

2

Questions with Be

PART I. Choose the best answer to complete each sentence.
1.

late?
a. He is
b. Am I
c. We are

4.

is Stefan from?
a. Who
b. Where
c. What

2.

in the United States?
a. Where your family
b. Is your family
c. Your family

5.

your business class difficult?
a. Is it
b. How is
c. Is

3.

your grades?
a. How are
b. Are
c. Are good

6. Who is
?
a. the test
b. the children
c. the teacher

PART II. Find the error in each sentence and correct it.
7. How your roommate is?
8. Where my magazine?
9. You and Bill employees here?
10. No, it no is.
11. Who is they?
12. Is athletic your best friend?

1

Grammar Sense 1 Test: Chapter 2

© Oxford University Press


PART III. Choose the best answer to complete each conversation.
13. A: Are your friends busy?

17. A: Are you students?
B:

B:

a. Yes, they are.
b. Yes, we are.
c. No, I’m not.

a. Yes, they are.
b. No, it isn’t.
c. Yes, he is.
18. A:

14. A:
B: Fine, thanks.
a. Who is he?
b. Where am I?
c. How are you?
15. A: Where is the apartment?
B:
a. It’s cheap.
b. It’s large.
c. It’s on the third floor.

19. A:
B: No, you aren’t.
a. Where are we?
b. Are we late?
c. Who are you?
20. A:

16. A:
B: Yes, he is.
a. Is Mr. Chang the manager?
b. Who is the manager?
c. Where is the manager?
Total

B: At 12:00.
a. How is lunch?
b. Where is lunch?
c. When is lunch?

B: Pete Johnson.
a. How is Pete?
b. Who are they?
c. What’s your name?

20

Thinking Ahead to the TOEFL® Test
Questions with be are often tested in the Structure section of the TOEFL® test. Here is a typical
example:
a social science, a part of humanities, or a combination of disciplines?
A. Is it linguistics
B. Is linguistics
C. Linguistics
D. Does linguistics

2

Grammar Sense 1 Test: Chapter 2

© Oxford University Press


CHAPTER TEST

2

Answer Key

PART I
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

b
b
a
b
c
c

PART II
7. How your roommate is ?

is

8. Where my magazine?

Are you

9. You and Bill employees here?

isn’t

10. No, it no is.

are

11. Who is they?
12. Is athletic your best friend?

PART III
13. a
14. c
15. c
16. a
17. b
18. c
19. b
20. c

3

Grammar Sense 1 Answer Key: Chapter 2

© Oxford University Press


CHAPTER TEST

4

Introduction to Nouns

PART I. Choose the best answer to complete each sentence.
1. Baltimore is
a. a
b. an
c.
2.

city in Maryland.

are cheap in this neighborhood.
a. Apartment
b. An apartment
c. Apartments

3. Betty is a librarian at
a. a
b. an
c.
4. Where is
a. a
b.
c. the

university.

5.

isn’t for sale.
a. The sofa
b. Sofa
c. Sofas

6. Call
a. a
b. an
c.

electrician, please.

7. Are the
here?
a. employee
b. an employee
c. employees

Paul?

PART II. Find the error in each sentence and correct it.
8. An utility truck is outside.
9. Your children is beautiful.
10. Juan and Rosa are in a Chicago.
11. Take elevator to the fourth floor.
12. My foots are large.
13. Are the utility expensive?
14. Give me a forks, please.

1

Grammar Sense 1 Test: Chapter 4

© Oxford University Press


PART III. Choose the best answer to complete each conversation.
18. A: Are the people friendly?

15. A: Are the women doctors?

B:

B: No.
a. She’s a nurse.
b. They’re nurses.

a. Yes, it is.
b. Yes, they are.
19. A: How are the children?

16. A: Where is your room?

B:

B:

a. They’re fine.
b. It’s fine.

a. It’s in the dorm.
b. They’re near campus.

20. A: Is an herb a vegetable?

17. A: Is Detroit close to Chicago?

B:

B:

a. No, it isn’t.
b. No, they aren’t.

a. Yes, they are.
b. No, it’s five hours away.
Total

20

Thinking Ahead to the TOEFL® Test
Nouns are often tested in the Structure section of the TOEFL® test. Here is a typical example:
Peregrine falcons are bird of prey that are known for their extremely high speed.
A

2

B

Grammar Sense 1 Test: Chapter 4

C

D

© Oxford University Press


CHAPTER TEST

4

Answer Key

PART I
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

a
c
a
b
a
b
c

PART II
A

8. An utility truck is outside.

are

9. Your children is beautiful.
10. Juan and Rosa are in a Chicago.

an/the

11. Take elevator to the fourth floor.

feet
utilities

12. My foots are large.
13. Are the utility expensive?

fork

14. Give me a forks, please.

PART III
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

3

b
a
b
b
a
a

Grammar Sense 1 Answer Key: Chapter 4

© Oxford University Press


CHAPTER TEST

5

Introduction to Count and Noncount Nouns

PART I. Choose the best answer to complete each sentence.
1. Recycle cans and
a. a
b. the
c.
2.

paper.

are my favorite fruit.
a. Apple
b. An apple
c. Apples

3. Turn off
a. a
b. the
c.

lights, please.

4. China is
a. a
b. the
c.
5. The
a. news
b. books
c. movies

big country.

is not interesting.

6. The boxes are in
a. an
b. the
c.

garage.

PART II. Find the error in each sentence and correct it.
7. A soccer is a popular sport.
8. Donate old furnitures.
9. The people is in the bank.
10. The music are beautiful.
11. Don’t buy an expensive jewelry.
12. Reduce a pollution.
13. Look up the informations.
14. A chicken is a delicious meat.

1

Grammar Sense 1 Test: Chapter 5

© Oxford University Press


PART III. Choose the best answer to complete each conversation.
15. A: Look at the clothes in the window!

18. A: Two

B. Yes.
a. They’re beautiful.
b. It’s beautiful.

B: Right away, sir.
a. coffees
b. coffee

16. A: Where’s the money?

19. A: Don’t drive your car in the city.

B:

B: OK. Are
cheap?
a. public transportation
b. busses

a. They’re in the bank.
b. It’s at home.
17. A: Take a class in economics.

20. A: Is this your luggage?

B:

B:
a. No. It’s boring.
b. All right. They’re interesting.

Total

please.

a. Yes, it is.
b. No, they aren’t.

20

Thinking Ahead to the TOEFL® Test
Count and noncount nouns are often tested in the Structure section of the TOEFL® test. Here is a
typical example:
Environmentalists discourage the purchase of teakwood furnitures because it is a product of the
A

B

C

D

tropical rain forest.

2

Grammar Sense 1 Test: Chapter 5

© Oxford University Press


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