Tải bản đầy đủ

New matrix intermediate student book

0 0 . 0
Student's Book
Kathy Gude
with Jayne Wildman

OXFORD


New

Intermediate

Student's Book
Kathy Gude
with Jayne Wildman

OXFORD
UNIVERSITY PRESS


Contents

7 .A senseo,identity

Reading and Vocabulary

Grammar

Who are the British?
V: Describing characteristics
Phrasa l verbs - bring in, build up, make up,

Present simple and present continuous,
Stative verbs

Present simple and present continuous
Extension : See hear, feel, taste and smell;
Adverbs of freq uency

put in, put up with
Exam training: Matching headi ngs
R: Matchi ng head ings
Page 4

4

6

8

Z 7n the Inind"s eye

Brain power
V: The brain and perception
Exam training: Skim read ing
Exam training: Multiple choice
R: Mu ltiple choice

Modal verbs: abi lity, permission, obligation
and recommendation
Modals in the past


Can, have to, may, must, and should
Extension : Ought to, need to

Page 16

16

18

20

Ups and downs of the human race

The past: narrative tenses:
Past simple, past continuous, past perfect

Past simple, past continuous,
Past perfect
Extension : As, when, while

3 Tilnespost

V: Describi ng people, Survival, Prepositions
Exam training: Scann ing, Summarising
R: Matching
Page 30

30

32

34

4 "IIVhot lies oheod

Jobs in the future
V: Describing growth, Prepositions,
Descri bing abilities
Exam training: Missing sentences
R: Missi ng sentences

The futu re: Present conti nuous, will, going to
Present simple

The future: Present conti nuous, will, going to
and present si mp le
Extension : Other uses of will, when as soon as,
before and after

Page 42

42

44

46

S FOlneond,oTtune

Fame and the family
V: Fame

Modal verbs: logical conclusions
Logical conclusions in the past

Moda l verbs: logical concl usions
Logical concl usions in the past
Extension Because, unless, although

56

58

60

& 7'1feons
cOlnlnunicotion

Body language
V: Body language
Exam training: Describi ng pictures
R: Matching

Present perfect
Present perfect simple and present perfect
continuous

Present perfect
Present perfect si mple and present perfect conti nuous
Extension : Already, still, yet

Page 68

68

70

72

7' Slnoll beginnings

New York
V: Population
R: Missing sentences

The passive

The passive
Extension : The passive with by, of, with

Page 56

0'

Page 82

82

84

86

B TokingTisks

Measuring the risks
V: Possibility, result and chance
Articles

Relative clauses
Defin ing and non-d efi ning clauses

Defi ning relative clauses
Non-defini ng clauses
Extension: Where, when

Page 94

94

96

98

Into the wild
V: Wild life
Phrasal verbs: weor off, wake up, settle in,

First and second conditional, Wishes

First and second conditional , wishes
Extension : Would rather, would prefer to, prefer

108

110

112

Running out of time
V: Ways of life
Ph rasa l verbs: end up, look after, play on,

Reported speech
Reported statements
Reporting requests and demands

Reported speech
Extension: Suggest and recommend

bring about, come round
108

70 The right choice __ _

pull out, take part


;


I~,stening and Speaking

Writing

, Culture Zone /
Reading for pleasure

1&.
Psychometric tests
L: ~n announcement A talk
Exam training: True I False
F: Saying what you think, Inviting people
to speak
Exa m training: Role plays
S: Role play - finding out about a job
10

Writing a letter about yourself
Computer penfriends: Descriptions
Exam training: Avoiding repetition

Who are the British 7
Phrasal verbs: bring in, build up, make up,

12

14

15

Identity parade
L: -\ telephone conversation
Exa m training: True or fa lse
Exam training: Identifying statements
L: Identifyi ng statements
F: -\ski ng/ explaining what something means
S: Role play - explaining a theft
21

Writing a letter giving advice
A home-stay visit: Giving advice

Brain Power
Crime
Phrasal verbs: put up, make up, set off, find out,

R: A New Sport
from joy Luck Club
by Amy Tan

Reliving the past
L: A ta lk
f : \1a king comparisons
L: Orderi ng events
S: Photo discussion
36

Writing a description
Great wal ls: A description of place

C: Different perspectives on the EU

put in, put up with
Jobs
Word build ing
Adjectives

drop off
Prepositions

26

Ups and downs of the hu ma n race
Confusing words
Phrasa l verbs: put off, take up, put up with,

C: A parliamentary monarchy

let (sb) down, fall through
38

40

41

23rd Century Twins
L: A rad io programme
Exa m training: Matching information
F: Talking about the futu re
S: Photo discussion
Song: Imagine
-!8

Writing a formal letter of complaint
Tomorrow's classroom: Formal and informal
language

Jobs in the future
Talking about the future
Prepositions
Phrasal verbs: bring about, come up against,

R: Five-car family

50

52

53

~tak ing changes
L: A talk
Exam training: Multiple choice
F: Persuadi ng someone
S: Role play - planning a weekend
S: Photo discussion
62

Writing an argument for and against
Ambition: style
Exam training: Plann ing a com position

Fame and the fami ly
Prepositions
Expressions
Phrasa l verbs: hang on to, put off, carry on,

C: Music 21st century style

by Roger McGough

count on, be up to, work out

work out, go without
64

66

67

'arieties of English
L: Radio programme
F: Giving opinions
S: A class debate
So ng: Wordy roppinghood
-4

Writing a letter of enquiry
Mobile phones: Forma l and informal vocabu lary

Body language
Varieties of Engl ish
Adjectives
Phrasal verbs: tryout, keep up, look for,

R: The Judge's house
by Bram Stoker

76

78

79

Inventing tomorrow
L: A talk
A rad io interview
F: Conversation fillers
S: Role play - making enquiries
Song: You con get it if you really want
88

Travel writer of the year
Writing a story: Orderi ng pa ra graphs and events

New York
Confusing words
Uses of get
Phrasa l verbs: come up with, set up, make up,

C: Spending habits and lifestyles

find out, fill in

keep up with, grow up
90

92

93

Emergency fitness
L: A telephone conversation
F: Givi ng reasons
S: Photo discussion
Song: Nobody does it better
100

Writing a message and an informal letter

Measuri ng the risks
Prepositions
Descri bing risk
Phrasal verbs: put (sb) through, hang up,

R: The London Road
from When I walked out one summer morning
by Laurie Lee

102

104

105

If you were in their shoes ...
L: A TV programme
F: Suggesting alternatives
S: Photo discussion
Song: Our house
11 4

Writing a discursive composition
I wish ... : Expressing personal opi nions

Into the wild
Phrasal verbs: bring in, come round, settle in

C: Notting Hill Carnival
Chinese New Year

116

Confusing words
Giving an opinion
118

What next?
L: Listeni ng to opinions, a news report
F: Expressing approval and disapproval
S: Photo discussion
So ng: Turn
126

Writing a formal letter of application
Applying for a job

hold back, get back, call back, get in

split in, wear off

Running out of time
Confusing words
Phrasa l verbs: carry out, give up, hondover,

119

R: Pygmalion
by George Bernard Shaw

keep on, send in, take on, take up
128

130

133


~ho

aTe the .Titish?
-';.xalft traInIng

Quiclcquiz

Matching headings
Try to identify the main point of each paragraph while
you are reading. This will help you to understand what
you are reading and to remember what you have read.

How much do you know about Britain?
1 What is the name of the political union which includes
England , Scotland , Wales and Northern Ireland 7
2 What is the geograph ical name for England, Scotland
and Wa les?
3 What is the shortest distance between England and
France 7
a 24 km
b 34 km
c 48 km
4 How can people travel to France?
a by ferry
b via a bridge
c via a tunnel

JI------------

5

Match headings a-h to paragraphs 1-7. There is one
heading you do not need.
A successful comb in ation
An independ ent island
Recent history
Ou r view of others
Four nations in one
Ancient history
g Surprising contradictions
h A necessary indu stry
a
b
c
d
e

SCOT'EA-NO

6

In pairs, tell your partner what you remember reading.
Use the headings to help you.

7 Answer the questions about the text.
rfRELAND

1 Whose opi nion s does the writer refer to? Why?
2 What does the writer fi nd i nteresti ng about British
cha racteristics?

WALES

FRANCE

Vocabulary
Def>(..ribin9 (..hara(..terif>ti("f>

8

Reading
2

Match words 1-5 to their meanings a-e.
1
2
3
4

characteristics
genera lisations
accents
backgrounds

5 customs

a
b
c
d

traditional ways of be having
different kinds of pronunciation
distinctive features or qualities
statements based on a few
examples
e experiences and upbringing

3

Look at the title of the article opposite. What information
do you think it includes?

4

Read the text quickly. Write the time you start and finish.
How long did it take?
Starting time: _ _
Finishing time : _ _
Tim e taken: _ _

The words below all describe people's characteristics.
Match each word in 1-5 to the correct meaning, a or b.
1 ta Ikative / direct
a saying what you mean
b likin g to talk a lot
2 aggressive / arrogant
a behaving as though yo u are better than others
b ready or likely to attack
3 serious / reserved
a quiet or shy
b thoughtful or unsmiling
4 tolerant / traditional
a accepting something you dislike or disagree with
b relating to an old way of life
5 outgoing / excitable
a quick to show enthusiasm
b friendl y and interested in others


'R eading

='JATIONALcharacteristics
We often see other nationalities as having a set of
characteristics which set them apart from others,
particularly ourselves: the Italians are excitable and love
children, the Finns are reserved people who say very little,
an d so on. But, if you look more closely, the situation
appears more complicated. You become aware that the
Italians, for example, have the fewest children per family in
Europe, and the Finns love to talk on their mobile phones.
The British are famous for their tolerance and sense of
humour, yet they don't always say what they think and can
be intentionally rude. This amazes Americans, who do not
un derstand such behaviour. Britain's nearest neighbours
can be just as surprised as the Americans. French writer
.-\ndre Maurois wrote: 'In France, it is rude not to have a
conversation with someone: in England, it is unwise to
have one. No one there blames you for silence. When you
have not opened your mouth for three years, they will
-hink, "This Frenchman's quite a nice fellow".'
As with the Italians and the Finns, the truth about the
British is, of course, much more complicated. However,
erhaps certain generalisations can be made. Britain is an
sland - a fact not changed by the construction of the
~ h a nnel Tunnel - and it has not been successfully
conquered since 1066. For this reason, Britain and the
3ritish remain deeply individualistic.
However, the British are not one nationality but four,
. 'ho all see each other differently. To the English, the Welsh
:!re a much more talkative group than themselves, and
_'1deed Wales has produced many preachers and trade
~nion leaders, particularly in the 19 th century. In contrast,
:"'le Scots are seen as serious and sometimes mean.

9 Complete the sentences using words from 8.
1 That man is so
' He th inks he is more
important than everyone else.
2 Hatty is not very
at the best of times.
She's normally very quiet.
. He never shouts at the chi ldren
3 He's so
when they are noisy and excitable.
4 Julia just can 't be
. She always has to
make a joke about the situation.
:) Some peop le become very
when they
drive. They are real ly quite dangerous.
6 Stella makes friends very quickly. She's very

6

In the 1950s, many Commonwealth Citizens, mostly
from the West Indies, emigrated to Britain. Others came
too: Asians came from the Indian subcontinent and Africa,
and Chinese people came from Hong Kong. Many of these
newcomers have put in a lot of effort to build up successful
businesses. Together with Arabs and Africans, they make up
6.4% of the population and help to form what is now a
multi-racial society.
Even though the people in Britain all have different
accents, different cultural backgrounds and different views,
and even different languages, they are still all part of an
island race, whose culture and customs are mixed so well
together that they produce a British identity.
To understand Britain, however, its people tell you, takes
many visits. Bearing in mind their inability to say what
they mean, this probably translates as: 'Although we regard
tourism as rather undesirable, we put up with it because we
need the business the visitors are bringing in.'
Based on Brian Bell , Insight Guides - Great Britain

'Phrasa\ ve.rbs
10 Underline the correct phrasal verbs in 1- 5, then match
them to meanings a- e. The verbs appear in the text.
1 We al l put in / brought in a lot of work for th is exam .
2 It takes time to make up / build up a successful business.
3 Together they make up / put up with a group of very
interesting people.
4 I find it difficu lt to bring in / put up with arrogant
people.
5 Tourism now brings in / put in a large amou nt of money.
a develop (over time)
b bear or stand
c attract (business)

d form
e spend a lot of time doing

What nationa l characteristics are mentioned in the article?
Who do they belong to? Are you su rprised by any of these!
Why? Why noU
Why does the writer think the British are individualists?
What are your nationality's characteristics? What events and
situation s have helped to form them?


Present simple and present
continuous
1

~1.1 Listen to an interview with Camilla, the girl in the
photo, and choose the correct words or phrases to
complete the sentences.
1 Camilla looks a like Posh Spice. b amazing.
2 She often works as a a model. b a look-alike.
3 Peopl e are offering Cami lla more and more a money.
b work.
4 Camilla is a not studying now. b still at university.
5 Today, Camilla is a staying at home. b working for a
magazine.
6 People are always asking her for a an autograph. b about
the future.

Present simple and present continuous
Uses

1

Look at the uses of the present simple and present
continuous. Match sentences 1-6, about Camilla,
in 1 above to uses a-f.
Present simple
We use the present simple for:
a somethi ng that happens regularly or is a routin e
_2_

b something that is permanent or generally true

2 Put the verb in brackets in the correct form of the present
simple or present continuous.

Present continuous
We use the present conti nuous for:
c something that is happening at, or around , the
moment of speaking _ _
d something that is temporary, or not a normal
routine _ _
e a changing situation _ _
something that often happens and annoys the
speaker _ _
Form

2 Decide whether sentences 1-4 refer to the present
simple or the present continuous.

1 We form the negative and questions with do (

does.
2 We add an

s to the third person singular verb, e.g.

works, lives.
3 We form this tense with the verb be + the -ing
form of the verb.
4 Some verbs are not used in this tense, e.g. think,

know, understand.

1 I
(work) in Paris this week, filming an
advert for sportswear.
2 Jamie
(not ( play) football every week.
3 Look! Why
(they ( wear) those Batman
costumes?
4 _ _ _ _ _ (you (l ike) the new Victoria Beckham CD?
5 He _ _ _ _ _ (not sing). It's a recording. Look at his
lips.
6 They _ _ _ _ _ (usual ly ( not watch) television at
the weekend.
7 Sheena
(always ( phone) really late at
night. She 's so annoyin g.
8 According to scientists, the Earth
(get)
hotter.

3 Make questions from these notes. Then ask and answer
the questions in pairs.
1 what ( you ( usually ( do ( at the weekend?
2 what ( you ( do ( now?
3 you ( read ( anything interesting at the moment?
4 how often ( you ( usually ( go ( to the cinema?
5 who ( be ( your favourite ( actor?
6 what kind of music (you (l ike?
7 what subjects ( you ( study ( this year?


Let's activate
• Non-continuous forms Some verbs which describe states
are not norm all y used in th e continuou s, e.g. be, love,

have, think.

lntervie~
7

action , e.g. Anne has two sisters (state). She's having a
shower (action).
Look at these verbs and decide which verbs describe a
state and which describe an action.
bel ieve

go

study
know
includ e
be
sl eep
want

work

d isl i ke

li ke
live
do

spe nd
need

loo k
love

hate
ma ke

und erstand

Imagine you are a famous person. Decide:








• Som e verbs are used to describe either a state or an

a famous person

what you do .
what your usual routine is.
which fun ction s you norm ally attend, e.g. parties, dinn ers.
what thin gs are changin g in your life.
how you fee l when som eon e recognises you .
wh at you are doing this wee k / month .
what you like / don't like about the job / your life.

8

In pairs, interview each other to find out the information
in 7.

9

Write a short article for a magazine about your partner's
life. Use your notes to help you .

speak

Action verbs

Stative verbs

believe

-

Match questions 1-6 to the correct answers, a-f.
1 What are yo u thinkin g?
2 Do yo u see what
I mea n?
3 Where's Patrick?
4 Do yo u think it's a

a He's got ve ry blue eyes and
dark hair.
b No. In my opinion it won't

work.
c Yes, I und erstand perfectl y.
d Yes, I'm see in g Mich ae l,
good id ea?
5 Are yo u goi ng out
but it 's not se rious.
with anyo ne?
e He's havin g a bath .
I was ju st wo nderin g if it
6 What does he look like?
will rain.

Read the article about a look-alike couple. Put the verb in
brackets in the correct tense, present simple or present
continuous.

Supermon
W

hen Michelle Bada

1

Z

(come) home

from work as a sales assistant in New York, she
often 2
(find) her husband, (ory, dressed as
Superman . 'He 3
(always do) strange things,
li ke jumping off the furniture and pretending to fly round
th e apartment,' says Michelle. What's the reason for his
strange behaviour? (ory 4
(work) as a lookalike. Th e idea came to him when he was unemployed.
He wanted to be an actor, but it was difficult to find work.
'People were always saying, "You 5
(look)

like Superman. 6
(be) you the actor?" so I
thought to myself "That 's a way to find work!"', explains
(ory. Now he 7
(perform) as Superman a lot
of the time, although at the moment he 8 _ _ _ __
(appear) in a play. In fact, he still

9

(hope) to

make it as a serious actor. If he does, Michelle will miss
being Wonder Woman. She became Wonder Woman to
keep (ory company. 'I was self-conscious at first, but now I
10
(begin) to enjoy it ', she says. 'It's fun!'


Let's practise grammar
'Present simp\e and present l.ontinuous
1

Put the verb in brackets in the correct tense, present
simple or present continuous.

1 Most people
(want) to be good at their
job.
2 Kate is a supermodel. She
(travel) all
round the world.
3 _ _ _ _ _ David _ _ _ _ _ (do) athletics today?
4 Teenage tennis stars _ _ _ _ _ (get) younger and
younger.
5 Tina
(always / complain) about having no
money, but she's got more money than me!
6 Paul
(save up) to buy a new computer.
(a lways / talk) on her mobile. She
7 Rachel
even uses it in the cinema!
you normally _ _ _ __
8 What time
(sta rt) work 7
9 I _ _ _ _ _ (not understand) these instructions.
Something _ _ _ _ _ (see m) to be missing.

2

Underline the correct form of the verb to complete the
text.

.Englishman
In NewYork

3

Read the sentences. Then rewrite them using the time
expression in brackets and the present continuous where
possible.

Example

I'm having lunch early today.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

I have lunch early. (today)
Roger doesn't know Maggie very well. (at the moment)
I understand you. (now)
Paul goes to work by bus. (this week)
jenny spends a lot of time with james. (lately)
Charlie studies German. (this year)
The sports programme includes water sports. (this
month)

4 Complete the sentences using the correct form of have.
1 julia
brown hair and blue eyes.
2 We
ju st
a cup of coffee.
Would you like one?
3 I think joe _ _ _ _ _ a sleep. He said he was tired.
a fear of spiders. I can't stand them.
4 I
a break for lunch at 12.30
5 At school we
every day.
6 Simon looks awful. He _ _ _ _ _ a very bad cold
and a headache .
7 I received a postcard from Sophie this morning. She
_ _ _ _ _ a wonderful time in Greece.
8 jess
driving lessons. She hopes to take her
test next month.

'It's not until you go abroad, or meet people
from another country, that you 1 think / are

thinking of yourself in terms of having a
2 talk
/ are talking in his new flat in New York. Leon
is British but 3 lives / is living in New York for a

national identity', says Leon Davies. We

year, while doing a post-graduate degree at
Columbia University. '14 don't remember / am

not remembering thinking about national
differences in England. But when you are
surrounded by people from many other
countries, you

5

start / are starting to notice

the way different nationalities 6 express / are
expressing themselves, the way they 7 behave /

are behaving, and so on.' I 8 ask / am qsking
him if he 9 feels / is feeling British. 'That's just
it', he says. 'Now I'm away from home, I've
10 have / am
talk / am talking about
always know / am always

become a typical Englishman. I

having tea at 4.30,
the weather, and

12

11

knowing the cricket score.'


Extension
See, hear, feel. taste and smell

6 Complete the sentences using see, hear, taste, feel and
( > P134 )

These verbs can be used to describe our senses. When used
in this way, we do not usually use them in the continuous.
In stead we use them with con.
Examp les

can see Jeremy coming down the road.
can taste nuts in this chocolate.

e use taste,jeel and smell without can to describe the
we are eating, touching, smelling, e.g. This apple

smell correctly.
1

_ _ _ _ _ you _ _ _ _ _ the music? I think

there must be a party somewhere.
horrible. I'd better open the
2 That fish
window.
a draught. Is there a window open?
3 I
4 This dessert
wonderful. It's so fruity.
(not) what that
5 I need new glasses. I
poster says and it's only a few metres away.
cold.
6 That wind
7 I
something burning.

~'1in g

:astes had.

Adve.rbs of

fre.que.nG~ ( > P134 )

7 Put the adverb in brackets in the correct position.
5 Look at the pictures below and write your own sentences
using smell, taste, feel and see.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

jo is late for work. (regularly)
Steve plays cricket after school in summer. (frequently)
My sister is borrowing my clothes. (always)
Mark doesn't drink tea. (usually)
They don't watch television in the evening. (often)
My friend lane is bad tempered. (never)
I am forgetting my homework. (a lways)
Do you visit London? (ever)

The. ri9ht \'lord
8 Complete the text using the correct form of these verbs.
write .. begin
look .. put on .. appear
.. hope .. play .. be .. look

The pop star 'king' of rock 'n' roll
Writer Lee Hall's play Cookin~ with Elvis
1
about an Elvls
impersonator. Joe Ca~rey ,- - - - Elvis in this production . When .he .
his white SUit,
-h-e-4- - just like the
king of rock 'n ' roll. At the
moment. Caffrey
5
in the show
in the West End. Lee
Hall 6
to
make a name for himself
as a writer. His work, which
includes the film Billy Efliot,
J, 7
at life and
death in a comical, imaginative
way. Hall 8
a new
play, which he 9

will be as successful as Cookmg
with Elvis.


Listening and speaking

PsycholDetric tests
Listening

f>o.n announc.ement
3 ~1.2 Listen to an announcement for a talk and
complete the notes.

Subject:
Place:
Sta rti ng ti me:
Speaker:
No. of seats:

Personality test
1 Try these questions from a personality test and
see what the results show about you. Be honest
with your answers.

1 Are you more successfu I at:
a dealing with the unexpected and seeing
quickly what you must do?
b following a careful ly worked out plan?
2 Are these statements true or false for you?
a People should sort out their own
problems.
b I can get more done when I work alone.
c I like telling people funny stories.
d I show my emotions easily.

Ability test
2

Answer these questions to see how good you
are at solving visual problems.

1 What's the next shape in the sequence: a, b, c
or d?

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

@ •

2 How many L-shapes are required to fill the
square without leaving any gaps?

(Answers on page 151)

y

"~G'" tIG#n#ng

}

True odalse?
Read each statement very carefu ll y before you listen. Only
part of the statement may be true.

4

~1.3 Now listen to the talk and decide if statements
1-6 are true or false.
1 Psychometric tests can be compared to a questionnaire.
2 The tests are used by 18% of UK employers to recruit
new staff.
3 The tests are sometimes expensive and take a lot of
time.
4 The results of the tests are always reliable.
5 If you prepare well for the tests, you are more li ke ly to
get the job you want.
6 If you can 't answer a question, you should try to guess
the answer.


:> Some of these words were in the talk. In pairs, decide

what the difference in meaning is between each pair of
words.

Havin9 a c.onversation
11 ~1.5 In a discussion

it is important that one person
does not do all the talking. Read the dialogue. Then listen
to the recording and fill in the gaps.

management / staff
2 employers / employees
3 job / work
4 interviewer / interviewee
5 recruit / make redundant

Saying what you think / Inviting people to speak
Ben

6 Complete the sentences using one word from each pair in
5 in the correct form .

1 Many

Anna

nowadays have the right to strike.

2 When asked questions,

are always

nervous about their answers.
3 Jim has been looking for a _ _ _ _ _ for several

Joseph

months now.
4 The problems in the company have been caused by the
bad
of the company directors.
5 Jenny lost her job but a company in town is
_ _ _ _ _ more staff at the moment.

Personally, I don't think that you need a sense of
humour to be an artist. 1
Anna?
It seems to me that a sense of humour's essential
it helps you
for anything you do. 2
to deal with all sorts of problems. What do you
think, Joseph7
Well, generally speaking, 3
that it
helps, but I'm not sure it's essential.

Disc.ussion
12

In pairs, decide what jobs the people in the pictures do,
then talk about what qualities people need to do them.
Use the list in 10 and the expressions in 11 to help you .

Speaking
?ronunc.iation
~

Look at the underlined part of the verb. This marks
the stressed syllable. Which syllable is it for most of
the verbs? In pairs, practise saying the words.
1 decide
2 entertain
3 annQy
4 att ract
5 emplQy

6 behave
7 perform
8 motivate
9 confuse
10 invent

Make nouns from the verbs in 1-10 in 7 using the endings
below. You may have to change some letters.

·our -ment -ion -ance

~1.4 In pairs, say the nouns you made in 8 and decide
whi ch syllable is stressed. Are the stressed syllables in the
nou ns the same as those in the verbs? Listen and check
our answers.

oc.abu\ar'l

-.x:.,ID traInIng j.....----------_
Role plays
Use your personal experience and the experience of
people you know to help you imagine the situation and
pretend you are actually in it.

\

Here are some qualities people need for different kinds of
j obs. Complete the words.
1

patien _ _

2

determinat

3 phys ical streng,.,_
4 a se nse of hum
3 a se nse of responsibil __ _
the ab il
to work alone
abi lity to co-oper___ with others
8 to ler___ _
6

9 fiexibil

13

Student A: You have seen an advert for a summer job in a
hotel and are phoning the hotel about the job. Find out
about:


experience or qualifications needed for the job




payment offered
hours and days of work

Student B: look at the information on page 141 and
answer Student A's questions


Writing a letter about yourself

3

Punctuation in English

Sam is writing to Compu-pen-friends to introduce hersel f.
Add the correct punctuation to her email.

Symbol and name
a comm a
a full stop
(

a ca pital letter

?

a qu esti on mark
,

speech marks
an excl amat ion mark
a co lon
an apost roph e

A Wh en are these punctuation symbols used in
English ?
B How do these uses compare with punctuation in
your language?

1

Listen to your teacher read out a paragraph in English .
Write what he / she says, including the punctuation . Can
you see any differences between how you punctuate in
English and your language? What are they?

Studying the sample
2

Read the advertisement and answer the questions.

1 Wh at is a penfri end?
2

dear ms smith
i saw your advert and would like to
apply for a pen friend my name is sam i
am 17 years old tall and have black hair
and brown eyes
1 i dont know if i m a typical australi an or
not i go surfing but i dont have a pet
koala and i never call people sport isnt
that how people see australians
3 i m quiet but i have a sense of humour i
enjoy going to discos and we have
beach barbecues in summer i ve always
been interested in music but my passion
is jazz
• my family live in a bungalow outside
town my parents are teachers i have
two sisters
the most interesting school subject for
me is history i can speak french but i am
not good at maths
5 i intend to visit the usa as i find it
fascinating i m looking forward to having
a penfriend
yours sincerely
sam dunsford
1

Would it be interestin g to have a penfri end in anoth er
country? Why?

-FRIENDS

4

Now match these headings to the paragraphs in Sam's
email.
a Futu re pia ns
b Physical description
c Home and school

d Character and interests
e Nati onality

Steps to better writing
Desc..riptions

5

Looking for a penfriend?

Look no further!

1

hair?

2
3

si ze?
eyes?
curly

stocky

wavy

of medium build
bl ack
round
brown
short
fair
slim
well -bu i It
gree n
blu e
straight
dark

Simply complete the application form below and email it to us together
with a short description of yourself. We'll do our best to match you on
our computer to someone you'll really click with!
~~~ Janet Smith smith@compupen.co

Which of the adjectives can describe:

6

Use some of the words in 5 to write three sentences
describing your appearance.


C.harac.ter

odif1in9 adverbs
odifying adverbs are used before adjectives to strengthen or
=a ke n them .

10

=- amples
not very tired.
; completely crazy.
-

Look at the adverbs below and complete 1 and 2.
ve ry

extremely

quite

rather

absolutely

completely

really

11

much they strengthen adjectives.
m oderate degree

1

qui et

a slow to make friends

2
3
4
5
6
7

shy

b unemotional

8

1 Put the adverbs in ord er in the table according to how

A large degree

,...

Match words 1-8 to their opposites, a-h.

easy-going

c confident

generous

d impati ent

friendly

e mean

affectionate

f outgoing

nervous

g uncaring

sensitive

h calm

Use the words in 10 to complete these sentences so that
they are true for you.

1 I'm
by natu re.
2 My friends say that I am a(n)

Completely

sort of

perso n.

2

Which two adverbs can be used before ungradable

right or correct but cannot
adjectives like nice or pretty?

adjectives like
gradable

a nice

co upl e.

2

Lon don is a(n)

3 Th e British have a(n)

Understandin9 the

12

an astonishing sight th e other day. I
a boring

t hi ng to do, we need th e exercise.

6 ' Five plus five is ten. ' 'That is

right. '

,', hi ch of these prepositions can you use with words 1-7.
SD me words take more than one.

1

3
.!

interested
asha med
proud
oood

tas~

'P\annin9

different kind of

3 Althou gh we think walking is

_

person.

You are going to send a letter to Compu-pen-friend s introducing
you rse lf.

co uldn 't beli eve my eyes.

In • of

I'd like to think I was a(n)

Writing a letter about yourself

diet from the French.

on

5

towards other people.

I sometimes find it difficult to be _ _ __ _

popular place with

to urists. Millions visit the city eac h year.

I saw

I think I'm quite

be used with

Use one of the adverbs in 7 to complete each sentence.
"I ore than one answer may be possible.

1 My new neighbours seem to be

3
4

with

by

5 embarra ssed
7 bored



futu re plan s



character and interests



physical description



hom e and sc hool

Writin9
13

at

6 keen

In pairs use these points to plan your profile. Decide what
order the paragraphs will be in.

Now write your letter following your plan. Use some of
the adjectives and adverbs in this section.

C.hec.~in9

14

Check that:


your punctuation and grammar are correct.



you have spelled words correctly.



your letter is interesting.



you have included so me of the adjectives and adverbs
you have studied.



you have written betwee n 120-150 words.

...
''''
~


Word focus
Who are- the-

~ritish?

Extension

1 Put the correct form of the word in brackets in a suitable
place in the sentences.
1 The Welsh are thought to be a group of people. (ta lk)
2 People in Britain come from many different
backgrounds. (culture)
3 Do you think men are more than women? (aggression)
4 I like Tom but he always seems very when you talk to
him. (reserve)
5 Nowadays, people all over the world need to be towards
one another. (tolerance)
6 My mother's always telling my sister not to be so and to
try to keep calm. (excite)

'Phrasa\ ve-rbs
2 Complete the replies to questions 1-5 using the correct
form of these phrasal verbs.
bring in
make up
1


o

2


o

3


o

4


o

5


o

build up

put in

4 Change adjectives 1-6 into nouns. Then match them with
meanings a-f.
1
2
3
4
5
6

tolerant
serious
traditional
arrogant
aggressive
individualistic

a
b
c
d
e

accepting something you dislike
behaving as though you are better than others
something which has been done for years
being different from others
feeling of wanting to attack others
state of being sensible or important

put up with

Ne-9ative- a4ie-l.tive-s

How hard do I need to work to pass the exam?
I think you will need to
a lot of work.
I can't work with all that noise going on!
I'm sorry but you'll just have to
it for
the moment.
What exactly does the United Kingdom consist of?
It's
of England , Wales, Scotland and
Northern Ireland.
What are the real advantages of tourism?
Well, for one thing, it
a lot of money.
Do you think Sam 's business will ever be successful?
Oh yes, when he 's
more trade.

Words l.onne-l.te-d with jobs
3 Put the letters in

1-8 in the correct order to make words

to complete the text.

D~ar 'Paul,

I 11
I w~nt for mi fir5t vie\>linter for a job tl1~ otl1~r aai· {\\ t ~
otl1~r ' eef>vieter\>lin wl10 w~r~ waiting in tl1~ room loo¥:~a
~'l-tr~m~li n~rVOU5, but I au.ia~a tl1at I woula t~ to 5tai Galm.
1h~ wmpani l1aa aUiMa to ' ture-ire two n~w
4 \epemo~ef> 5traigl1t from 5G11001, f:,O w~ w~r~ all about tl1~
5am~ ag~ w~ tal¥:~a for about l1alf an 110ur, ana I wa5 tl1en
ta¥:~n to m~~t 50m~ of tl1~ ~'l-i5ting S f>afft. I mU5t 5ai tl1~i w~r~
all v~~ fri~nali ana ~v~n maM 50m~ jO¥:~5 about tl1~1r
" p\o~emerf> ana tl1~ 1 bojf> tl1~i ao tl1~r~. I qUlt~ ~njoi~a tl1~
wl1ol~ ~'l-p~rienG~, 50 I 110p~ I'm going to b~ IUG¥:i enougl1 to
• \(rO\>l tl1~r~ f:,Om~tim~ 500n.
Your5,
I

~e-\1

Wordbui\din9

5 Add in, un or im to make adjectives 1-11 negative. Which
prefix is used the most often?
1
2
3
4
5
6

tolerant
intentional
popular
successful
able
desirable

7 willing
8 personal
9 patient
10 reliable
11 friendly

6 Now complete these sentences using adjectives in 5 in the
positive or negative form.
1 I am sorry that I'm
to come to your party
on Saturday.
2 I apologise for upsetting you. I didn 't mean it. It was
completely _ _ _ __
3 My father is a very
man . He seems to be
liked by everybody.
4 The cashier at the bank was
to help the
customer. She simply refused to serve the woman.
5 I think sending an email is a rather
way
of thanking someone.
6 Ja ne is nice when you get to know her but she see ms
rather
at fi rst.
7 Tony is too
. He's always losing his temper.
8 Don 't depend on Sally. She's very
. She
may say she'll help you, but she probably won't.


Culture focus

Different perspectives on the EU
Acting like a huge umbrella, the European Union reaches over the lives of all who live in it: through the
creation of common laws, regulations and markets, there is no one it doesn't affect. The number of hours
w e work, the amount of holidays we have, the money many countries use, the system of agriculture, and
the level of environmental protection are all decided to some extent by the EU. Its creation also means
t hat people are much freer to live and work where they want to within the EU .
recent survey of 1,225 people
between the ages of 21 and 35
in Germany, France, Italy and
Britain found that a majority of young
adults stili identify themselves with
th eir native countries. But close to onethi rd prefer to call themselves
European; in Italy, the number is over

A

40%.
However, some people worry that the
existence of the EU means that
Individual countries within it are losing
heir uniqueness: their own identity. 'It
w as very different when I travelled
across Europe 17 years ago', says
Fran<;oise, who lives in Paris. 'Each
co untry was very different from the
oth ers. Now you walk through Paris or
London and you see the same shops.
Unity is good but maybe we are losing
something special.'
Others, however, think they have
ga ined something. Julia, a young Brit
w ho lives in Brussels says, 'People in
Brussels speak several different
languages, so you don't think about
anyone's nationality. You can get used
o that and so when you go to places
w here you don't have that mix, you
!eel you are missing out on someth ing .'

Constantine, who was born in
Greece, has also experienced the same
feeling in his home vi llage. He has lived
in several different European capitals,
and says that because he works for
international companies, and has
friends in many different countries, he
feels at home in an international
environment. So when he visits his
parents, he feels a bit like a tourist
these days. However, that doesn't stop
him wanting to return home when he
has children. 'Of course I want my
children to grow up in my own country,
with grandparents and aunts and
uncles', he says.
The idea of a united Europe was
developed by France and Germany
after the Second World War. Both
powers feared that another war would
destroy the continent again. Today,
young people in western Europe have
grown up with a Europe that is firmly
united. With the expansion of the EU,
more countries wi ll be added to the
cultural mix. Optimists hope that this
will enrich us all. Pessimists fear that
the countries entering the Union for
the first time wi ll become more and
more like all the rest.

Read the article and answer these questions.
What effect has the EU had on job seekers?
2 In the countries that took part in the survey, where did
most young ad ults feel they belonged?
3 What negative effect do some people think the EU has
had?
4 What kind of environment does Constantine feel happy
in?
5 Why did the idea of the EU seem a good one to France
and Germany?
6 How do people feel about more countries entering the
EU?

Talking about your country
1 Do people travel to find work where you live7
2 How strong are national feelings in your country7
3 What do you think is the benefit of being part of an
organisation such as the EU?
4 Do you think it is possible to be part of a larger
organisation , like the EU, and still keep your national
identity?
5 What aspects of your national identity do you want to
protect?


.Ta;,. povveT

50

~oo*

75

Title:

9

~ 99~ '03

3

',000,000

:1:,

1 Follow the instructions.
1 Look at these numbers and objects for 30 seconds and
try to memorise them.
2 Now close your books and write down the numbers
and objects you can remember.
3 Compare your list with a partner's. Which were easier
to remember: the figures or the pictures?

Reading
2 Match adjectives 1-5 to their meanings a-e.
1
2
3
4
5

embarrassing
observant
outstanding
confident
impolite

a
b
c
d
e

feeling sure about your own abilities
extremely good or excellent
making you feel uncomfortable
rude
good at noticing things

";:caln'tTCIinin"

11------------

Skim reading
\

This helps us to understand what a whole text is about.
Before you start to an swer questions about a text, read it
through quickly to get a general idea of what it is about.
Do not worry about the meanings of individual words.

3 Skim read the article and think of a title for it. Then, as a
class, compare titles and decide which one is best.

Have you ever found yourself in the embarrassing po i
of meeting someone you think you have met before bu~ :'
being able to remember their name, or even where or \ ::
you saw their face? Well, you're not the only one! But =
needn't worry - help is on the way. You see, a good merr;
depends on how observant you are. So if you know h o'
use your powers of observation, you can
common memory problems like remembering name
faces.
Many people, when introduced to others, know
they are going to forget their names anyway. For
reason, they go through a whole series of introduCt:!
without really looking at the faces of those they are
introduced to. Their fear of failure actually guarantees
they won't succeed. Even those who do look at new
will often tend to see them as a general picture, and do
really look at specific characteristics. However, because .memory works by making connections between ideas.
also by noticing anything outstanding, it's essential
when you see a new face, you look at it properly so that ~
can remember any unusual features. This doesn't
peering rudely at the person's face, but simply taking
active, intelligent interest.
You can practise this by looking at people in pu
places and giving yourself different parts of the face to '
at. On one day you might concentrate on noses,
day on eyebrows, another day on ears or general
shapes, etc. You will be surprised to find that each pareach face varies enormously from person to person ,
that your increasing ability to notice differences will h e~~
remind you of the new people you meet.
To help you even further, you can use this
remembering names when being introduced. If
it's appropriate, ask for the name to be


--:peated, and then use it politely in the conversation you
~Ye . It's far more polite to use the name of the person
u've just met than to refer to them as 'you', or 'he' or
-e' when talking to a third person.
Another good idea is to ask about the meaning of the
::::'Son's surname. Most people have some knowledge of, or
-,. interested in, the meaning of their names and are happy
talk about it. During the conversation, if there's anything
~usual about either the face or the name, try to link it with
:nething else that will help you to remember. The
:"'an tage of this is that the more successful you become at
-::nembering names, the more confident and happier you
~ be about meeting new people.
Tony Buzan, Make the Most of your Mind

4 Answer these questions about the text.
1 What do a lot of people often find difficult to remember?
2 Why does this happen?
3 If we have a bad memory, what should we try to do in
our everyday lives?
4 What are most people interested in7

~~crl.nt,crl..I"!J ~~--------------------~
Multiple choice
Read the first part of the question and each possible
answer carefully. If you are not sure about an answer, try
to work out why the other answers are incorrect.

\

~

Read these questions, then choose the best answer, a, b, c
or d. Underline the part of the text which helps you to
find the right answer.
1 When people are introduced to others, they often
a remember only the faces of the people they see first.
b give up trying to remember names and faces too
easily.
c are afraid of meeting people they do not know.
d remember the specific characteristics of only one
person's face.
2 The writer suggests that the best way to train yourself to
remember names and faces is to
a try to meet as many new people as possible.
b stare hard at any new face you see.
c become more observant of what people are wearing.
d look for differences in one particular facial feature.

3 What does the writer suggest you do when meeting
others?
a Avoid comments which require using someone's
name.
b Repeat a person's name as often as possible.
c Show an interest in the meaning of a person's
surname.
d Explain the meaning of your own name.
4 What is the writer's conclusion?
a People will find the methods he is suggesting work.
b Not everyone will be successful at remembering
names and faces.
c There may be other more effective ways of
remembering things.
d Confidence has very Iittle to do with memory.

Vocabulary
The brain and perc.eption
6

Match the pairs of words below to the pairs of sentences
1-5. Then complete the sentences using the correct word .
• brain / senses . memory / mind • remember / remind
• observation / concentration • meaning / explanation
1 a You can practise your powers of
In
crowded places.
b It needed a lot of
to solve the maths
problems.

2 a Can you
b I can never
name.

3 a Which of our five
most important?
b The human
than we ever imagined.
4 a What's the
b Can you think of an
behaviou r?

me to post this letter?
our new neighbour's
do you think is the
is much more powerful
of the word mind?
for his strange

5 a

I have such a poor
. I'm particularly
bad with dates.
b A lot of his problems are all in his _ _ _ __

lf2?dEIJ,'ena
What are you very good / bad at remembering7
What kinds of things bring back memories for you , e.g.
sou nds, smells, sights?
What do you remember doing during your summer / winter
holidays as a child 7
In what other areas of your life could having a better
memory help you?


Grammar

Modal verbs: ability, permission,
obligation and recommendation
1

Modal verbs

Match cartoons a-f to conversations 1-6. Then complete
the conversations using a suitable verb.

Uses
1 Match can, can't, must, mustn't, should, shouldn't,
and may to the correct use.
a
b
c

obligation to do something: muM
obligation not to do someth ing: _ _ _ __
recommendation to do someth ing: _ _ __

d

recommendation not to do something:

e

ability to do something: _ _ _ __
permission to do something: _ _ _ _ _ and

Forms
Complete the sentences.

2

1 We use modal verbs can, must, mustn't, should,

may + the
work, he, have.
2

form of the verb, e.g.

Modal verbs don 't usually add an
_ _ _ _ _ and

s for he,
forms.

Have to in affirmative sentences has a similar meaning to
must. The negative form of have to is don't have to, which
means something isn 't necessary.

3

Underline the correct verbs to complete the sentences.

1 jeff can / can't play the gu itar, but he wants to learn.
2

You

may not / shouldn't eat

ch ips every day. It's not good

for you.
3
4

1 A You mustn't

your mobile in here.

B Oh, sorry. I forgot.

A And you mustn't
2 A Dad, can I

food either!
to jane 's party on

Saturday?

3
4

5
6

2

e

B No, you can't. I told you , we 're going to Auntie jo's.
A You shouldn't
. It's bad for your health.
A I must
Tanya. What's her number?
, I ca n never remember phone
B I can't
numbers.
A You may
into see the vet now.
B Thanks.
A What should I
to the party?
B How about your new black jumper)

Decide whether the words in bold in 1 express ability,
permission, obligation or recommendation.

5
6

can / should I borrow some money from you?
mustn't / don't have to come if you don't want to.
I can't go out because I have to / may mend my bike.
Loo k at the sign. You don't have to / mustn't park here.
Mum,

You

Moda\s in the past

( ~P13S )

4 Look at the examples and answer the questions.
Today

Past

Sue can speak Chinese.

Sue could speak a lot of languages.

She has to adapt to
life in the UK.

She had to adapt to life
in China .

She doesn 't have to

She didn't have to go to school

go to school.

in China.

She must work hard.

She had to work hard.

1 What are the past forms of can and can 't?

have to and don't have to?
must!

2

What are the past forms of

3

What is the past form of


Rea d about Sue's childhood memories and underline the
correct words to complete the text.

Let's activate
Ta\\(ing about ru\es and regu\ations
7 ~2.1 Listen to what these teenagers say about the laws,
rules and regulations in their countries, schools or homes.
Make notes about what they say.

a. I 1 can / could speak over ten languages because when I
: .ou ng we lived in a lot of different countries. Now, I live in
; afld and I 2 don 't have to / didn't have to learn any new
;Jages. However, I suppose I just got into the habit of learning
~..., an d so I never stopped. Living in different countries was
out it was also really difficult. Every time we moved to a new
-:r I 3 have to / had to learn a new language and I 4 must /
- ,0 adapt to a new way of life. Did 5 I have to / I had to learn
reall y difficult languages! Yes, Chinese! When I arrived in
_ fi g. I 6 can't / couldn't speak any Chinese, not a single word,
: ,was completely different from any other language I knew.
: of course, the writing is so different. I 7 can / couldn't read
:: ch aracters, or write them at first. I really hated being there for
-'le. But the good thing was that I 8 don't have to / didn't have
;:a to school! I had a teacher at home. I called him 'Mr Must'
-:-:::ause he was always telling me what I must do . .. 'To learn
- '1ese you must practise drawing your characters, you must do
: hours of homework everyday', and so on. Actually, he was a
:: good teacher. When I left China 19 can / could speak Chinese
~::fl tly and I 10 can / could read and write over a thousand
:;ra cters.

Read the text below. Then rewrite it in the past tense.

f(err~

Melanie

start s{.hool - 4

Josh

8

Example

.\ hen she was 16, Som ...

9

Phillip

How old do you have to be to do these things in your
country? Discuss what things you can / can't do, yet.


leave school





vote in an el ection



apply for a pa ssport
ride a moped / drive a ca r



drink alcohol



open a bank account



get married



start sc hool



own a cred it ca rd

What about your parents? Could they do the things in 8 at
the same age?


Let's practise grammar
ma~,

Gan, have. to,
1

must and shou\d

3

Underline the verbs to complete the sentences.

1

Kerry

should / may work

Rewrite the following sentences using the verb in brackets
in the correct form.

1 Were you able to play the guitar when you were three?

harder if she wants to pass the

(can)

exam.

2 You can / have to train every day if you want to be in the

2 It was necessary for me to go home from school

school hockey team .

yesterday, because I was ill. (have to)

3 You mustn't / don't have to use your mobile phone on a

3 Jack wasn 't able to play football because he had a

plane. It isn 't permitted.

broken arm. (can)

4 Sylvia is very artistic. She can / may paint very well, and
she writes poetry too.
5 lan doesn't have to / mustn't help at home, but he
usually does some cooking.
6 Bill shouldn't / can't play basketball, but he's going to
learn next year.
7 Students may / must use the library after school this
week if they want to.
8 You don't have to / shouldn't go to bed so late - I'm not
su rprised you're ti red!

2

Complete the dialogues. Use the correct form of

4

was Saturday night. (have to)

5 Which languages were you able to speak when you were
younger! (can)

6 Eating in the library is not allowed. (must)

4

Complete the sentences with the correct form of
or had to.

You

1 Clare isn't coming out tonight. She

2

can,

He will be tired so you
much, you
you

3

go in and see the patient now.

1

3

4

talk too

2

the picnic.
4

You

5

When I was you nger, I
with my sister.

6

I

Absolutely nothing to eat or drink. He
5

Nurse

It's the hospital regulations. It means you
8
leave by 8 p.m.

Sam

Mum,9
then stay the night?

Mum

When is it?

Sam

Saturday.
Yes, you 10 _ _ _ _ _ go to the barbecue, but
you 11 _ _ _ _ _ stay the night. You

Mum

news reports?'
It was raining yesterday, so we _ _ _ _ _ to cancel

let him rest. Oh, and

understand it.

I go to John's barbecue and

._ _ _ _ _ be home by midnight.

revise

for her exams.
'My brother is a TV newsreader.'
'Oh,
he _ _ _ _ _ memorise his

give him anything to drink.

get out of bed at the moment, but
he 6
sit up for a little while.
Visitor OK. What does this sign mean? I 7 _ _ _ __

must /

mustn't, have to / don't have to

can't, must, mustn't, should, shouldn't or may.
Nurse

It wasn't necessary for us to be home early because it

talk during the exam. It's forbidden .
to sha re a room

remember to buy a present for my

parents tomorrow! It's their anniversary.

5

Correct the mistakes in these sentences.

1 When I was at school, I have to wear a uniform.
2 John have to go to school until he's 16.
3

I couldn 't to speak English when I was 7 years old.

4

I can stay at Jill's house on Saturday, Mum?

5 Celia doesn't have to drive a car by herself. She hasn't
taken her driving test.
6

I don't have to forget to ring Tim tonight. It's his
birthday.

7

We went out last night because we hadn't to do any
homework.


Extension
Ought to, need

to ( ~P134 )

6 Read examples a-e and answer questions 1-4.
a You ought to visit the Museum of Modern Art when you
are in New York.
b We need to go shopping; there isn't any food at home.
c Jane doesn't need to learn French because she already
speaks it very wel l.
d Sam needs to get a new mobile phone card; his old one
doesn't work.
e Do you need to have a visa to visit your country?
1 Which modal verb do we use to give advice?
2 Which modal verb do we use to talk about necessity to
do something?
3 Which modal verb do we use to talk about something
which isn't necessary to do?
4 How do we form the third person sin gu lar of need to?
Rewrite the sentences using need to, don't need to or
ought to.
Example
Do we have to hand our projects in this week?
Do we need to hand our projects in this week?
1 You must bring proof of your age to get into the disco.
2 You don't have to bring anything to the party; we've got
everyth i ng.
3 You can take photos in the house, but you have to use a
flash.
4 Kate doesn't have to work this evening; she's done all
her homework.
5 Ma rk should do more exercise if he wants to get fit.

-on has no future or infinitive form . Instead , we use be able
e.g. You must be able to read a car number plate at 20. Sm
Dass your driving test.
Co mplete the sentences using can or be able to.
1 You must
swim at least 500m if you want
to do this course.
2
I make an appointment to see the doctor
tomorrow, please?
3 Do you have to
play the guitar to be in
th e pop group?
~ Dave won't
get a part-time job until he's
over 16; his parents won't let him .
:; You won't
drive after only two lessons,
but you will soon learn.
____ _ you understand Einstein 's theory of
re lativity?

the ri9ht ~ord
9 Read the article about dreaming and choose the correct
words, a, b or c, to fill in the gaps.

Most of us think that dreams are unimportant, but
recent studies show that they may be much more
important than we think. They 1
help
us solve our problems and tell us about ourselves.
We've all woken up trying hard to remember the
dream that seemed so important the night before.
remember anything,
However, we 2
except perhaps an image or a feeling. It's frustrating,
so how do we solve this problem? In fact, we
3
to worry because it's possible to
learn to remember our dreams. Once we know how to
programme our brain to
do this, we 4
solve our problems through our dreams.
The best way to try to understand your dreams is
to keep a journal. If you do this - and you
5
do it on a regular basis - after a
while, you notice that you often have the same dream
over and over again .
Every night before you go to bed, train yourself to
take several deep breaths and relax. Then say to
yourself, 'Tonight I want to remember a dream and I
will remember a dream. As soon as I wake up, I
6
write it down.' Go to sleep with
paper and pencil beside your bed, expecting to
remember. It probably sounds silly, but it actually
does work!
If you don't normally remember your dreams - but
only have a feeling of what you dreamed about, for
write
example, anger or calm - you 7
down your feelings.
After a few weeks, this routine will start producing
look back at what
results. Then, you 8
you've written and try to match what happens in your
life with the dreams you've had.

1 a shou ld
2 a can't
3 a shou ld
4 a have to
5 a shou ld
6 a may
7 a shou ld
8 a needn't

b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b

needn't
shou ldn 't
mustn't
can
don't have to
must
mustn 't
can

c
c
c
c
c
c
c
c

can
must
don't need
be ab le to
may not
can
don't need to
don't have to

ED


Listening and speaking

..,dentity parade
Listening
3

1 Photos a-d show four ways of identifying criminals. Match
them to descriptions 1-4.
1
2
3
4

Identity parades
Voice recognition
Computer-aided videofit
Distingui shing marks

2 Which of the means of identification in 1 do you think is
the most and which the least reliable? Why?

~2.2 You are going to hear part of a radio programme
about identity parades. Before you listen, read the notes
carefully. Then listen and complete them.

Wit-ere used:

I

_ _ _ _ __

_

_

Wlt-a.r suspeer a.llowed ro do in line:
z.

--------

Disa.dva.nra.ge: innoeenr person wlt-o
ma.~ be idenriried.

3

lEx.Ift trGlnin"

True or false?
\

Read through the statements carefully but don 't decide
before you listen whether they are true or false. You may
think the statement is true, but what it says may not
match what you actually hear on tape.

p... te\ephone c.onversation
4 ~2.3 Listen to part of a telephone conversation with
Alex Seelig, who takes part in identity parades in his
spare time. Decide if statements 1-5 are true or false.
Correct those which are false.
1
2
3
4
5

...

~I-----------

The phone call is from a police officer.
There is an identity parade on Tuesday afternoon.
They haven 't given Alex much notice.
It starts at 3.50.
Alex can make it.


f:r-p\ainin9
Identifying statements
Listen ca refu Ily beca use the spea ker may ma ke a
statement which is similar to but not exactly the same as
t he one given.

11

Asking / Explaining what something means

I'm not allowed to wear my own clothes.
I'm paid extra to work at short notice.
I sometimes find it difficult to stand sti ll.

12 In pairs, discuss the meaning of these words, using the
expressions in 11 to help you.
a criminal
a witness
manslaughter
a sentence
a trial

listen again. If you have written no next to a
statement, find out what Alex actually said.
(;)2.4

-

Vould you like to take part in an identity parade? Why?
Why not?

13

peaking

Sandy

to get the person they kidnapped back.
_ _ _ _ _ what a verdict is?
No, I can 't. Let 's 6 _ _ _ __

Sandy

1 I saw an advert for the job in a local newspaper.
2 I've taken part in over 15 parades.

6 I'm often asked to put on a false beard.
We don't see the witness.
8 I've never been identified as the suspect.

Joe

You see this word 'burglar'. 1
?
I think it's someone who 2
into
someth i ng.
a house to 3
4
! And can you tell me what
ransom means?
It means something that you pay to kidnappers

Sandy
Joe

~2.4 You are going to hear part of an interview with
Alex. Before you listen, read through the statements
carefully. While you listen, decide whether Alex made
t hese statements or not. Write yes or no beside each one.

3
4
:;

(;)2.6

Read the dialogue. Then listen to the recording
and fill in the gaps.

kidnapping
speeding
arrest
a judge
a ransom

murder
a burglar
a thief
a Jury
a reward

a suspect
fraud
a mugger
an offence

Underline the words in 12 which refer to people.

14 In another pair, discuss what these punishments are.

~-o n unc.iation

~2.5 These words appear in the interview with Alex.
Li sten to them again and underline the main stress in
each one.

Then discuss which crimes in 12 they are suitable
punishment for.
• corporal punishment • the death penalty
• a prison sentence . a fine . community service

Example
~terested

business
2 application
3 definitely
,
co mmitted

1

5 additional
6 penniless
7 disciplined
8 suspect

Practise reading the words in 8 aloud. Make the stressed
louder than the others.

S\ liable

" rite out the parts of speech asked for in 1-7 and
nderline the stressed syllable.
1 the verb form of application
2 t he adjective form of definitely
3 th e verb form of committed
.! the adverb form of additional
:; the nou n form of interested
- the noun form of disciplined
- the verb form of suspect

\2.o\e p\a'f
15 Student A: You

have had your bike stolen while shopping.
You are in the police station reporting the crime to an
officer (Student B). Answer the officer's questions.
Student B: You are a police officer. look at the
information on page 141 and ask Student A about their
bike.


..Y

.~~

Dear Maria,
Thanks for you I t
r e ter. It was nice to hear 1
you.
- -_ __

~e~ot~e Lake District is a ~onderful place. I'm glad YOU war- - - - - a VISit
You can travel there 3 '
.
you should take the tral'n
.,
train or coach. I thi nk
, as It s much quO k
comfortable We can d
IC er and more
rop you off 4
.
.
station. It would be bette t
- - - - - the
5
.
r 0 travel on Friday morning
avoid the weekend
h If
ticket book it 6
rus. you want a ch eap
As 7
advance - it's much ch
- - - - - places to st I h'
eaper.
youth hostel. They're chea an ay, t Ink you ought to try a
people.
p d good places for meeting

WANT TO IMPROVE YOUR ENGLISH?

Try a home-stay course in London.
Stay with a host family.
Study in the comfort of someone's home.
Individual lessons daily.
Full board and accommodation provided.

Most people go there to walk or do
also visit the home of th f
water Sports, but you ca n
e amous Poe t W"II'
You're right 8
I lam Wordsworth.
the weather It' f
k
ta e some waterproof cloth'
.. s 0 ten wet, so
Looking forward 9
Ing and wal.klng boots.
10
meeting you.

1 look at the advert and answer the questions.

1 What is a home-stay visit?
2 What might be the advantages of doing a course like
this?
3 What might be the disadvantages?

Sa,II~

Studying the sample
Maria is going on a three-week home-stay course in London.
She would like to visit places outside London , but she doesn't
know where to go. She has written to the host family for
suggestions. The host, Sa ll y Martin , has replied.
2

Read the extract from Maria's letter.

Wnile I'm in Sngland ne'f.t montn I'd like to 5pend a long weekend out
of London but I don't know vef'j mUGn about 17ritain and I'm not
5ure e'f.adli wnere to go ~ome friend5 told me tnat tne Lake Di"trid
i5 vef'j beautiful. Do iOU know tni5 area? Could iOU tell me wnetner it
i" ea5i to get tnere and find "ome-wne-re- to 5tai? I've- al50 ne-ard it i5
ve-f'j wet. c.ould iOU tell me- if tnat i5 true-?
Thank iOU in advanGe for iour nelp.
17e-5t wi5ne-5,
Maria

3 Read the reply Maria received from Sally Martin; ignore
the missing words. Is Sally's letter written in a formal or
informal style? How do you know?

Steps to better writing
4

I


Make notes on the contents of Sally's letter using these
headings.
Transport:
train, car {ram station
Places to stay: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _

What to do:
Weather:

5

Choose the best answer to fill the gaps in Sally 's letter.

1 a to
2 a of
3 a on
4 a at
5 a for
6 a In
7 a for
8 a about
9 a of
10 a Yours
sincerely

b from
b about
b by
b to
b of
b by
b In
b on
b to
b Yours
fa ithfu /ly

c
c
c
c
c
c
c
c
c
c

by
for
In
for
to
about
at
for
at
Best
wishes


Tài liệu bạn tìm kiếm đã sẵn sàng tải về

Tải bản đầy đủ ngay

×