Tải bản đầy đủ

Natural english binder extra tests


LANGUAGE REFERENCE (1-4)
REVIEW EXERCISES (3-4)
NEW WORDS BOOSTERS
TAPESCRIPTS (1-4)
WORD BOXES (3-4)
WORD POLICE (3-4)
READING (3-4)
WORDLISTS (1-4)
SAMPLE PAGES
natural English online-interactive
natural English - description - Purchase the books


language
reference (1-4)


language reference
one
cover & check exercises


be positive and negative
You is singular (1) or plural (2, 3, 4, etc).
You use contractions when you speak English.

full form
I am a teacher.
You are in room 10.
He is English.
She is thirty.
It is a school.
We are students.
They are from Italy.

contractions
I’m a teacher.
You’re in room 10.
He’s English.
She’s thirty.
It’s a school.
We’re students.
They’re from Italy.

negatives
I’m not a teacher.
You aren’t (are not) in room 10.*
He
English.
She isn’t (is not) thirty.*
It
a school.
We aren’t students.
They aren’t from Italy.

* These contractions are possible:

They aren’t from Italy. / They’re not from Italy.
He isn’t English. / He’s not English.
go to exercises 1.1 and 1.2


Use a /@/ before a consonant (b, d, s, etc.) sound.

a student

a black taxi

Use an /@n/ before a vowel (a, e, i, o, u) sound.

an airport

an e-mail

an Italian passport

go to exercise 1.3

The verb goes before the subject (I, you, he, etc.).

short answers
Yes, I am. (NOT I’m)
Yes, you are.
Yes, he/she/it is.

negatives
No, I’m not.
No, you aren’t.
No, he / she / it isn’t.

Yes, we are.
Yes, they are.

No, we aren’t.
No, they aren’t.

Don’t use contractions in short answers in the positive form.

NOT Yes, I’m. / Yes, she’s.
go to exercise 1.4

Photocopiable © Oxford University Press 2006

1
2
3
4
5

You
She
I
We
It
They
He
They
I
We

in my class. (+)
married. (–)
from New York. (–)
at university now. (–)
a London taxi. (+)
21. (+)
my teacher. (–)
business students. (–)
a student. (+)
in class 2. (+)

He’s not married.
They aren’t here today.
It isn’t English.
We aren’t doctors.
She’s not single.

1.3 Circle the correct answer.
example She’s a / an American student.
1
2
3
4
5

questions with be
yes / no questions
Am I
in this class?
Are you
married?
Is he / she a teacher?
Is it
difficult?
Are we
in this room?
Are they
English?

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

1.2 Write the contraction in another way.
example We’re not teachers.
We aren’t teachers.

indefinite article a / an
a table

1.1 Complete the sentences.
Use contractions.
example He ’s
from Italy. (+).
They aren’t French. (–)

She isn’t a / an housewife.
I’m a / an engineer.
It’s a / an big book.
He’s a / an actor.
Is he a / an good accountant?

1.4 Order the words to make questions.
Answer the questions.
example a / you / are / student?
Are you a student? Yes, I am.
1 business/ she/ a / student/ is?
.
No,
2 are / from / England / they?
Yes,
.
3 he / married / is? No,
4 this / you / in / are / class?
Yes,
.
5 doctor / she / is / a? Yes,

.

.


two
have got (= have)

cover & check exercises

You use have got to talk about possession.

positive
I / You / We / They ’ve (have) got a car.
He / She / It’s (has) got a printer.
questions
Have you / they got a camera?
Has he / she / it got a printer?

negative
I / You / We / They haven’t got a car.
He / She / It hasn’t got a printer.

short answers
Yes, I / we / they have. NOT Yes, I have got.
No, I / you / we / they haven’t.
Yes, he / she / it has.
No, he / she / it hasn’t.

Remember:

’s = is and has
He’s a doctor.
is

2.1 Write ’s, ’ve, have, or has.
1 Carol
got two phones.
2 We
got a big office.
3
Tom got a Student’s Book?
you got a pen?
4 A
B Yes, I
.
5 My sister
got a TV and a
computer in her bedroom.
2.2 Look at the pictures. Complete the
sentences.
example He ’s got
a computer.

He’s got a computer.
has

go to exercises 2.1 and 2.2
1 He
2 He
3 He

singular and plural nouns
singular
book
pen
dictionary
country
bus
dish
watch

plural
books
pens
dictionaries
countries
buses
dishes
watches

notes
most nouns V +s

person
man
woman
child

people
men
women
children

irregular forms

y V +ies
s, x, ch, sh V +es

natural English person / people /"pi;pl/
singular
This person is from Thailand.
Who’s that person?
go to exercise 2.3

a printer.
a laptop.
a mobile phone.

plural
Who are these people?
Those people are in my class.
NOT Those persons are

4 She
5 She
6 She

7
8
9
10

They
They
They
The laptop

a mobile phone.
a computer.
a digital camera.

a TV.
a CD player.
a laptop.
a printer.

2.3 Write the plural form.
example briefcase briefcases
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

lesson
country
passport
class
businessman
nationality
magazine
person
family
box

Photocopiable © Oxford
University
Press 2006
language
reference
131


2.4 Circle the correct word.
example Is this / these your pen?

this, that, these, those
plural
these books
Are these your books?
those keys
Are those your keys?

singular
this book
Is this your book?
that key
Is that your key?

HERE (near me)
THERE (not near me)

No, these are
my bags.

Is this your bag?

That bus?
No, those buses

possessive ’s

That / Those is my pencil.
This / These is my travel card.
This / These books are very useful.
That / Those e-mails are for me.
That / Those piece of paper isn’t
yours.

2.5 In each sentence, is ’s possessive, is, or
has?
example That teacher’s class is in room 1.
possessive
1
2
3
4
5

go to exercise 2.4

Where’s my travel card?
I think this is the doctor’s car.
My coursebook’s on the table.
Carol’s notebook isn’t here.
Carol’s got a French dictionary.

2.6 Write ’s where necessary.

’s

You use ’s for possession.

example Where are Marco things?

John’s book.
NOT the book of John.
That bag is Barbara’s.

Is this Mr Turner’s car?
My teacher’s name is Chris.

Remember, ’s has three uses:

1 possessive
2 = is
3 = has

1
2
3
4
5

This is Jack’s magazine.
My name’s Ella.
He’s got two passports.

1
2
3
4
5

What is that actor name?
Have you got Anna rubber?
I think the green car is David.
When is your mother birthday?
A Is that your pencil?
B No, it’s Mrs Taylor.

go to exercises 2.5 and 2.6

three
present simple (I / you / we / they)
To talk about things that are always true, or true for a long time:

I come from England.

They don’t live here.

To talk about things you often do / don’t do:

I often walk to school.
They don’t read a newspaper every day.
positive
I / You / We / They

live here.
study English.

negative
I / You / We / They don’t live in Spain.
don’t speak French.
(don’t = do not)

questions
Do I / you / we / they speak English?
Do I / you / we / they like pop music?
go to exercises 3.1, 3.2, and 3.3

Photocopiable
© Oxford
University Press 2006
132 language
reference

short answers
Yes, I / you / we / they do.
No, I / you / we / they don’t.

cover & check exercises
3.1 Complete the sentences with a verb.
example I study
English at school.
1
2
3
4
5

I
I
I
I
I

from Spain.
Spanish and English.
in Madrid.
in an office.
the train to work.

3.2 Make questions from the sentences in
3.1.
example Do you study English at school?
3.3 Make the sentences in 3.1 negative.
example I don’t study English at school.


wh- questions
What do you want?
Where do they live?
How do you get there?
When do they start?

Who are you?
Why is she here?
How far is it?
How many students are in the class?

3.5 Change the sentences into questions. Use
a question word.
example I work in a bank.
Where do you work?

go to exercises 3.4 and 3.5

like + noun/ + -ing
After like and hate, you can use a noun or verb + -ing.

I like Jack.
I hate football.
Do you like Chinese food?

3.4 Match the question words and answers.
1 Who?
a Nine o’clock.
2 When?
b In room 7.
3 Why?
c Katherine.
4 How many?
d Because it’s good.
e Ten.
5 Where?

I quite like watching TV.
They don’t like cooking.
We hate shopping.

1
2
3
4
5

I leave the flat at 7.30.
It’s ten kilometres.
I play football because I like it.
I live in Budapest.
They get there by train.

3.6 Complete the sentences with an -ing form
from the box.

go to exercise 3.6

play study listen go live watch

present simple (he / she / it)
positive
He / She lives here.
It starts today.

negative
He / She doesn’t work in the bank.
It doesn’t stop here.
(doesn’t = does not)

questions
Does he / she speak English?
Does it go to Oxford?

short answers
Yes, he / she does.
No, it doesn’t.

spelling
He works, She listens
He goes, She watches, It does
She studies
He has NOT he haves

notes
+s
+es
verb with one consonant +y M ies

go to exercises 3.7 and 3.8

example Do you like playing
1
2
3
4
5

We hate
I like
I really like
I like
Do you like

tennis?

TV.
to music in the car.
English.
out at the weekend.
in the city?

3.7 Change the sentences to she.
example I work on Saturday.
She works on Saturday.
1
2
3
4
5

I
I
I
I
I

never watch videos.
do a lot of work in the mornings.
study German.
go there a lot.
walk to work.

3.8 Complete the sentences with words from
the box. Then make them negative.

Germany wine fish tennis German books
example He reads books.
He doesn’t read books.
1
2
3
4
5

She lives in
He eats
She plays
He speaks
She drinks

.
.
.
.
.

Photocopiable © Oxford
University
Press 2006
language
reference
133


four
present simple with frequency adverbs
Frequency adverbs (always, usually, often, sometimes, hardly ever, never)
tell us how often something happens. They usually go:
after the verb be:

I am often here on Saturday.

He is always late.
after auxiliary verbs:

I don’t usually see them.

He can never get to school early.

before full verbs:

She often sleeps in the afternoon.

I sometimes work at the weekend.

cover & check exercises
4.1 Order the words to make sentences.
example often / works / late / he
He often works late.
1
2
3
4

tired / is / always / she
home / eight / usually / at / I / leave
listens / hardly ever / she / music / to
don’t / Saturday / usually / they /
work / on
5 never / home / before / I / six / get

You can use some frequency adverbs at the beginning or the end of a
sentence.

Usually he meets me at the station.

I work at the weekend sometimes.

go to exercise 4.1

possessive adjectives (my, your, etc.)
Possessive adjectives are the same with a singular or plural noun.

my book

my books

Remember:

use his when a man has something

I often see Mr Collins and his dog.
subject
I
You
He
She
It
We
They

use her when a woman has something

I never see Maria and her brother.

possessive adjective
my sister
your book
his car
her brother
its name NOT it’s name
our flat
their garden

possessive pronoun
This is mine.
This is yours.
This is his.
This is hers.

dictionaries in
1 We can use
class.
passport
2 I don’t know
number. Do you know
number?
3 Barbara often forgets
books.
4 Do you know Michael and
sister?
5 It’s a lovely dog, but I don’t know
name.
6 I want to wash
hair
tonight.
7 They work together. This is
office.
8 Give this to Emma. It’s
homework.
9 I never understand David or
mother.
10 Peter and Angela live over there.
house?
Can you see

This is ours.
This is theirs.

go to exercise 4.2 (go to the workbook, unit 7, for more information and
exercises on possessive pronouns)

Photocopiable
Oxford University Press 2006
134
language© reference

4.2 Complete the sentences with a
possessive adjective.
example They never use their car.

Cover the grammar, then do
the exercise. Check the grammar
again to help you.


five
cover & check exercises

countable and uncountable nouns
countable nouns

5.1 Complete the table with words from
the box.

Countable nouns [C] are singular or plural.

orange apples coffee milk sausages
cheese ham cornflakes apple butter
egg toast rolls sandwich jam

a book

some books

a sandwich

[C] Singular

[C] Plural

[U] Uncountable

orange

apples

coffee

two sandwiches

uncountable nouns
Uncountable nouns [U] are usually only singular.
You can’t count bread, sugar, etc. in English. NOT one bread, two breads

5.2 Write a / an or some.
example I’ve got some

(some) bread
(some) jam
NOT breads/ a bread

(some) sugar

(some) milk

You can say:

a piece of bread / cake

a cup of tea / coffee

Would you like
cup of tea?
I want
apples.
I’ve got
piece of cake.
I’d like
toast, please.
Would you like
apple or
orange?

a glass of milk / juice
5.3 Circle the correct word.
example I’ve got a / any student’s book.

natural English coffee / a coffee
Normally coffee / beer are uncountable. In conversation, you can say
a coffee = a cup of coffee.

Have you got any coffee? = a packet of coffee
Would you like a coffee? = a cup of coffee
Can I have two beers, please? = two bottles or glasses of beer
go to exercises 5.1 and 5.2

some / any
positive
I’ve got ...
singular
a sandwich.
plural / countable
some rolls.
uncountable
some ham.

1
2
3
4
5

bread.

negative
I haven’t got ...
a sandwich.
any rolls.
any ham.

questions
Have you got ...
a sandwich?
any rolls?
any ham?

1 Have you got a / any bread?
2 We haven’t got some / any pasta.
3 I usually have some / any toast for
breakfast.
4 Has he got some / any brothers or
sisters?
5 Do you want an / any apples?
6 I want some / any jam.
7 Would you like a / some ham
sandwich?
8 I don’t eat some / any butter.
9 Do you read some / any newspapers
at the weekend?
10 I never buy a / any coffee.

go to exercise 5.3

Photocopiable © Oxford
University
Press 2006
language
reference
135


5.4 Write can or can’t in the correct place.

can / can’t + verb (possibility)

can’t

Can is the same in all forms: I / you / he / she can (go).

example You buy books in a bar.

can = it’s possible

1 What you eat or drink here?
2 You help me, please?
3 They understand you because they
don’t speak your language.
4 A She give you $100?
B No, she.
5 He work on Saturday because he
always plays football, but he work
on Sunday.

can’t = it’s not possible

Remember you can use can for requests (see p.19):

Can I borrow your pen?

Can you open the window, please?

positive
You can /k@n/ buy books here.
NOT You can to buy

negative
You can’t /kA;nt/ buy bread here.
(can’t = cannot)

questions
Can /k@n/ you buy wine there?

short answers
Yes, you can. /k&n/
No, you can’t. /kA;nt/

go to exercise 5.4

six
cover & check exercises

past simple of be was / were
positive
negative
I / He / She / It was
I / He / She / It wasn’t
there yesterday.
there yesterday.
You / We
were
You / We
weren’t
(wasn’t = was not; weren’t = were not)
questions
short answers
Was I / he / she /it
Yes, I / he / she / it
there yesterday?
Were you / we
No, you / we
Yes,
No, we / you

was.
wasn’t.
were.
weren’t.

go to exercises 6.1 and 6.2

past simple (1) regular and irregular verbs
Use the past simple for things that started and finished in the past.

went to live
in London

past 1998

2002

I lived in Paris in 1998. (I don’t live there now.)
She went to the cinema yesterday.

Photocopiable
© Oxford
University Press 2006
136 language
reference

X
now

6.1 Write was or were.
1 We
very tired yesterday.
2 It
a beautiful day.
3 The people in the hotel
all
French.
4 I liked the people at the party. They
very nice.
5 Susan
at work all day on
Saturday.
6
you at home last night?
7 The bread
cheap but the
apples
very expensive.
8 My father
a doctor, but he
doesn’t work now.
9 What time
the first lesson
this morning?
10
your sisters at school in
1990?
6.2 Put the words in the correct order.
1 wasn’t / Lucy / at / happy / very /
school
2 late / class / we / for / this /
morning / weren’t
3 the / but / was / the / weren’t /
friendly / nice / waiters / food
4 film / interesting / wasn’t / the / very
5 in / weren’t / class / yesterday /
why / you?


regular verbs
I / You / He / She / It / We / They

liked it.
worked there.

spelling
most regular verbs

add -ed

verbs ending in -e

add –d

verbs ending in consonant -y

change -y to -i,
and add -ed
double the consonant

most verbs ending in one vowel
+one consonant
(but not verbs ending in -y, -w,
or an unstressed vowel, e.g.
open, visit )

clean / cleaned
watch / watched
like / liked
decide / decided
study / studied
marry / married
stop / stopped
plan / planned
play / played
open / opened

6.3 Write the sentences in the past.
1 I work in a bank.
I
in a bank last year.
2 They play basketball on Fridays.
They
basketball last Friday.
3 My father lives in Rome.
My father
in Rome when
he was young.
4 We study English at school.
We
English at school.
5 She likes Michael’s brother.
She
Michael’s brother.
6.4 Correct one error in each sentence.

went
example We go to the cinema last night.
1 I meet her brother last year.
2 He has eggs for breakfast this
morning.
3 I think João was at home, but he
wasn’t.
4 She gets up at 9.00 this morning, so
she was late for work.
5 I see him at the party last week.

irregular verbs
Many verbs are irregular in the past.
go to the irregular verb list on p.158
go to exercises 6.3 and 6.4

seven
past simple (2) negative
negative form
I / You / He / She / It / We / They

didn’t go last night. NOT I didn’t went
didn’t stay there.
(didn’t = did not)

go to exercise 7.1

past simple (3) questions
questions
Did you / he / she / they go there?
Why did you stay at that hotel?
short answers
Yes, I / you (etc.) did.
No, I / you (etc.) didn’t.
go to exercise 7.2

NOT Did you went there?

cover & check exercises
7.1 Make the sentences negative.
example She lived in Japan.
She didn’t live in Japan.
1
2
3
4
5

They took the bus home.
She got married last year.
He left home when he was eighteen.
I grew up in Switzerland.
I studied German at school.

7.2 Complete the questions with a verb.
example A What did you have
for
dinner last night?
B Steak. It was great.
1 A
B
2 A
B
3 A
B
4 A
B
5 A
B

Where
on holiday?
To Rimini – it was lovely.
your boyfriend?
When
In September, at a party.
TV last night?
No, I didn’t. I did my homework.
How long
for IBM?
Three years. I left in 2002.
Why
the car?
Because it was very dirty.

Photocopiable © Oxford
University
Press 2006
language
reference
137


zero article
When you talk about people / things in general, you don’t normally use
the with plural nouns or uncountable nouns.

Teachers work long hours.
= teachers in general
Mobile phones are very useful.

NOT The teachers work long hours.

go to exercise 7.3

7.3 Make sentences using a word / phrase
from each column.
example
Shop assistants don’t get a lot of money.
Shop assistants
Dictionaries
Eggs
Museums
People
Children

go shopping
are nice
start school
don’t get
aren’t open
are

at five.
a lot of money.
at the weekend.
very useful.
for breakfast.
in the evening.

object pronouns
7.4 Circle the correct answer.
example Did you see she / her
yesterday?

Object pronouns replace nouns.

That’s John – do you know John him?
Do you like this picture? I bought the picture it at the market.
subject pronoun
I
You
He
lived there.
She
It
We
They

She knows

object pronoun
me.
you.
him.
her.
it.
us.
them.

1
2
3
4
5

He told I / me the answer.
I saw he / him in the bank yesterday.
Our aunt took we / us to the cinema.
Did you ask she / her for the money?
Why did you give they / them your
books?

go to exercise 7.4

eight
cover & check exercises

how much / many?
You use:
how much with singular uncountable nouns;
how many with plural countable nouns.

uncountable
How much money have you got?
How much bread do you want?

countable
How many pens have you got?
How many languages do you speak?

In the answers, you often use not much with uncountable nouns, and not
many with countable nouns.
How much money is there?
A lot.

Quite a lot.

Not much.

None.

How many books do you need?
A lot.

Quite a lot.

Not many.

go to exercise 8.1

Photocopiable
© Oxford
University Press 2006
138
language
reference

None.

8.1 Write How much? or How many?
example I’ve got some bread in the
house. How much?
1 She speaks a lot of different
languages.
2 We used a lot of petrol.
3 We need some more water.
4 I’ve got some oranges.
5 Rachel spent the money.
6 I bought some tea.
7 We met some people.
8 He’s got quite a lot of pasta.
9 I sold the books.
10 She had some homework to do.


8.2 Complete the sentences with a phrase from
the box.

there is / are
You use there is and there are to say that something or someone exists.

There’s a cinema near my house. There are some shops in the village.
There’s a table in the kitchen.
There aren’t any dictionaries in the classroom.

There are some
There’s an
Is there any

You often use these structures before a / an, some and any.

example

nouns
positive
negative
questions
singular countable There’s a table.
There isn’t a window. Is there a key?
uncountable
There’s some food. There isn’t any bread. Is there any
ham?
plural
There are some
There aren’t any
Are there any
chairs.
people.
books?

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

go to exercise 8.2

There’s a
There’s some
There isn’t any Is there a
Are there any Is there a

There’s some food on the table.
park five minutes from here.
milk in the fridge?
e-mail for you.
apples on the tree?
dictionaries in the classroom.
table in that room?
dog in the garden?
fruit.

nine
have to / don’t have to / do I have to ...?
You use have to when something is necessary:

9.1 Match rules a and b with examples 1 to 5.
a = it’s necessary b = it’s not necessary

You have to go to school when you are a child.
You use don’t have to when something is not necessary,:

You don’t have to do homework every evening (but you can if you want).
positive
I / You / We / They
He / She / It

have to go.
has to go.

negative
I / You / We / They
He / She / It

cover & check exercises

don’t have to go.
doesn’t have to go.

questions
short answers
Do I / you / we / they have to go? Yes, I / you / we / they do.
No, I / you / we / they don’t.
Does he / she / it
have to go? Yes, he / she / it
does.
No, he / she / it
doesn’t.
go to exercises 9.1 and 9.2

can / can’t + verb (permission)
For form, see unit five on p.136.
You can use can / can’t + verb to say something is or isn’t permitted.

In most restaurants, you can drink wine. = it’s OK, it’s permitted
In most schools, you can’t drink alcohol. = it’s not OK, it’s not permitted
Compare:

You can go now. = it’s OK to go
You can’t go now. = it’s not OK, it’s not permitted
You have to go now. = it’s necessary to go
You don’t have to go now. = it’s not necessary, but you can go if you want to

1 You have to work late tomorrow.
2 They don’t have to study French, but they
like it.
3 He doesn’t have to work; he’s got lots of
money.
4 We have to study tonight – we’ve got a test
tomorrow.
5 She doesn’t have to do any homework for
her English class.
9.2 Complete the sentences about restaurants
with the correct form of have to.
1 In a café, you
pay the bill.
2 You
drink wine.
3 The waiter
serve your food.
4 The waiter
cook the food.
5 You
clean the table.
9.3 Tick ✓ the correct sentences. Correct the
other sentences.
to
examples We don’t have work tomorrow; it’s
Sunday. ✗
Can we go out tonight? ✓
1 You have to listen to the teacher.
2 Can I to pay you tomorrow? I haven’t got
any money.
3 You have to buy tea – we’ve got a lot.
4 He can go to the bank now – it’s shut.
5 She don’t have to work today.

go to exercise 9.3
Photocopiable © Oxford
University
Press 2006
language
reference
139


ten
can / can’t (ability)
For form, see unit five on p.136.
You can use can / can’t + verb to talk about ability.

I can swim.
Can you use a computer?

I can’t drive.
Can she play the piano?

cover & check exercises
10.1 Write five sentences about things Boris
can and can’t do very well.
example 1 Boris can’t swim very well.
1

Boris

2

3

5

6

Remember you can use can for requests (see unit two, p.19), for
possibility (see unit five, p.136), and for permission (see unit nine, p.139).
go to exercise 10.1
4

Hello, how
are you?

something, anything, nothing, etc.
These mean the same:
1
2
3
4
5

someone = somebody
no one = nobody
anyone = anybody
Remember:

He said nothing. = He didn’t say anything.
NOT He said anything. or He didn’t say nothing.
people
things

positive
Someone told me.
Somebody
Something happened.

negative
questions
No one came to class. Did anyone come?
Nobody
anybody
Nothing happened.
Did anything happen?

go to exercises 10.2 and 10.3

natural English everyone
Everyone and everybody mean the same. Notice the singular verb after
everyone (has, knows, etc.).

Everyone has a mobile now. NOT all people have…
She knows everyone. NOT she knows all people
I think everyone agreed with her.
go to exercise 10.4

10.2 Change the sentences using anything.
example I spent nothing.
I didn’t spend anything.
1
2
3
4
5

He did nothing.
We bought nothing.
I saw nothing.
She drank nothing.
He told her nothing.

10.3 Complete the questions and answers.
example Did you see anyone ?
No, no one .
1 Did he say
2 Do you know
.
No,
3 Did she do
.
4 Did you phone
.
5 Do you read
.

? No,
.
in the class?
yesterday? No,
? No,
in English? No,

10.4 Answer the questions using everyone, as
in the example.
example Do they like it?
Yes, everyone likes it.
1
2
3
4
5
Photocopiable
© Oxford
University Press 2006
140 language
reference

Do they know her?
Did you go out yesterday?
Do they have tickets?
Did they see the film?
Did you speak to her?


eleven
comparative adjectives

cover & check exercises

You use comparative adjectives with than /D@n/ to compare people / things.

Bill

Tom

Tom’s younger than Bill.
Bill’s older than Tom.

Hotels are more expensive than youth hostels.
Youth hostels are less* expensive than hotels.

* more is the opposite of less.
Remember: use than, not that with comparatives.

He’s taller that than me.
One-syllable adjectives and some two-syllable adjectives:

adjective
cheap
safe
big

comparative
cheaper (than)
safer
bigger

easy

easier

notes
+er
+r
short adjectives ending in 1 vowel + 1 consonant:
double the consonant + -er
change -y to -i +er

Many two-syllable adjectives, e.g. useful, polite and longer adjectives:

adjective
tired
boring
expensive
difficult

comparative
more tired (than)
more boring
more expensive
more difficult

notes
-ed adjectives: use more
-ing adjectives: use more

Irregular forms:

adjective
good
bad

11.1 Correct the errors. Be careful! Some
forms are correct.
example tired – tireder than more tired
than
bad – worse than ✓
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

small – smaller that
hot – hoter than
friendly – friendlyer than
fast – faster than
good – more good than
practical – more practical than
cheap – more cheap than
big – biger than
tall – more taller than
noisy – more noisy than

11.2 Write sentences using the key words.
example my car / fast / your car
My car’s faster than your car.
1
2
3
4
5

Jim / nice / David
Tokyo / expensive / Paris
Water / good for you / coffee
Africa / big / South America
In cities, flats / common / houses

When you’ve finished
an exercise, say the
sentences aloud.

comparative
better (than)
worse (than)

go to exercises 11.1 and 11.2

superlative adjectives
You use superlatives to compare people / things with all of their group.
Use the with superlatives.

In my family, Uncle Jack’s the oldest person, and Davina’s the youngest.
Erica’s the most intelligent person, and my brother Don is the most practical.
One-syllable adjectives and some two-syllable adjectives:

adjective
cheap
safe
big

comparative
cheaper (than)
safer (than)
bigger (than)

superlative
the cheapest
the safest
the biggest

easy

easier (than)

the easiest

notes
+est
+st short adjectives ending in 1 vowel
short adjectives ending in 1 consonant:
double the consonant + -est
ending in –y: change -y to -i +est

11.3 Order the words to make sentences.
Begin with the word in bold.
example book / in / the / exercise /
difficult / This / most / is / the
This is the most difficult exercise in
the book.
1 in / shop / most / picture / bought /
the / She / the/ expensive
2 of / the / I / part / city / in /
cheapest / the / live
3 It / the / part / dangerous / the /
town / most / is / of
4 shoes / shop / bought / in / most /
He / the / comfortable / the
5 Caroline / school / the / girl / in /
our / most / beautiful / was
Photocopiable © Oxford
University
Press 2006
language
reference
141


Many two-syllable adjectives, e.g useful, polite, and longer adjectives:

adjective
tired
boring
expensive
difficult

comparative
more tired
more boring
more expensive
more difficult

superlative
notes
the most tired
-ed adjectives: use the most
-ing adjectives: use the most
the most boring
the most expensive
the most difficult

Irregular forms:

adjective comparative
good
better
bad
worse

superlative
the best
the worst

go to exercises 11.3 and 11.4

11.4 Complete the sentences with the
correct superlative form.
example She lives in the nicest
(nice)
part of the city.
1 Which is
(good) way to
get to the station?
2 Is that
(expensive) bar in
town?
3 Where is
(near) coffee
bar?
4 That’s
(bad) place to stay.
It’s very noisy.
5 Which is
(important)
building in town?
11.5 Complete the sentences with verbs
from the box.

should + verb
You can use should to recommend (= tell people what you think is good
for them to do).

go

watch

stay

go

take

visit

You should go to Green Park – it’s lovely. NOT You should to go ...
You should see that film – it’s excellent.

example You should stay
at the
Carlton Hotel – it’s wonderful.

positive
I / You / He / She /
It / We / They

1 You should
and see that
new Spanish film. It’s very good.
2 You should
the Taj Mahal
when you’re in India.
3 You should
to the Picasso
Museum. It’s really interesting.
4 You should
Sky News. It’s
on 24 hours a day.
5 You should
the train to
Venice. It’s a terrific journey.

should do it.

questions
Should we go and see that film?

negative
I / You / He / She /
It / We / They
short answers
Yes, you should.
No, you shouldn’t.

go to exercise 11.5

shouldn’t do it.

twelve
present continuous

cover & check exercises

You use the present continuous:
1 to say what is happening now (at this moment):

past

now

My brother is doing his homework at the moment.
I can’t phone my boss. He’s driving to Manchester.

Photocopiable
© Oxford
University Press 2006
142 language
reference

12.1 Write the -ing form
6
1 leave
2 do
7
3 watch
8
9
4 make
5 wait
10

of these verbs.
put
start
stop
write
sleep

Make a note of any
differences between this
grammar and your
language.


2 to say what is happening around now (for a short period):

12.2 Correct the errors. Use the present
continuous.

isn’t
example He not doing the exercise.

T H I S

W E E K

I’m staying with my aunt and uncle. (e.g. this week)
She’s looking after their dog for a few days.
positive
negative
I’m
studying.
I’m not
staying.
He / She / It’s
working.
He / She / It isn’t
working.
You / We / They’re eating.
You / We / They aren’t staying.
questions
Am I
working?
Is he / she
listening?
Are you / we / they waiting?

short answers
Yes, I am. / No, I’m not.
Yes, he / she is. / No, he / she isn’t.
Yes, you / we / they are.
No, you / we they aren’t.

spelling
go going
say saying
drink drinking
BUT
smoke smoking
drive driving live living
swim swimming
run running sit sitting
vowel + consonant: double the consonant)
go to exercises 12.1, 12.2, and 12.3

present simple vs present continuous
You use the present simple:
1 to talk about things that are always true, or true for a long time.

I come from England.
She works in a school.
They don’t live here.
2 to talk about things you often do or don’t do.

I walk to school most days.
They don’t read a newspaper every day.
For use of the present continuous, see above.
Compare:

He wears jeans every day, but today he’s wearing a suit.
He often wears jeans but he’s wearing a suit at the moment.
He usually works in his office, but today he’s working at home.
go to exercise 12.4

1
2
3
4
5

Where are you live now?
I don’t working today.
They are siting in the kitchen.
He not having lunch.
They aren’t study at the moment.

12.3 Make correct present continuous
sentences.
example What / you / do?
What are you doing?
1
2
3
4
5

What / she / wear / today?
They / have / lunch / now?
I / not work / today.
We / not stay / long.
What / he / do / at the moment?

For a change, do an
exercise orally with
a partner.

12.4 Underline the correct answer.
1 It usually rains / is raining a lot in
England.
2 My brother studies / ’s studying very
hard at the moment.
3 We go / are going to Spain every
year.
4 I never play / am playing football in
the summer.
5 I can’t talk to my mother – she
speaks / ’s speaking to someone on
the phone.
6 Three of the students come from /
are coming from China.
7 What do you do / are you doing at
the moment?
8 My sister always wears / is wearing
jeans at the weekend.
9 A Where’s Carlo?
B He reads / ’s reading something in
the library.
10 My boss speaks / is speaking
Japanese very well. That’s very
unusual for an English person.

Photocopiable © Oxford
University
Press 2006
language
reference
143


thirteen
be going to + verb

cover & check exercises

You use be going to + verb to talk about things you plan to do in the future.

I’m going to buy a flat in the centre.
He’s going to work in Budapest in September.
He’s going to learn Hungarian.

I’m going to buy
that flat.

past
positive
I’m
He / She / It’s
We / You / They’re
questions
Am I
Are we / you / they
Is he / she

now

going to
do it.

the future

negative
I’m
going to
He / She / It isn’t (’s not)
do it.
We / You / They aren’t (’re not)

short answers
Yes, I am. / No, I’m not.
Yes, we / you / they are.
going to do it? No, we / you / they aren’t.
Yes, he / she / it is.
No, he / she / it isn’t.

natural English be going to + go
When you say be going to + go, you don’t have to repeat go.

I’m going to go to the bank this afternoon.
They’re going to go to Japan next year.
Are you going to go to the theatre tonight?
go to exercises 13.1 and 13.2

might + verb
You use might + verb to say that something is possible in the future.

I might go to Poland next summer. (= it’s possible; I’m not sure)
They might stay in a hotel. (= it’s possible; they aren’t sure)
positive
negative
I / You / He / She / It / We / They
I / You / He / She / It / We / They
might go.
might not go.
We don’t usually ask questions with might.
go to exercises 13.3 and 13.4

Photocopiable
© Oxford
University Press 2006
144 language
reference

13.1 Match the sentence halves.
1 Are you
a get a new job?
going to buy
2 What are they
b work next year?
going to
3 When are you
c some milk?
going to
4 Is she going to d do after dinner?
see
5 Where’s David e a film this
going to
evening?
13.2 Correct one error in each sentence.
1 Where’s you going to live next year?
2 What’s he going for do after school?
3 She not going to buy that car.
4 When does Julia going to Romania?
5 I’m no going by car; I can walk.
6 Are they going stay at home tonight?
7 A Are they going work now?
B No, they not.
8 They’re going to get married last year.
9 She going to learn Japanese next year.
10 James and Fred going to the cinema?
13.3 Write A or B against each of the
sentences.
A the person is sure
B the person think’s it’s possible
example We’re going to the bank. A
1
2
3
4
5

I might go out this evening.
She’s not going to study English.
Martha might get married in July.
We might not go on holiday this year.
He’s going to give us a test.

13.4 Put the correct form of be going to or
might.
example I don’t like bananas, so
I ’m not going to buy any.
take
1 It’s raining a lot, so I
an umbrella.
2 My son isn’t sure what he wants to
study economics, or
do. He
perhaps politics.
see the concert on
3 We
Saturday – I‘ve got two tickets.
4 She hasn’t got a watch, so she
be late.
go out, but I’m not sure.
5 I


fourteen
present perfect

cover & check exercises

You use the present perfect to talk about things that have happened in a
time before (or up to) now. Usually we don’t know when these things
happened.

14.1 Write the past participle.
example see seen

I’ve been to Greece.
= before now. We don’t know when.
He’s worked in a restaurant. = before now. We don’t know when.
We often use ever and never with the present perfect.

Have you ever been to Canada? = in your life up to now
I’ve never played basketball. = in my life up to now
Notice the difference between have been to and have gone to.

He has been to France. = Sometime in his life. He isn’t in France now.
He has gone to France. = He went to France and is in France now.
positive
have / has + past participle
I’ve
worked there.
You’ve
We’ve
seen it.
They’ve
He’s
She’s
been there.
It’s

negative
have / has + not + past participle
I
haven’t worked there.
You
We
haven’t studied there.
They
He
hasn’t done it.
She
It

questions
Have you seen ...?
Have they spent ...?
Has she driven ...?
Has it rained ...?

short answers
Yes I have.
No, they haven’t.
Yes, she has.
No, it hasn’t.

For past participles, go to the irregular verb list on p.158
go to exercises 14.1, 14.2 and 14.3

present perfect and past simple
You use the past simple for things that started and finished in the past.
We often know when (or where) these things happened.

I lived in Paris in 1998.

She went to the cinema yesterday.

You use the present perfect for things that have happened before (or up
to) now. Usually, we don’t know when these things happened.
Compare:

I’ve lived in Paris.
I lived in Paris in 1998.
go to exercise 14.4

= before now, we don’t know when
= we know when, so you use the past simple

1
2
3
4
5

eat
live
leave
go
run

6
7
8
9
10

do
make
break
drink
forget

14.2 Make present perfect questions from
the words.
example he / ever / work / abroad
Has he ever worked abroad?
1 she / be / to South America
2 he / ever / stay / in an expensive
hotel
3 she / ever / break / her leg
4 he / read / many books in English
5 she / ever / write / a short story
14.3 Complete the dialogues.
1 A
you ever
(work) in Japan?
B No, I
, but I’d like to.
she ever
2 A
(break) her arm?
B Yes, she
, but it was a
long time ago.
he ever
3 A
(make) bread at home?
B No, he
, but there’s
always a first time.
(eat)
4 A
you
Thai food?
B Yes, I
. It’s fantastic.
(drive)
5 A
they
in America before?
B Yes, I think they
14.4 Circle the correct form.
example I went / have been to
Germany last year.
1 She met / has met my uncle before.
2 Did you go / Have you been to the
cinema last night?
3 What did you do / have you done
last weekend?
4 I never met / have never met
anyone famous.
5 They saw / have seen Jon at the
airport yesterday.

Photocopiable © Oxford
University
Press 145
2006
language
reference


language reference key
unit one
1.1

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
1.2 1
2
3
4
5
1.3 1
2
3
4
5
1.4 1
2
3
4
5

’re
isn’t
’m not
aren’t
’s
’re
isn’t
aren’t
’m
’re
isn’t
’re not
’s not
’re not
isn’t
a
an
a
an
a
Is she a business student? No, she isn’t.
Are they from England? Yes, they are.
Is he married? No, he isn’t.
Are you in this class? Yes, I am.
Is she a doctor? Yes, she is.

unit two
2.1

2.2

2.3

2.4

2.5

1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5

’s / has
’ve / have
Has
Have; have
’s / has
’s got
hasn’t got
hasn’t got
’s got
hasn’t got
’s got
’ve got
haven’t got
’ve got
hasn’t got
lessons
countries
passports
classes
businessmen
nationalities
magazines
people
families
boxes
That
This
These
Those
That
is
possessive
is
possessive
has

2.6

1
2
3
4
5

What is that actor’s name?
Have you got Anna’s rubber?
I think the green car is David’s.
When is your mother’s birthday?
B No, it’s Mrs Taylor’s.

unit five
5.1

[C] Singular [C] Plural
apple
sausages
egg
cornflakes
sandwich
rolls

5.2

1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

unit three
3.1

3.2

3.3

3.4

3.5

3.6

3.7

3.8

1 come
2 speak
3 live / work
4 work
5 take
1 Do you come from Spain?
2 Do you speak Spanish and English?
3 Do you live in Madrid?
4 Do you work in an office?
5 Do you take the train to work?
1 I don’t come from Spain.
2 I don’t speak Spanish and English.
3 I don’t live / work in Madrid.
4 I don’t work in an office.
5 I don’t take the train to work.
1–c
2–a
3–d
4–e
5–b
1 When do you leave the flat?
2 How far is it?
3 Why do you play football?
4 Where do you live?
5 How do they get there?
1 watching
2 listening
3 studying
4 going
5 living
1 She never watches videos.
2 She does a lot of work in the mornings.
3 She studies German.
4 She goes there a lot.
5 She walks to work.
1 She doesn’t live in Germany.
2 He doesn’t eat fish.
3 She doesn’t play tennis.
4 He doesn’t speak German.
5 She doesn’t drink wine.

5.3

5.4

5

1
2
3
4
5
4.2 1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

She is always tired.
I usually leave home at eight.
She hardly ever listens to music.
They don’t usually work on Saturday.
I never get home before six.
our
my; your
her
his
its
my
their
her
his
their

a
some
a
some
an; an
Have you got any bread?
We haven’t got any pasta.
I usually have some toast for breakfast.
Has he got any brothers or sisters?
Do you want any apples?
I want some jam.
Would you like a ham sandwich?
I don’t eat any butter.
Do you read any newspapers at the
weekend?
I never buy any coffee.
What can you eat or drink here?
Can you help me, please?
They can’t understand you.
A Can she give you $100?
B No, she can’t.
He can’t work on Saturday, because he
always plays football, but he can work
on Sunday.

unit six
6.1

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
6.2 1
2
3

unit four
4.1

10
1
2
3
4

[U] Uncountable
milk
cheese
ham
butter
toast
jam

6.3

6.4

4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5

were
was
were
were
was
Were
was; were
was
was
Were
Lucy wasn’t very happy at school.
We weren’t late for class this morning.
The food was nice but the waiters
weren’t friendly.
The film wasn’t very interesting.
Why weren’t you in class yesterday?
worked
played
lived
studied
liked
I met her brother last year.
He had eggs for breakfast this morning.
I thought João was at home, but he
wasn’t.
She got up at 9.00 this morning, so she
was late for work.
I saw him at the party last week.

Photocopiable © Oxford University Press 2006


unit seven
7.1

7.2

7.3

7.4

1 They didn’t take the bus home.
2 She didn’t get married last year.
3 He didn’t leave home when he was
eighteen.
4 I didn’t grow up in Switzerland.
5 I didn’t study German at school.
1 did you go
2 did you meet
3 Did you watch
4 did you work
5 did you wash
Dictionaries are very useful.
Eggs are nice for breakfast.
Museums aren’t open in the evening.
People go shopping at the weekend.
Children start school at five.
1 me
2 him
3 us
4 her
5 them

unit eight
8.1

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
8.2 1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

How many?
How much?
How much?
How many?
How much?
How much?
How many?
How much?
How many?
How much?
There’s a
Is there any
There’s an
Are there any
There are some
Is there a
Is there a
There isn’t any

unit nine
9.1

9.2

9.3

1–a
2–b
3–b
4–a
5–b
1 have to
2 don’t have to
3 has to
4 doesn’t have to
5 don’t have to
1 correct
2 Can I to pay you tomorrow?
3 You don’t have to buy tea.
4 He can’t go to the bank now.
5 She doesn’t have to work today.

unit ten
10.1 2
3
4
5
6

He can run very well.
He can’t sing very well.
He can play the guitar very well.
He can’t play chess very well.
He can speak English very well.

unit ten
10.2 1
2
3
4
5
10.3 1
2
3
4
5
10.4 1
2
3
4
5

He didn’t do anything.
We didn’t buy anything.
I didn’t see anything.
She didn’t drink anything.
He didn’t tell her anything.
anything; nothing
anyone; no one
anything; nothing
anyone; no one
anything; nothing
Yes, everyone knows her.
Yes, everyone went out yesterday.
Yes, everyone has tickets.
Yes, everyone saw the film.
Yes, everyone spoke to her.

unit eleven
11.1 1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11.2 1
2
3
4
5
11.3 1
2
3
4
5
11.4 1
2
3
4
5
11.5 1
2
3
4
5

smaller than
hotter than
friendlier than
correct
better than
correct
cheaper than
bigger than
taller than
noisier than
Jim’s nicer than David.
Tokyo’s more expensive than Paris.
Water’s better for you than coffee.
Africa’s bigger than South America.
In cities, flats are more common than
houses.
She bought the most expensive picture
in the shop.
I live in the cheapest part of the city.
It’s the most dangerous part of the town.
He bought the most comfortable shoes
in the shop.
Caroline was the most beautiful girl in
our school.
the best
the most expensive
the nearest
the worst
the most important
go
visit
go
watch
take

unit twelve
12.1 1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
12.2 1
2
3
4
4

Photocopiable © Oxford University Press 2006

leaving
doing
watching
making
waiting
putting
starting
stopping
writing
sleeping
Where are you living now?
I’m not working today.
They are sitting in the kitchen.
He isn’t having lunch.
They aren’t studying at the moment.

12.3 1
2
3
4
5
12.4 1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

What’s she wearing today?
Are they having lunch now?
I’m not working today.
We’re not / We aren’t staying long.
What’s he doing at the moment?
rains
’s studying
go
play
’s speaking
come from
are you doing
wears
’s reading
speaks

unit thirteen
13.1 1 – c
2–d
3–a
4–e
5–b
13.2 1 Where are you going to live next year?
2 What’s he going to do after school?
3 She’s not / She isn’t going to buy that
car.
4 When’s / is Julia going to Romania?
5 I’m not going to go by car.
6 Are they going to stay at home
tonight?
7 Are they going to work now?
B No, they’re not/ they aren’t.
8 They’re going to get married next year.
9 She’s / is going to learn Japanese next
year.
10 Are James and Fred going to the cinema?
13.3 1 – b
2–a
3–b
4–b
5–a
13.4 1 ’m going to
2 might
3 ’re going to
4 might
5 might

unit fourteen
14.1 1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
14.2 1
2

eaten
lived
left
gone
run
done
made
broken
drunk
forgotten
Has she been to South America?
Has he ever stayed in an expensive
hotel?
3 Has she ever broken her leg?
4 Has he read many books in English?
5 Has she ever written a short story?


14.3 1 A
B
2 A
B
3
4
5
14.4 1
2
3
4
5

Have you ever worked in Japan?
No, I haven’t, but I’d like to.
Has she ever broken her arm?
Yes, she has, but it was a long time
ago.
A Has he ever made bread at home?
B No, he hasn’t, but there’s always a
first time.
A Have you eaten Thai food?
B Yes, I have. It’s fantastic.
A Have they driven in America before?
B Yes, I think they have.
She has met my uncle before.
Did you go to the cinema last night?
What did you do last weekend?
I have never met anyone famous.
They saw Jon at the airport yesterday.

Photocopiable © Oxford University Press 2006


language reference
one
question forms

cover & check exercises

yes / no questions

1.1 Write questions. Use he.
1 (be) a doctor?
2 (live) with his parents?
3 (have got) a car?
4 (go) to Italy last year?
5 (can understand) German?

Most verbs form questions with do, does, and did.

positive form
I work here.
He livess near here.
It rained yesterday.

question form
Do you work here?
Doees he live near here?
Did it rain yesterday?

In questions with the verb be, put the verb before the subject. In
questions with modal verbs (e.g. can, could), put the modal verb before
the subject. With have got, put have before the subject.

positive form
He is married.
They were tired.
I’ve got a dictionary.
He can come later.
She could help.

question form
Is he married?
Were they tired?
Have you got a dictionary?
Can he come later?
Could she help?

Now write questions using they.
6 (be) married?
7 (have got) any children?
8 (like) skiing?
9 (stay) at home last night?
10 (be) at university in the 1990s?

go to exercise 1.1

wh- questions
With wh- questions, use the same word order as yes / no questions.

Where does he live? = place
When did she get here? = time
Why did they leave? = reason
What’s your name? = a thing
Who’s got my pen? = a person
How old is your baby? = age
How often do you come here? = frequency
How much does it cost? = quantity
What’s it like? = tell me about it
You can end questions with prepositions.

1.2 Here are some answers. Write possible
wh- questions.
1 He’s from the south of Italy.
2 At 7 o’clock this morning.
3 Because he wanted to learn English.
4 Twenty euros.
5 Eighteen – it’s her birthday today.
1.3 Fill the gaps with a verb, question
word, or preposition.
1 Who do they live
?
2
often do you go there?
3 What are they looking
?
4
she at the party last night?
5
’s it like ?

Where do you come from? NOT From where do you come?
Who does she live with?
What are you looking at?
go to exercises 1.2 and 1.3

© Oxford University Press language reference

www.oup.com/elt/naturalenglish


present simple
positive and negative forms
I/You/We/They
live here.
don’t live here.
He/She/It
lives here.
doesn’t live here.
short answers
Yes, I do.
Yes, he does.
No, I don’t.
No, she doesn’t.

questions
Where do you live?
Where does he/she live?

You can use the present simple to talk about things which are
always / generally true:

I come from Italy.
They live in a village.

She doesn’t like chocolate.
Does she speak French?

1.4 Write the verbs in the correct form.
1 We
(not like) sport.
2
(you / watch) TV a lot?
3 My sister
(speak) French.
4 How often
(he go) on
holiday?
5 She
(not drive) to work.

Cover the grammar,
then try the exercise.
Check the grammar
again to help you.

You can also use the present simple to talk about habits:

I go to the shops every week.
She watches TV in the evenings.

Do you often see your parents?
Does he finish work at 6.00?

go to exercise 1.4

possessive ’s / s’
singular nouns: add ’s

Jack’s house

my daughter’s boyfriend

irregular plural nouns: add ’s

the children’s toys

the men’s room

regular plural nouns: add s’

the boys’ bicycles

my friends’ flat

Compare:

the student’s room = a room for one student
the students’ room = a room for more than one student
go to exercise 1.5
You can use possessive ’s / s’ to talk about possessions and relationships.

Maria’s flat
the doctor’s bag

1.5 Make the underlined nouns plural.
1 David found the boy’s books.
2 We went out with my sister’s friends.
3 They forgot the child’s jackets.
4 It was the woman’s idea.
5 My brother’s team lost the match.
1.6 Circle the correct answer.
1 I gave it to Mark’s brother / the
brother of Mark.
2 What’s the film’s name / the name of
the film?
3 Do you know Petra’s husband / the
husband of Petra?
4 That’s my sister’s computer / the
computer of my sister.
5 We live in the country’s middle / the
middle of the country.

Maria’s boyfriend NOT the boyfriend of Maria
my parents’ car

But you normally use of for things and places.

the beginning of the film

the end of the road NOT the road’s end

go to exercise 1.6

www.oup.com/elt/naturalenglish

language reference © Oxford University Press


past simple
positive and negative forms
I/You/He/She/It/We/They worked.
didn’t work. (NOT worked)

questions
Where did you work?
(NOT worked)

short answers
Yes, I did. No, I didn’t.
spelling
most regular verbs

add -ed

verbs ending in -e

add -d

verbs ending in
consonant -y
most verbs ending in one
vowel + one consonant
(but not verbs ending in
-y, -w, or an unstressed
vowel, e.g. open, visit)

change -y to
-i and add -ed
double the
consonant

start – started
look – looked
arrive – arrived
live – lived
marry – married
study – studied
stop – stopped
plan – planned

1.7 Correct the errors. Be careful: two
sentences are correct.
1 When did they returned?
2 She seen him last week.
3 We studyed this grammar yesterday.
4 I didn’t forget her birthday.
5 What time did he left the party?
6 We stoped work at five o’clock.
7 I drived home last night.
8 He putted his coat on.
9 I didn’t write anything.
10 He didn’t went to school today.
1.8 Fill the gaps with one word.
1 I rang him
.
2 I saw them three days
.
3 He went to Spain
month.
4 I started work
1998.
5 She got up
six o’clock.

Many common verbs are irregular in the past:

go – went

see – saw

catch – caught

be – was/were

go to the irregular verb list on p.174
go to exercise 1.7

Is this grammar the same in
your language? If not, make a
note of the difference.

You can use the past simple to talk about something that started and
finished in the past. You often know when it happened.

I worked until ten o’clock last night.

I didn’t see him yesterday.

You can use these time expressions with the past simple.

yesterday

last night/week/month

two weeks ago

in 2001

at 2.30

natural English a sequence of actions
For more than one action with the same subject, you don’t need to repeat
the subject.

He stood up, he went to the door, and he opened it.
go to exercise 1.8

© Oxford University Press language reference

www.oup.com/elt/naturalenglish


Tài liệu bạn tìm kiếm đã sẵn sàng tải về

Tải bản đầy đủ ngay

×
x