Tải bản đầy đủ

Understanding business 11th by mchugh nickels chap019

CHAPTER 19

Using Securities 
Markets for 
Financing & 
Investing 
Opportunities

McGraw-Hill/Irwin

Copyright © 2015 by the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.


LEARNING OBJECTIVES
1. Describe the role of securities markets and of 
investment bankers.
2. Identify the stock exchanges where securities are 
traded.
3. Compare the advantages and disadvantages of equity 
financing by issuing stock, and detail the differences 
between common and preferred stock.

4. Compare the advantages and disadvantages of 
obtaining debt financing by issuing bonds, and identify 
the classes and features of bonds.

19-2


LEARNING OBJECTIVES
5. Explain how to invest in securities markets and set 
investment objectives such as long­term growth, 
income, cash, and protection from inflation.
6. Analyze the opportunities stocks offer as investments.
7. Analyze the opportunities bonds offer as investments.
8. Explain the investment opportunities in mutual funds 
and exchange­traded funds (ETFs).
9. Describe how indicators like the Dow Jones Industrial 
Average affect the market.
19-3


MELODY HOBSON
Ariel Investments

• Hobson started as an intern at 
Ariel Investments after 
graduating from Princeton in 
1991.
• Now, as president of the 
company, she oversees more 
than $9 billion in assets.
• Preaches patience in investing.
• Ariel Investments focuses on 
stocks and equity funds that 
should perform in the long 

19-4


NAME that COMPANY
If someone had bought 100 shares in this company 


when it was first available to the public in 1965, 
it would have cost $2,250. If they held on to the 
stock, the number of shares they’d have today 
would be 74,360 (after 12 stock splits) with a 
value of approximately $7.4 million.
Name that company!

19-5


The BASICS of 
SECURITIES MARKETS

LO 19­1

• Securities markets are 
financial marketplaces for 
stocks and bonds and serve 
two primary functions:
1. Assist businesses in finding 
long­term funding to finance 
capital needs.
2. Provide private investors a 
place to buy and sell 
securities such as stocks and 
bonds.
19-6


TYPES of 
SECURITIES MARKETS

LO 19­1

• Securities markets are divided into primary and 
secondary markets:
- Primary markets handle the sale of new securities. 
- Secondary markets handle the trading of securities 
between investors with the proceeds of the sale going to 
the seller.

• Initial Public Offering (IPO) ­­ The first offering 
of a corporation’s stock.

19-7


INVESTMENT BANKERS 
and INSTITUTIONAL INVESTORS 

LO 19­1

• Investment Bankers ­­ Specialists who assist in 
the issue and sale of new securities.

• Institutional Investors ­­ 

Large organizations such as 
pension funds or mutual funds 
that invest their own funds or 
the funds of others.

19-8


STOCK EXCHANGES

LO 19­1

• Stock Exchange ­­ An organization whose 

members can buy and sell (exchange) securities on 
behalf of companies and individual investors.

• Over­the­Counter (OTC) Market ­­ Provides 

companies and investors with a means to trade stocks 
not listed on the national securities exchanges.

• NASDAQ ­­ A telecommunications network that links 
dealers across the nation so they can exchange 
securities electronically. 

19-9


TOP STOCK EXCHANGES

LO 19­1

• NYSE Euronext
• NASDAQ
• London Stock 
Exchange
• Tokyo Stock Exchange
• Deutsche Borse
19-10


GIVING SMALL BUSINESS 
a JUMP on FUNDING
• The goal of the JOBS Act is to ease small 
business financing problems.
• The SEC adopted new rules, including:
- Raised from 500 to 2,000 the number of shareholders 
a company could have before it must register its stock 
with the SEC.
- Allows equity crowdfunding through brokers or portals.
- Expanded the abilities of private companies to raise 
capital through limited stock offerings.
19-11


The SECURITIES and 
EXCHANGE COMMISSION

LO 19­2

• Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) ­­ 
The federal agency responsible for regulating the 
various stock exchanges; created in 1934 through the 
Securities and Exchange Act.

• Prospectus ­­ A condensed version of economic 

and financial information that a company must file with 
the SEC before issuing stock; the prospectus must be 
sent to prospective investors.

19-12


TEST PREP

• What is the primary purpose of a securities 
exchange?
• What does NASDAQ stand for? How does this 
exchange work?

19-13


LEARNING the 
LANGUAGE of STOCKS

LO 19­3

• Stocks ­­ Shares of 

ownership in a company.

• Stock Certificate ­­ 

Evidence of stock ownership.

• Dividends ­­ Part of a firm’s 
profits that the firm may 
distribute to stockholders as 
either cash or additional 
shares.

19-14


ADVANTAGES of 
ISSUING STOCK

LO 19­3

• Stockholders are owners 
of a firm and never have to 
be repaid their investment.
• There is no legal obligation 
to pay dividends.
• Issuing stock can improve 
a firm’s balance sheet 
since stock creates no 
debt.
19-15


DISADVANTAGES of 
ISSUING STOCK

LO 19­3

• Stockholders have the right to vote for a 
company’s board of directors.
• Issuing new shares of stock can alter the control 
of the firm.
• Dividends are paid from after­tax profits and are 
not tax deductible.
• The need to keep stockholders happy can affect 
management’s decisions.

19-16


TWO CLASSES of STOCK

LO 19­3

• Common Stock ­­ The most basic form; holders 

have the right to vote for the board of directors and 
share in the profits if dividends are approved.

• Preferred Stock ­­ Owners are given preference in 
the payment of company dividends before common 
stock dividends are distributed. Preferred stock can 
also be:
- Callable
- Convertible
- Cumulative

19-17


TEST PREP
• Name at least two advantages and disadvantages 
of a company’s issuing stock as a form of equity 
financing.
• What are the major differences between common 
stock and preferred stock?

19-18


LEARNING the 
LANGUAGE of BONDS

LO 19­4

• Bond ­­ A corporate certificate indicating that an 

investor has lent money to a firm (or a government).

• The principal is the face 
value of the bond.
• Interest ­­ The payment the 
bond issuer makes to the 
bondholders to compensate 
them for the use of their 
money.

19-19


TYPES of BONDS

LO 19­4

19-20


ADVANTAGES of 
ISSUING BONDS

LO 19­4

• Bondholders are creditors, not owners of the firm 
and cannot vote on corporate matters.
• Bond interest is tax deductible.
• Bonds are a temporary source of funding and are 
eventually repaid.
• Bonds can be repaid before the maturity date if 
they are callable.
19-21


DISADVANTAGES of 
ISSUING BONDS

LO 19­4

• Bonds increase debt and can affect the market’s 
perception of the firm.
• Paying interest on bonds is a legal obligation.
• If interest is not paid, bondholders can take legal 
action.
• The face value of the bond must be repaid on the 
maturity date.
19-22


BOND RATINGS

LO 19­4

19-23


DIFFERENT CLASSES of 
CORPORATE BONDS

LO 19­4

• Corporations can issue two classes of bonds:
1. Unsecured bonds 
(debenture 
bonds): not 
backed by specific 
collateral.
2. Secured bonds: 
backed by 
collateral (land or 
equipment).
19-24


SPECIAL FEATURES in 
BOND ISSUES

LO 19­4

• Sinking Fund ­­ Reserve account set up to ensure 
that enough money will be available to repay 
bondholders on the maturity date.

• Callable bonds permit bond issuers to pay off the 
principal before the maturity date.
• Convertible bonds allow bondholders to convert 
their bonds into shares of common stock.
19-25


Tài liệu bạn tìm kiếm đã sẵn sàng tải về

Tải bản đầy đủ ngay

×