Tải bản đầy đủ

Understanding business 11th by mchugh nickels chap015

CHAPTER 15

Distributing 
Products

McGraw-Hill/Irwin

Copyright © 2015 by the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.


LEARNING OBJECTIVES

1. Explain the concept of marketing channels and their 
value.
2. Demonstrate how intermediaries perform the six 
marketing utilities.
3. Identify the types of wholesale intermediaries in the 
distribution system.

15-2



LEARNING OBJECTIVES
4. Compare the distribution strategies retailers use.
5. Explain the various kinds of nonstore retailing.
6. Explain the various ways to build cooperation in 
channel systems.
7. Describe logistics and outline how intermediaries 
manage the transportation and storage of goods.
15-3


REED HASTINGS
Netflix

• Almost singlehandedly 
ended the era of brick and 
mortar video rentals.
• In college, Hastings spent 
his summers training with 
the Marines and joined the 
Peace Corps.
• Was inspired to start Netflix 
after racking up a $40 late 
fee.
15-4


NAME that COMPANY

This U.S. company is known for having low prices 
all the time. One way it keeps prices low is by 
eliminating as many wholesalers as possible and 
doing all the wholesale function itself.
Name that company!

15-5


WHAT are MARKETING 
INTERMEDIARIES?



LO 15­1

• Marketing Intermediaries ­­ Organizations that 

assist in moving goods and services from businesses 
to businesses (B2B) and from businesses to 
consumers (B2C).

• They are called intermediaries because they’re in 
the middle of a series of firms that distribute 
goods.

15-6


WHAT are MARKETING 
INTERMEDIARIES?

LO 15­1

• Channel of Distribution ­­ A group of marketing 

intermediaries that joining together to transport and 
store goods from producers to consumers.

15-7


ANSWER MAY BE BLOWING 
in the WIND
• IKEA was looking to cut down on shipping costs 
and to focus on renewable energy.
• It has plans to construct a wind farm in Illinois with 
49 wind turbines to generate electricity for 34,000 
homes.
• Started using paper pallets that weigh 90% less 
than the wood and can be recycled.
• IKEA officials are not satisfied with the new 
pallets already and are looking for a new option. 
15-8


TYPES of MARKETING 
INTERMEDIARIES?

LO 15­1

• Agents and Brokers ­­ Intermediaries who bring 

buyers and sellers together and assist in negotiating 
an exchange but do not take title to the goods.

• Wholesaler ­­ An intermediary that sells products to 
other organizations such as retailers, manufacturers, 
and hospitals.

• Retailer ­­ An organization that sells products to 
ultimate customers.

15-9


SELECTED CHANNELS of 
DISTRIBUTION

LO 15­1

15-10


WHY MARKETING NEEDS 
INTERMEDIARIES

LO 15­1

• Intermediaries perform marketing tasks faster 
and cheaper than most manufacturers could 
provide them.
• Marketing 
intermediaries make 
markets more 
efficient by reducing 
transactions and 
contacts.
15-11


HOW INTERMEDIARIES CREATE 
EXCHANGE EFFICIENCY

LO 15­1

15-12


THREE KEY FACTS ABOUT 
MARKETING INTERMEDIARIES 

LO 15­1

1) Marketing intermediaries can be eliminated but 
their activities cannot.
2) Intermediaries perform marketing functions 
faster and cheaper than other organizations 
can.
3) Marketing intermediaries add costs to products 
but they are generally offset by the values they 
provide.
15-13


DISTRIBUTION’S EFFECT on 
YOUR FOOD DOLLAR

LO 15­1

15-14


INTERMEDIARIES 
CREATE UTILITY

LO 15­2

• Utility ­­ The want­satisfying ability, or value, that 

organizations add to goods and services by making 
them more useful or accessible to consumers.

• Six types of utilities:
1. Form
2. Time
3. Place
4. Possession
5. Information
6. Service 

15-15


HOW MARKETERS USE UTILITY

LO 15­2

• Form Utility ­­ Changes raw materials into useful 
products; producers generally provide form utility.

- Starbucks makes coffee the way the customers want it.
- Dell assembles computers according to customer needs.

• Time Utility ­­ Makes products available when 
customers want them.

- Many Walgreens stores are open 24­hours a day.
- Colleges offer day and evening classes.
15-16


HOW MARKETERS USE UTILITY

LO 15­2

• Place Utility ­­ Adds value to products by placing 
them where people want them.

- Banks place ATMs at convenient locations.
- 7­11 stores are found in easy­to­reach locations.

• Possession Utility ­­ Helps transfer ownership from 
one party to another, including providing credit.
- Pay for lunch at McDonalds with your Visa card.
- A savings and loan office offers loans to home/car 
buyers.
15-17


HOW MARKETERS USE UTILITY

LO 15­2

• Information Utility ­­ Opens two­way flows of 
information between marketing participants.
- Websites offer advice to shoppers.
- Local government maps show tourist locations.

• Service Utility ­­ Provides service during and after a 
sale and teaches customers how to best use 
products.
- Apple offers classes to help computer buyers.
- College placement offices help students find jobs.
15-18


TEST PREP
• What is a channel of distribution and what 
intermediaries participate in it?
• Why do we need intermediaries? Illustrate how 
intermediaries create exchange efficiency.
• How would you defend intermediaries to 
someone who said getting rid of them would save 
consumers millions of dollars?
• Give examples of the utilities intermediaries 
create and how they provide them.

15-19


WHOLESALE INTERMEDIARIES 

LO 15­3

• Wholesalers normally make B2B sales, however, 
stores like Staples and Costco also have retail 
functions.
- Retail sales are sales of goods and services to customers 
for their own use.
- Wholesale sales are sales of goods and services to other 
businesses for use in the business or resale.

• Consumers are more familiar with retailers 
than wholesalers. 
15-20


TYPES of WHOLESALE 
INTERMEDIARIES 

LO 15­3

• Merchant Wholesalers ­­ Independently owned 

firms that take title to the goods they handle. There 
are two types:
1. Full­service wholesalers perform all distribution 
functions.
2. Limited­function wholesalers perform only selected 
distribution functions.

15-21


TYPES of LIMITED­FUNCTION 
WHOLESALERS

LO 15­3

• Rack Jobbers ­­ Furnish racks or shelves of 

merchandise such as music and magazines for 
retailers for display and sell them on consignment.

• Cash­and­Carry Wholesalers ­­ Serve mostly 
smaller retailers with a limited assortment of 
products.

• Drop Shippers ­­ Take orders from retailers and 

other wholesalers and have the merchandise shipped 
from producer to buyer.
15-22


ROLES of AGENTS 
and BROKERS

LO 15­3

• Agents generally maintain long­term relationships 
with the clients they represent.
- Manufacturer’s agents 
represent several 
manufacturers in a specific 
territory.
- Sales agents represent a 
single client in a larger territory. 

• Brokers usually represent 
clients on a temporary 
basis.

15-23


RETAILING in the U.S.

LO 15­4

• There are over 2 million retailers in the U.S., not 
including websites.
• Retailers in the U.S. 
employ about 5 million 
people and operate 
under many different 
structures.

15-24


TRUCKIN’ ON 
with SOCIAL MEDIA
• Today, over 3 million trucks cruise around the 
U.S. with lots of specialty items. 
• The food truck craze hit around the same time as 
Twitter and Facebook blew up.
• Social media sites and food truck­specific apps 
help link up hungry mouths with the nearest 
trucks.

15-25


Tài liệu bạn tìm kiếm đã sẵn sàng tải về

Tải bản đầy đủ ngay

×