Tải bản đầy đủ

Understanding business 11th by mchugh nickels chap009

CHAPTER 9

Production 
and 
Operations 
Management

McGraw-Hill/Irwin

Copyright © 2015 by the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.


LEARNING OBJECTIVES
1. Describe the current state of U.S. manufacturing and 
what manufacturers have done to become more 
competitive.
2. Describe the evolution from production to operations 
management.
3. Identify various production processes and describe 
techniques that improve productivity, including 
computer­aided design and manufacturing, flexible 

manufacturing, lean manufacturing and mass 
customization. 
9-2


LEARNING OBJECTIVES

4. Describe operations management planning issues 
including facility location, facility layout, materials 
requirement planning, purchasing, just­in­time 
inventory control and quality control.
5. Explain the use of PERT and Gantt charts to control 
manufacturing processes.

9-3


SHAHID KHAN
Flex­N­Gate

• Moved from Pakistan to the 
U.S. at the age of 16.
• After college, he got a job 
overseeing Flex­N­Gate.
• Bought the company after two 
years and refined the 
production process
• Now the company brings in 
over $3 billion in sales each 
year.

9-4


NAME that COMPANY
Operations management in this hotel company 
includes restaurants that offer the finest in 
service, elevators that run smoothly, and a front 
desk that processes people quickly. It may 
include fresh­cut flowers in the lobbies and 


dishes of fruit in every room.
Name that company!
9-5


MANUFACTURING in the U.S.

LO 9­1

• Some areas in the U.S. 
are experiencing 
economic growth while 
others are declining.
• Manufacturing in the 
U.S. is so productive 
fewer workers are 
needed.
9-6


WHAT’S MADE in the USA?

LO 9­1

Leading U.S. Manufactured Goods

Source: Parade Magazine, www.parade.com, accessed November 2014.

9-7


MASSIVE MANUFACTURERS

LO 9­1

The Top Ten U.S. Manufacturers

Source: Industry Week, www.industryweek.com, accessed November 2014.

9-8


YOUR OWN FARM in a BOX
• Freight Farms was developed after the founders 
were unsatisfied with rooftop greenhouses.
• Each container is 320­square­feet and can 
produce 900 heads of leafy greens each week.
• The company works with small and medium­
sized food distributers so local food can be 
enjoyed year round.

9-9


TOP­PAYING SERVICE JOBS

LO 9­1

• The U.S. economy is no longer manufacturing 
based.
• 85% of jobs are in the service sector.
• The top­paying service jobs in the U.S. are in:
- Legal services
- Medical services
- Entertainment
- Accounting
- Finance
- Management consulting 

9-10


REMAINING COMPETITIVE in 
GLOBAL MARKETS

LO 9­1

• U.S. is still the leader in nanotechnology and 
biotechnology.
• How can U.S. businesses maintain a competitive 
edge?
-

Focusing on customers

-

Maintaining close relationships with suppliers

-

Practicing continuous improvement

-

Focusing on quality

-

Saving on costs through site selection

-

Relying on the Internet to unite companies

-

Adopting new production techniques

9-11


NOBODY DOES IT BETTER
• Germany’s economy is the 
most powerful and 
respected economy in 
Europe.
• Mittlestand companies 
design their own machines 
and production processes.
• China has purchased many 
German firms and are 
studying their production 
techniques.

9-12


PRODUCTION and 
PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT

LO 9­2

• Production ­­ The creation of goods using land, 

labor, capital, entrepreneurship and knowledge (the 
factors of production).

• Production 
Management ­­ All the 

activities managers do to 
help firms create goods.

9-13


OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

LO 9­2

• Operations Management ­­ A specialized area in 
management that converts or transforms resources 
into goods and services.

• Operations management includes:
- Inventory management
- Quality control
- Production scheduling
- Follow­up services
9-14


OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT
in the SERVICE SECTOR

LO 9­2

• All about creating a good experience for those 
who use the service.
• In hotels, like Ritz­
Carlton, operation 
management 
includes fine dining, 
fresh flowers, and 
training for every 
employee.
9-15


THERE’S an APP for THAT

LO 9­2

Top Productivity Apps for iPad

Source: PC Magazine, www.pcmag.com, accessed November 2014.

9-16


TEST PREP

• What have U.S. manufacturers done to regain a 
competitive edge?
• What must U.S. companies do to continue to 
strengthen the country’s manufacturing base?
• What led companies to focus on operations 
management rather than production?

9-17


The PRODUCTION PROCESS

LO 9­3

9-18


FORM UTILITY 

LO 9­3

• Form Utility ­­ The value 

producers add to materials 
in the creation of finished 
goods and services. 

9-19


GROVE’S BASIC PRODUCTION 
REQUIREMENTS

LO 9­3

1. To build and deliver products in response to the 
demands of the customer at the scheduled 
delivery time.
2. To provide an acceptable quality level.
3. To provide everything at the lowest possible 
cost.  

9-20


PROCESS and ASSEMBLY in 
PRODUCTION

LO 9­3

• Process Manufacturing ­­ 
The part of production that 
physically or chemically 
changes materials.

• Assembly Process ­­ The 

part of the production process 
that puts together components.

9-21


KEY PRODUCTION PROCESSES

LO 9­3

• Production processes are either continuous or 
intermittent.
• Continuous Process ­­ Long production runs turn 
out finished goods over time.
• Intermittent Process ­­ Production runs are short 
and the producer adjusts machines frequently to 
make different products.

9-22


MINUTE MADE

LO 9­3

Production of Some of America’s Favorite Products

9-23


DEVELOPMENTS MAKING U.S. 
COMPANIES MORE COMPETITIVE

LO 9­3

1. Computer­aided design 
and manufacturing
2. Flexible manufacturing
3. Lean manufacturing
4. Mass customization

9-24


COMPUTER­AIDED DESIGN and 
MANUFACTURING

LO 9­3

• Computer­Aided Design 
(CAD) ­­ The use of computers 
in the design of products.

• Computer­Aided 
Manufacturing (CAM) ­­ The 
use of computers in the 
manufacturing of products.

9-25


Tài liệu bạn tìm kiếm đã sẵn sàng tải về

Tải bản đầy đủ ngay

×