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Decision support and BI systems ch14

Decision Support and
Business Intelligence
Systems
(9th Ed., Prentice Hall)
Chapter 14:
Management Support
Systems: Emerging Trends
and Impacts


Learning Objectives













14-2

Explore some of the emerging technologies that
may impact MSS
Know how RFID data analysis can help improve
supply-chain management and other operations
Describe how massive data acquisition
techniques can enable reality mining
Describe how virtual-world technologies can be
used for decision support
Describe how virtual-world applications can
result in additional data for BI applications
Describe the potential of cloud computing in
business intelligence

Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall


Learning Objectives










14-3

Understand Web 2.0 and its characteristics as
they relate to MSS
Understand social networking concepts,
selected applications, and their relationship
to BI
Describe organizational impacts of MSS
Learn the potential impacts of MSS on

individuals
Describe societal impacts of MSS
List and describe major ethical and legal
issues of MSS implementation

Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall


Opening Vignette:
“Coca-Cola's RFID-based Dispenser Serves a
New Type of Business Intelligence”

14-4



Company background



Problem description



Proposed solution



Results



Answer and discuss the case questions

Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall


RFID and BI

14-5



Wal-Mart's RFID mandate in June 2003



DoD, Target, Albertson's, Best Buy,…



RFID is a generic technology that refers to the
use of radio frequency waves to identify
objects



RFID is a new member of the automatic
identification technologies family, which also
include the ubiquitous barcodes and magnetic
strips

Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall


How does RFID work?


RFID system –








Tags –


14-6

a tag (an electronic chip attached to
the product to be identified)
an interrogator (i.e., reader) with one
or more antennae attached
a computer (to manage the reader
and store the data captured by the
reader)
Active tag versus Passive tags

Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall


Data Representation for RFID


14-7

RFID tags contain 96 bits of data in the
form of serialized global trade
identification numbers (SGTIN) [see
epcglobalinc.org]

Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall


RFID for Supply Chain BI


RFID in Retail Systems


Functions in a distribution center




receiving, put-away, picking, and shipping

Sequence of operations at a receiving
duck
1.unloading

the contents of the trailer
2.verification of the receipt of goods against
expected delivery (purchase order)
3.documentation of the discrepancy
4.application of labels to the pallets, cases,
items
5.sorting of goods for put-away or cross-dock
14-8

Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall


RFID for Supply Chain BI


14-9

RFID in Retail Systems

Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall


RFID Data Sample


14-10

RFID in Retail Systems

Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall


RFID for BI in Supply Chain


Better SC visibility with RFID systems








14-11

Timing/duration of movements between
different locations – especially important
for products with limited shelf life
Better management of out-of-stock items
(optimal restocking of store shelves)
Help streamline the backroom
operations: eliminate unnecessary case
cycles, reorders
Better analysis of movement timings for
more effective and efficient logistics

Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall


RFID + Sensors for Better BI


14-12

Knowing the location and health of goods
(i.e., exception) during transportation

Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall


Reality Mining




Identifying aggregate patterns of human
activity trends (see sensenetworks.com
by MIT and Columbia University)
Many devices send location information






14-13

Cars, buses, taxis, mobile phones, cameras,
and personal navigation devices
Using technologies such as GPS, WiFi, and
cell tower triangulation

Enables tracking of assets, finding
nearby services, locating friends/family
members, …

Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall


Reality Mining


Citisense: finding people with similar
interests

A map of an area of San
Francisco with density
designation at place of
interests
See
www.sensenetworks.com/c
itysense.php
for real-time animation
of the
content
Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
14-14


Virtual Worlds






Virtual worlds have existed for a long time
in various forms - stereoscopes, Cinerama,
simulators, computer games, …
They are artificial worlds created by
computer systems in which the user has
the impression of being immersed
Examples:




14-15

Second Life (secondlife.com)
Google Lively (lively.com)
EverQuest (everquest.com)

Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall

Avatars ?


Second Life as a DSS


Advantages:










14-16

Easy access and low cost
Experienced and dedicated designer/builders
Tools and venues for communications-driven
decision support (DecisionSupportWorld.com)
A large, dedicated user base
Impression management / creativity enhancement
Time compression
Easy data integration from real life using RSS feeds
Encourages active participation and experiential
learning

Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall


Second Life as a DSS


Disadvantages:









14-17

Learning time and training costs
Distractions are numerous
Pranksters and spam are common
Technology problems persist
Chat is a very slow communication tool
Resistance to use
Addiction
Participation in most of these virtual
environments requires downloading of a
"plug-in"

Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall


Virtual Tradeshows

See iTradeFair.com
14-18

Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall


The Web 2.0 Revolution






14-19

Web 2.0: a popular term for describing
advanced Web technologies and
applications, including blogs, wikis, RSS,
mashups, user-generated content, and
social networks
Objective: enhance creativity, information
sharing, and collaboration
Difference between Web 2.0 and Web 1.x
Use of Web for collaboration among
Internet users and other users, content
providers, and enterprises

Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall


The Web 2.0 Revolution






14-20

Web 2.0: a umbrella term for new
technologies for both content as well as how
the Web works
Web 2.0 have led to the evolution of Webbased virtual communities and their hosting
services, such as social networking sites,
video-sharing sites, …
Companies that understand these new
applications and technologies—and apply the
capabilities early on—stand to greatly improve
internal business processes and marketing

Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall


The Web 2.0 Revolution
Characteristics of the Web 2.0










14-21

The ability to tap into the collective intelligence of
users. The more users contribute, the better…
Data is made available in new or never-intended
ways. Web 2.0 data can be remixed or "mashed up”
Web 2.0 relies on user-generated and usercontrolled content and data (enhanced
collaboration)
Lightweight programming techniques and tools let
nearly anyone act as a Web site developer
The virtual elimination of software-upgrade cycles
makes everything a perpetual beta or work-inprogress and allows rapid prototyping, using the
Web as an application development platform

Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall


The Web 2.0 Revolution
Characteristics of the Web 2.0
Users can access and manage applications entirely
through a browser
 An architecture of participation and digital
democracy encourages users to add value to the
application as they use it
 A major emphasis on social networks and computing
 Strong support of information sharing and
collaboration
 Rapid and continuous creation of new business
models
“dynamic content, rich user experience, metadata,
scalability, open source, and freedom (net
neutrality)”


14-22

Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall


The Web 2.0 Revolution


Ajax (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML)








14-23

An enabling technology for Web 2.0, resulting
in rich, interactive, fast-response, user-friendly
GUIs
Makes Web pages feel more responsive by
exchanging small amounts of data with the
server behind the scenes (eliminated the need
for reloading the complete Web page)
Leads to improved Web page interactivity,
loading speed, and usability.

Many companies and new business models
have emerged based on Web 2.0

Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall


Virtual (Internet) Communities








14-24

A group of people with common interests
who interact with one another over a
computer network, mainly the Internet
Similar to typical physical communities,
such as neighborhoods, clubs, or
associations, but people do not meet faceto-face
It is a social network organized around a
common interest, idea, task, or goal
Members interact across time, geographic
location, and organizational boundaries

Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall


Virtual (Internet) Communities
Elements of Interaction

14-25

Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall


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