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PROFESSIONAL
MICROSOFT® SQL SERVER® 2012 REPORTING
SERVICES
FOREWORD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
xxxv
INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxxvii
 PART I GETTING STARTED
CHAPTER 1
Introducing Reporting Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
CHAPTER 2
Reporting Services Installation
and Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
CHAPTER 3
Confi guring SharePoint Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
 PART II REPORT DESIGN
CHAPTER 4
Basic Report Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
CHAPTER 5
Report Layout and Formatting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123

CHAPTER 6
Designing Data Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
CHAPTER 7
Advanced Report Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
CHAPTER 8
Chart Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
 PART III BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE REPORTING
CHAPTER 9
BI Semantic Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
CHAPTER 10
Reporting with Analysis Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263
CHAPTER 11
OLAP Reporting Advanced Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .295
 PART IV ENABLING USER REPORTING
CHAPTER 12
Tabular Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349
CHAPTER 13
Visual Analytics with Power View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373
CHAPTER 14 Report Builder Solution Strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 445
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 PART V SOLUTION PATTERNS
CHAPTER 15 Managing Report Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 463
CHAPTER 16 Report Solutions, Patterns, and Recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 483
 PART VI ADMINISTERING REPORTING SERVICES
CHAPTER 17 Content Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 525
CHAPTER 18 Integrating Reports with SharePoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 559
CHAPTER 19 Native Mode Server Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 581
 PART VII REPORTING SERVICES CUSTOM PROGRAMMING
CHAPTER 20 Integrating Reports into Custom Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 619
CHAPTER 21 Using Embedded and Referenced Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 681
CHAPTER 22 Extending Reporting Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 697
 PART VIII APPENDIXES
APPENDIX A T-SQL Commands, Clauses, and Predicates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 758
APPENDIX B T-SQL System Variables and Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 779
APPENDIX C MDX Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 803
INDEX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 829
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PROFESSIONAL
Microsoft® SQL Server® 2012
Reporting Services
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PROFESSIONAL
Microsoft® SQL Server® 2012
Reporting Services
Paul Turley,
Robert M. Bruckner,
Thiago Silva,
Ken Withee, and Grant Paisley
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Professional Microsoft® SQL Server® 2012 Reporting Services
Published by
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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Copyright © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana
Published simultaneously in Canada
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ISBN: 978-1-118-23713-7 (ebk)
ISBN: 978-1-118-26210-8 (ebk)
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This book is dedicated to my wonderful wife, Sherri,
for her love and endless support. To my dad, Mark,
and to the most incredible young people on the planet;
Krista, Sara, Rachael, and Josh.
— Paul Turley
Dedicated to my parents.
— Robert M. Bruckner
I dedicate this book to my beautiful wife, Michelle,
who still loves me and encourages me, after all
these years; to my children, Gabriella, Joshua, and
Olivia, who brighten my life with their smiles and
unconditional hugs; and to my mother Lucia who
keeps believing that I am a rockstar.
— Thiago Silva
I dedicate this book to my wife and best friend,
Rosemarie Withee.
— Ken Withee
I dedicate this book to my wife Sue, who still loves
me after all these years; to my teenage kids, Megan,
Lisa, and Zoe, who have turned out even better than I
could have hoped; and to mum and dad who gave me
the opportunity and encouragement to always do and
learn new things.
— Grant Paisley
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ABOUT THE AUTHORS
PAUL TURLEY is a Mentor with SolidQ, a Microsoft MVP, solution architect, teacher and presenter.
He speaks at industry conferences and authors several publications on BI, data visualization, and
reporting. He blogs at SQLServerBIBlog.com. He has been developing business database solu-
tions since 1991 for companies like Microsoft, Disney, Nike, and Hewlett-Packard. He has been a
Microsoft Certifi ed Trainer since 1996 and holds several industry certifi cations, including MCTS
and MCITP for BI, MCSD, MCDBA, MSF Practitioner, and IT Project+.
Paul has authored and coauthored several books and courses on databases, business intelligence,
and application development technologies. His books include SQL Server Reporting Services
Recipes for Designing Expert Reports, Professional SQL Server 2008 Reporting Services,
Professional SQL Server 2005 Reporting Services, Professional SQL Server Reporting Services
(SQL Server 2000), Beginning T-SQL with SQL Server 2005 and 2008, Beginning Transact-SQL
with SQL Server 2000 and 2005, Beginning SQL Server 2005 Administration, Beginning Access
2002 VBA, Data Warehousing with SQL Server 2000 Analysis Services, and Professional Access
2000 Programming — all from Wrox. He is also the lead author for SQL Server 2005 Integration
Services Step by Step from Microsoft Press.
ROBERT M. BRUCKNER, is a principal software architect and developer with the Microsoft SQL
Server division. Robert is responsible for the technical architecture of SQL Server Reporting Services
including Power View. One of Robert’s core areas has been the design and development of the scal-
able report processing engine, utilized by Reporting Services and Power View. Power View is an
enhancement of Reporting Services 2012, enabling end-users to easily and interactively visualize
data, quickly gain analytical insights, and simply have fun exploring data!
Prior to joining Microsoft in 2003, Robert researched, designed, and implemented database and
business intelligence systems as a system architect at T-Mobile Austria, and as a researcher at
Vienna University of Technology, Austria. Robert holds Master and PhD degrees with highest
distinctions in Computer Science from Vienna University of Technology, and holds several patents.
Anyone good with a search engine can fi nd thousands of Robert’s past postings on public news-
groups and MSDN forums sharing his insights, tips, tricks, and expert advice related to Reporting
Services and other SQL Server technologies. Robert has co-authored books on SQL Server
Reporting Services as well as Analysis Services. Robert regularly presents at industry conferences
and also maintains a popular blog at:
http://blogs.msdn.com/robertbruckner. In his spare
time, Robert enjoys mountain biking, skiing, and reading.
THIAGO SILVA is an MCPD and an architect and consultant for Credera. Thiago has been develop-
ing custom .NET and Reporting Services since the early days of .NET and SQL Server 2000. He is a
part of the Microsoft practice within Credera, a Dallas-based consulting fi rm, delivering Microsoft
solutions to clients that include several Fortune 500 companies. He has worked as a consultant for
the last eight years and as a software engineer and web developer prior to that. Thiago is co-author
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of the previous edition of this book, Professional SQL Server 2008 Reporting Services, and he
was a contributor in the book Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Recipes for Designing Expert
Reports. Thiago has been featured on the tech podcast “.NET Rocks!”, and he is a member of
the DFW .NET user groups and community. He occasionally writes articles on his tech blog
“Silvaware,” found at
http://silvaware.net. Thiago holds a BBA in Information and Operations
Management with a focus on Information Systems from Texas A&M University. He holds MCAD,
MCPD, and MCTS titles for web development using ASP.NET 2, 3.5, and 4.
KEN WITHEE is President of Portal Integrators LLC (www.portalint.com), a software develop-
ment company focused on developing world class business applications for the SharePoint platform.
He lives with his wife Rosemarie in Seattle, Washington, and is the author or coauthor of several
books including Microsoft Offi ce 365 For Dummies (Wiley, 2011), SharePoint 2010 Development
For Dummies (Wiley, 2011), Professional Microsoft Project Server 2010 (Wrox, 2012), Microsoft
Business Intelligence For Dummies (Wiley, 2010), Professional Microsoft SQL Server 2012
Reporting Services (Wrox, 2012), and Professional Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Reporting Services
(Wrox, 2008). Ken has also written a number of other published works in a variety of journals and
magazines.
Ken earned a Master of Science degree in Computer Science studying under Dr. Edward Lank at
San Francisco State University. Their work has been published in the LNCS journals and was the
focus of a presentation at the IASTED conference in Phoenix. Their work has also been presented at
various other Human Computer Interaction conferences throughout the world.
Ken has more than 12 years of professional computer and management experience working with
a vast range of technologies. He is a Microsoft Certifi ed Technology Specialist and is certifi ed in
SharePoint, SQL Server, and .NET.
GRANT PAISLEY is an SQL Server MVP and founder of Angry Koala, a Microsoft Business
Intelligence consultancy based in Sydney, Australia. Grant is president of the SQL Server Usergroup
Sydney and is an internationally recognized speaker who has spoken at TechEd USA, Australia, and
even China. His passion about BI, in particular with visualization of data, resulted in Grant creat-
ing
http://reportsurfer.com, a community reporting site. Grant was also a contributing author
for SQL Server 2008 Analysis Services with MD and Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services
Recipes. If you don’t see him on stage presenting, you might see him on the water kite surfi ng in
Hawai’i or mountain biking in Whistler.
ABOUT THE AUTHORS
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CREDITS
EXECUTIVE EDITOR
Robert Elliot
PROJECT EDITOR
Kelly Talbot
TECHNICAL EDITORS
Joe Salvatore
Chris Albrektson
Nigel Sammy
PRODUCTION EDITOR
Christine Mugnolo
COPY EDITOR
Gayle Johnson
EDITORIAL MANAGER
Mary Beth Wakefi eld
FREELANCER EDITORIAL MANAGER
Rosemarie Graham
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF MARKETING
David Mayhew
MARKETING MANAGER
Ashley Zurcher
BUSINESS MANAGER
Amy Knies
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Tim Tate
VICE PRESIDENT AND EXECUTIVE GROUP
PUBLISHER
Richard Swadley
VICE PRESIDENT AND EXECUTIVE PUBLISHER
Neil Edde
ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER
Jim Minatel
PROJECT COORDINATOR, COVER
Katie Crocker
PROOFREADER
James Saturnio, Word One
INDEXER
Johnna VanHoose Dinse
COVER DESIGNER
Ryan Sneed
COVER IMAGE
© Mark Evans / iStockPhoto
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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Thanks to:
My wonderful family for their enduring support and occasional tolerance for my over-commitment
to books, papers, projects, and events. To my wife Sherri who says “Honey, I love you, but if you
bring home one more piece of conference swag, you’ll sleep in the garage.”
…the Reporting Services and SQL Server BI product teams at Microsoft; Thierry, Sean, Carolyn,
Lukasz, Ariel, Robert, and many others who have been open and available for the past nine years of
books, projects, and support. Thank you for letting me play a small role in your quest to avail these
fantastic technologies to people who use them to deliver information and make important things
happen all over the world. Thanks to Mark, Chuck, Denny, Carl, John, and the SQL CAT team.
…the Microsoft MVP organization for building an unbelievable network of dedicated professionals.
To the SQL Server PASS organization who have nurtured a respected and trusted community. To
Arnie and the Oregon SQL team for being my “homies.” Thanks to all the PASS chapter directors
and SQL Saturday organizers everywhere.
…everyone at SolidQ for building a stellar organization, unlike any other. I’m proud to be counted
among so many trusted friends and professionals.
A heartfelt thanks to the editorial and management team at Wiley; especially Bob and Kelly. How
you maintain your sanity trying to manage those who write books in our “spare” time is beyond
my comprehension. Thank you for your enduring patience and perseverance. Thank you to my
co-authors and reviewers; Robert, Ken, Grant, Thiago, Joe, Chris, Nigel, and Glyn who have
endured endless nights and weekends, reviews, and rewrites. Just one more revision and we should
be done, guys! Thank you all for making this book happen.
I have a profound respect for those who write “those other” books, and who I consider to be peers
and co-contributors to a vibrant industry. Thank you Stacia, Teo, and Brian for keeping the bar high
and for your contributions to the industry.
— Paul Turley
Robert would like to thank in particular Paul Turley and Bob Elliott for great collaboration through-
out this project, drawing from the experience of several seasoned Reporting Services experts, and
collecting proven best practices from large-scale customer deployments of Reporting Services.
Furthermore, Robert would like to express a big “thank you” to all co-authors contributing to this
book, to Kelly Talbot for great editorial work, and to technical reviewers for ensuring accuracy.
— Robert M. Bruckner
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Thanks to Thierry D’Hers, Robert Bruckner, and the Reporting Services product team for their
guidance and technical assistance during the authoring of this book.
Thanks to Paul Turley for continuing to give me the opportunity to be a part of this book project,
and for Kelly Talbot and Bob Elliot’s support and patience during the writing and editorial process.
Finally, thanks to my wife and kids, who have put up with my long hours and weekend nights spent
during the writing of this book. I appreciate their love and encouragement and could not have done
this without them.
— Thiago Silva
I would like to acknowledge my grandma Tiny Withee who turns 99 this year and is still going
strong. I would also like to acknowledge my wife Rosemarie Withee, mother Maggie Blair, father
Ken Withee, sister Kate Henneinke, and parents-in-law Alfonso and Lourdes Supetran and family.
An extraordinary amount of thanks goes to my co-authors; Paul Turley, Robert Bruckner, Thiago
Silva, and Grant Paisley. Special thanks to Bob Elliott, Kelly Talbot, Gayle Johnson, Joe Salvatore,
Chris Albrektson, Nigel Sammy, and the rest of the Wrox team for making this book a reality.
— Ken Withee
Thank you to the Angry Koala Team, Glyn Llewellyn who picks up the reins in my absence and
helped in the writing of my chapters; Colin McGowan, David Lean, Geoff Orr, Mark Fitzpatrick,
Lesley Llewellyn, Peter Orgill, and Praveen Chand, who through their professionalism and enthusi-
asm for BI, are the backbone to my success. Thanks to my good friend Paul Turley for opportunity
and support during authoring; Kelly and the team at Wrox for their invaluable role in getting the
book into production. And fi nally my family Sue, Megan, Lisa, and Zoe that I love but rarely say so.
Oh and I nearly forgot: “Megan is awesome” — actually you all are!
— Grant Paisley
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
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CONTENTS
FOREWORD xxxv
INTRODUCTION xxxvii
PART I: GETTING STARTED
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCING REPORTING SERVICES 3
Who Uses Reporting Services? 4
Business Information Workers 5
Business Managers 5
Software Developers 5
System Administrators 5
Dashboards, Reports, and Applications 6
Blurring the Line Between Applications and Reports 6
Launching Reports from an Application 7
User Interaction 7
Integrating Reports and Applications 8
Enterprise Reporting 9
Solution Types 10
Simple Report Design 10
IT-Designed Reports 11
User-Designed Reports 12
Server-Based Reports 15
Business Intelligence Reporting Solutions 16
Report Data Sources 18
Analytic Data Sources and Self-Service BI 18
Complexity and Report Performance 19
Customizing the Reporting Experience 20
Summary 20
CHAPTER 2: REPORTING SERVICES INSTALLATION
AND ARCHITECTURE 23
The Basic Installation 24
Installing Reporting Services 25
Installing the Reporting Services Samples and
SQL Server Sample Databases 41
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CONTENTS
The Enterprise Deployment 41
SQL Server Editions 41
Named Instances 44
Topology 44
Modes 45
Installation Options 45
Command-Line Installation 46
The Reporting Life Cycle 46
Authoring 47
Management 47
Delivery 47
Reporting Services Tools 47
Report Designer 48
Power View 48
Report Builder 48
Third-Party Authoring Tools 49
Report Manager 49
SharePoint Libraries and Web Parts 49
Reporting Services Confi guration Manager 49
SQL Server Management Applications 49
Command-Line Utilities 50
HTML Viewer 50
Report Viewer Control 51
Reporting Services Web Service 51
Subscriptions 52
Reporting Services Windows Service 52
HTTP.SYS and the HTTP Listener 53
The Security Sublayer 54
Report Manager and the Web Service 55
Core Processing 55
Service Management 55
Confi guration Files 56
WMI and the RPC Interface 57
Reporting Services Processors and Extensions 57
The Report Processor 58
Report Session Caching 59
Report Execution Caching 59
Snapshots 60
Data Processing Extensions 60
Report Items 61
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CONTENTS
Rendering Extensions 61
The HTML Rendering Extension 62
The CSV-Rendering Extension 62
The XML-Rendering Extension 62
The Image-Rendering Extension 63
The PDF-Rendering Extension 63
The Excel-Rendering Extension 63
The Word-Rendering Extension 64
The Scheduling and Delivery Processor 64
Delivery Extensions 64
Reporting Services Application Databases 64
ReportServer 65
ReportServerTempDB 66
Summary 66
CHAPTER 3: CONFIGURING SHAREPOINT INTEGRATION 69
The SharePoint Technologies 70
SharePoint Foundation 70
SharePoint Server 71
SharePoint Web Parts 73
Installation and Confi guration 74
Installing SharePoint Server 2010 74
Installing Service Pack (SP) 1 76
Installing and Confi guring PowerPivot for SharePoint 77
Installing and Confi guring Reporting Services for SharePoint 81
SharePoint Site Settings 89
Architecture 90
Summary 91
PART II: REPORT DESIGN
CHAPTER 4: BASIC REPORT DESIGN 95
What Good Are Wizards, Anyway? 95
Building Blocks 96
Following Along? 97
Let’s Get Started 97
Touring Report Builder 107
O ce Tabs and Ribbons 108
Home Tab 108
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CONTENTS
Insert Tab 109
View Tab 110
Report Builder Menu 111
Viewing and Setting Properties 112
Data Sources 112
Server Reports 112
Manual Report Design 113
Building a Matrix 113
Wrapping It Up 118
Running and Saving the Report 120
Summary 120
CHAPTER 5: REPORT LAYOUT AND FORMATTING 123
Report Layout Types 124
Table Reports 124
Matrix Reports 125
List Reports 126
Chart Reports 126
Gauge Reports and Dashboards 127
Maps and Spatial Reports 127
Defi ning Table Groups 128
Group Expressions and Options 128
Formatting Table Values 130
Interactive Sort 134
Adding Page Breaks 135
Creating Drill-Down Reports and Dynamic Visibility 136
Formatting Report Data 138
Introduction to Dynamic Formatting 138
Designing Multicolumn Reports 139
Designing Gauge Reports 139
Browser Compatibility 140
O ine Viewing 141
Rendering Format Limits and Considerations 141
Summary 142
CHAPTER 6: DESIGNING DATA ACCESS 143
Business Intelligence Reporting 146
Reporting for Relational Data 148
Data and Query Basics 148
Data Sources 148
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CONTENTS
Creating a Data Source from the Project Add Item Template 149
Creating a Data Source in the Report Wizard 149
Creating a Data Source When Defi ning a Dataset 152
Data Sources and Query Languages 153
T-SQL Query Design 154
Data Warehouse Star Schema 155
Filtering Techniques 161
Filtering a Query 162
Parameter Concepts 163
Filtering Data with Query Parameters 165
Creating a Parameter List 167
Multivalue Parameters 168
Cascading Parameters 170
Report Parameters 175
Using Stored Procedures 176
Filtering Data with Report Parameters 177
Using Other Data Sources 180
Microsoft Access 180
Building a Query in a String Expression 183
Microsoft Excel 184
Oracle P/L SQL 185
Sybase Adaptive Server 186
Federating Data Sources 186
Best Practices 187
Summary 187
CHAPTER 7: ADVANCED REPORT DESIGN 189
Headers and Footers 190
Aggregate Functions and Totals 194
Adding Totals to a Table or Matrix Report 196
Creating Report Templates 198
Creating Composite Reports 199
Anatomy of a Textbox 199
Padding and Indenting 200
Embedded Formatting 201
Embedded HTML Formatting 202
Designing Master/Detail Reports 204
Groups and Dataset Scope 205
Using a List to Combine Report Items and
Data Regions 205
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CONTENTS
Designing Subreports 212
Federating Data with a Subreport 213
Execution and Resource Implications 216
Navigating Reports 219
Creating a Document Map 219
Links and Drill-Through Reports 221
Navigating to a Bookmark 223
Navigating to a URL 223
Reporting on Recursive Relationships 224
Summary 228
CHAPTER 8: CHART REPORTS 229
Chart Types 230
Column Charts 230
Stacked Charts 233
Area and Line Charts 233
Pie and Doughnut Charts 234
Bubble and Stock Charts 235
Chart Type Summary 237
The Anatomy of a Chart 239
Creating a Multiseries Chart 240
Using Multiple Chart Areas 242
Useful Properties and Settings 246
Control the Number of Items Displayed on an Axis 246
Manage Axis Text Placement and Rotation 246
Manage the Format of Axis Values 246
Change the Color and Width of a Series Line 246
Set a Tooltip for a Chart Value 246
Control the Width and Gap Between Columns or Bars 246
For a Chart with Multiple Chart Areas, Control the Exact Position
of Each Chart Area 247
Dynamically Increase a Chart’s Size 247
Summary 247
PART III: BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE REPORTING
CHAPTER 9: BI SEMANTIC MODELS 251
Introduction to Data Modeling 252
The BI Semantic Model 253
Conceptual Architecture 256
Data Model 257
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CONTENTS
Business Logic and Queries 260
Data Access 260
The Hybrid Nature of the BI Semantic Model 261
Summary 262
CHAPTER 10: REPORTING WITH ANALYSIS SERVICES 263
Why Use Analysis Services for Reporting? 264
Using Reporting Services with Analysis Services Data 266
Working with Multidimensional Expression Language 266
MDX: Simple or Complex? 267
Building Queries with the MDX Query Designer 267
Creating a Data Source 268
Building the Dataset Query 270
Using Parameterized Queries 273
Modifying the MDX Query 278
Adding Nonadditive Measures 285
When to Use the Aggregate Function 287
MDX Properties and Cube Formatting 289
Drill-Through Reports 290
Creating Cube Report Actions 291
Parameter Safety Precautions 292
Best Practices and Provisions 293
Summary 293
CHAPTER 11: OLAP REPORTING ADVANCED TECHNIQUES 295
Cube Dynamic Rows 296
Cube Dynamic Rows Anatomy 296
Parameters 296
Dataset 297
Matrix Content 301
Formatting the Row Label 301
Highlighting the Current Row 303
Dynamic Number Formatting 304
Self-Calling Drill-Through Action 304
Cube Dynamic Rows Summary 306
Cube Dynamic Rows Expanded 306
MDX Query Modifi cations 306
Design Surface Modifi cations 308
Tablix 308
Visualization Tweaks 308
Summary 309
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CONTENTS
Cube Restricting Rows 309
Designing the Report 309
pRowCount Parameter 309
Restricting the Number of Rows in the MDX Query 312
Adding pRowCount to Self-Calling Drill-Through Report Action 314
A Better Way to Interact with a Report Parameter 314
Summary 314
Cube Metadata 315
Designing the Report 315
MeasureGroups 318
Adding Other Cube Metadata 320
Final Thoughts 324
Cube Browser 324
Anatomy of the Reports 326
Cube Browser 326
Cube Browser Metadata 327
Cube Browser Member 329
Behind the Scenes 329
Cube Browser 329
Report Body 334
Restricting Rows and Columns 336
Swap Actions 336
Titles 338
Footer Information 342
Final Thoughts 345
Summary 346
PART IV: ENABLING USER REPORTING
CHAPTER 12: TABULAR MODELS 349
Introduction to PowerPivot 350
PowerPivot for Excel 352
Setup and Installation 354
Importing Data into PowerPivot 355
PowerPivot Window 360
The Home Tab 360
The Design Tab 361
The Advanced Tab 362
Analyzing and Enriching Data 363
Filtering and Sorting 363
Relationships 364
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CONTENTS
Calculated Columns 367
Measures 368
Browsing the Model 371
Summary 372
CHAPTER 13: VISUAL ANALYTICS WITH POWER VIEW 373
Introduction to Power View 374
Power View Architecture 379
Architecture Overview 380
Reporting Services Add-in 381
Reporting Services Service Application 381
PowerPivot for SharePoint 382
Preparing a Model and Connection for a Tutorial 382
Deploying the FAA Flight Data Model 383
Creating a SharePoint Image Library for FAA Airline Images 384
Publishing the FAA Workbook Directly to the PowerPivot Gallery 386
Creating Data Source Connections for Power View 387
BI Semantic Model (BISM) Connection File 387
Report Data Source (RSDS) Connection 388
Visual Analytics with Power View 389
Getting Started with Power View 390
Creating a New Power View Report 390
Opening an Existing Power View Report 391
Introduction to the Design Experience 391
Creating a Table Visualization 392
Converting Visualizations 394
Sorting Inside a Chart 395
Expanding Visualizations 396
Filtering in Views 396
Multiple Views 400
Saving Reports 403
Permissions for Power View 405
Visualizations and Interactivity 405
Tile Visualizations 405
Highlighting in Visualizations 408
Matrix 409
Slicers 410
Filters 410
Card and Callout Views 411
Zooming in Charts 413
Scatter and Bubble 414
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