Tải bản đầy đủ

Tài liệu EViews 4 User’s Guide pptx

EViews 4 User’s Guide
EViews 4 User’s Guide
Copyright © 1994–2002 Quantitative Micro Software, LLC
All Rights Reserved
Printed in the United States of America
ISBN 1-880411-28-8
Revised for EViews 4.1 - February 2002
This software product, including program code and manual, is copyrighted, and all rights
are reserved by Quantitative Micro Software, LLC. The distribution and sale of this product
are intended for the use of the original purchaser only. Except as permitted under the
United States Copyright Act of 1976, no part of this product may be reproduced or distrib-
uted in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system, without the
prior written permission of Quantitative Micro Software.
Disclaimer
The authors and Quantitative Micro Software assume no responsibility for any errors that
may appear in this manual or the EViews program. The user assumes all responsibility for
the selection of the program to achieve intended results, and for the installation, use, and
results obtained from the program.
Trademarks
Windows, Windows 95/98/2000/NT/Me, and Microsoft Excel are trademarks of Microsoft
Corporation. PostScript is a trademark of Adobe Corporation. X11.2 and X12-ARIMA Ver-

sion 0.2.7 are seasonal adjustment programs developed by the U. S. Census Bureau.
Tramo/Seats is copyright by Agustin Maravall and Victor Gomez. All other product names
mentioned in this manual may be trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective
companies.
Quantitative Micro Software, LLC
4521 Campus Drive, #336, Irvine CA, 92612-2699
Telephone: (949) 856-3368
Fax: (949) 856-2044
e-mail: sales@eviews.com
web: www.eviews.com
March 11, 2002
Table of Contents
P
REFACE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
P
ART
I. EV
IEWS
F
UNDAMENTALS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
C
HAPTER
1. I
NTRODUCTION
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
What Is EViews? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Installing and Running EViews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Windows Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
The EViews Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Closing EViews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Where To Go For Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
CHAPTER 2. A DEMONSTRATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Creating a Workfile and Importing Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Verifying the Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Examining the Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Estimating a Regression Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Specification and Hypothesis Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Modifying the Equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26


Forecasting from an Estimated Equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Additional Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
C
HAPTER
3. EV
IEWS
B
ASICS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Workfile Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Object Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
For More Info . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
CHAPTER 4. BASIC DATA HANDLING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Samples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Importing Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Exporting Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Frequency Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Commands for Basic Data Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Addendum: Reading ASCII Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Addendum: Matrix Object Reading and Writing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
ii— Table of Contents
C
HAPTER
5. W
ORKING

WITH
D
ATA
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Using Expressions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87
Working with Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94
Working with Auto-series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Working with Groups of Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
Working with Scalars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
CHAPTER 6. EVIEWS DATABASES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
An Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
Database Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108
Working with Objects in Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Database Auto-Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
The Database Registry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Querying the Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123
Object Aliases and Illegal Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131
Maintaining the Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133
Foreign Format Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .135
Working with DRIPro Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141
Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .147
P
ART
II. B
ASIC
D
ATA
A
NALYSIS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149
C
HAPTER
7. S
ERIES
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Series Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Spreadsheet and Graph Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151
Descriptive Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .152
Tests for Descriptive Stats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156
Distribution Graphs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
One-Way Tabulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166
Correlogram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .167
Unit Root Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .170
BDS Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Conversion Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .173
Label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Series Procs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Generate by Equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .174
Resampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .175
Table of Contents—iii
Seasonal Adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Exponential Smoothing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Hodrick-Prescott Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
CHAPTER 8. GROUPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Views from a Group Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Group Members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Spreadsheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Dated Data Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Graphs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Descriptive Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
N-Way Tabulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Principal Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Correlations, Covariances, and Correlograms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
Cross Correlations and Correlograms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
Cointegration Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
Granger Causality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
Label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Group Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
CHAPTER 9. STATISTICAL GRAPHS USING SERIES AND GROUPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225
Distribution Graphs of Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225
Scatter Diagrams with Fit Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233
Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242
CHAPTER 10. GRAPHS, TABLES, AND TEXT OBJECTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
Creating Graphs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
Modifying Graphs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244
Multiple Graphs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Printing Graphs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252
Copying Graphs to Other Windows Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252
Graph Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
Copying Tables to Other Windows Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254
Text Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255
Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255
iv— Table of Contents
P
ART
III. B
ASIC
S
INGLE
E
QUATION
A
NALYSIS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .257
C
HAPTER
11. B
ASIC
R
EGRESSION
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .259
Equation Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .259
Specifying an Equation in EViews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .260
Estimating an Equation in EViews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .263
Equation Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .265
Working with Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272
Estimation Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .276
Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .277
CHAPTER 12. ADDITIONAL REGRESSION METHODS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .279
Weighted Least Squares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .279
Heteroskedasticity and Autocorrelation Consistent Covariances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .281
Two-stage Least Squares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .283
Nonlinear Least Squares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .289
Generalized Method of Moments (GMM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .297
Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .301
CHAPTER 13. TIME SERIES REGRESSION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303
Serial Correlation Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .303
Testing for Serial Correlation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .304
Estimating AR Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .307
ARIMA Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .311
Estimating ARIMA Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .313
Diagnostic Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322
Polynomial Distributed Lags (PDLs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .323
Nonstationary Time Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .328
Unit Root Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .329
Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .341
CHAPTER 14. FORECASTING FROM AN EQUATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .343
Forecasting from Equations in EViews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .343
Illustration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .345
Forecast Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .349
Forecasts with Lagged Dependent Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .355
Forecasting with ARMA Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .356
Forecasting Equations with Formulas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .359
Table of Contents—v
Forecasting with Nonlinear and PDL Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 364
Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 364
C
HAPTER
15. S
PECIFICATION

AND
D
IAGNOSTIC
T
ESTS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367
Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367
Types of Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367
Residual Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375
Specification and Stability Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379
Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389
Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 393
P
ART
IV. A
DVANCED
S
INGLE
E
QUATION
A
NALYSIS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .395
C
HAPTER
16. ARCH
AND
GARCH E
STIMATION
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 397
The ARCH Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 397
Estimating ARCH models in EViews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400
Working with ARCH Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 404
Asymmetric ARCH Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407
The Component ARCH Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412
Estimating and Interpreting Models in EViews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 413
Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415
Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 418
C
HAPTER
17. D
ISCRETE

AND
L
IMITED
D
EPENDENT
V
ARIABLE
M
ODELS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421
Binary Dependent Variable Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421
Estimating Binary Models in EViews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 423
Procedures for Binary Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 433
Ordered Dependent Variable Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 438
Estimating Ordered Models in EViews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 439
Views of Ordered Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 442
Procedures for Ordered Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 443
Censored Regression Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 444
Estimating Censored Models in EViews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 445
Procedures for Censored Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 449
Truncated Regression Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 454
Procedures for Truncated Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 455
Count Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 458
Views of Count Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 462
vi— Table of Contents
Procedures for Count Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .462
Demonstrations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .463
Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .467
Technical Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .467
CHAPTER 18. THE LOG LIKELIHOOD (LOGL) OBJECT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .471
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 471
Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 473
Estimation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 479
LogL Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .480
LogL Procs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .481
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .483
Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .484
Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 486
P
ART
V. M
ULTIPLE
E
QUATION
A
NALYSIS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .493
C
HAPTER
19. S
YSTEM
E
STIMATION
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .495
Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .495
System Estimation Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .496
How to Create and Specify a System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .498
Working With Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .506
Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .510
Technical Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .511
C
HAPTER
20. V
ECTOR
A
UTOREGRESSION

AND
E
RROR
C
ORRECTION
M
ODELS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .519
Vector Autoregressions (VARs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .519
How to Estimate a VAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .520
VAR Estimation Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .521
Views and Procs of a VAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .522
Structural (Identified) VARs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .531
Cointegration Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .537
Vector Error Correction (VEC) Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .547
A Note on EViews Backward Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .550
C
HAPTER
21. P
OOLED
T
IME
S
ERIES
, C
ROSS
-S
ECTION
D
ATA
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .551
Creating a Workfile for Pooled Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .551
The Pool Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .551
Importing Pooled Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .553
Table of Contents—vii
Exporting Pooled Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 558
Working with Pooled Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 558
Pooled Estimation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 562
Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 571
Technical Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 571
CHAPTER 22. STATE SPACE MODELS AND THE KALMAN FILTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 577
Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 577
Specifying a State Space Model in EViews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 582
Working with the State Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 593
Converting from Version 3 Sspace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 599
Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 599
Technical Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 600
CHAPTER 23. MODELS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 601
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 601
An Example Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 604
Building a Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 618
Working with the Model Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 620
Specifying Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 625
Using Add Factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 626
Solving the Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 629
Working with the Model Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 640
Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 645
A
PPENDIX
A. G
LOBAL
O
PTIONS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 647
Setting Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 647
A
PPENDIX
B. D
ATE
F
ORMATS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 653
Date Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 653
Implicit Dating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 654
Special Date Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 655
Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 655
APPENDIX C. WILDCARDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 657
Wildcard Expressions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 657
Using Wildcard Expressions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 657
Source and Destination Patterns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 658
Resolving Ambiguities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 659
viii— Table of Contents
Wildcard versus Pool Identifier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .660
APPENDIX D. ESTIMATION ALGORITHMS AND OPTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .663
Optimization Algorithms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .663
Setting Estimation Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .666
Nonlinear Equation Solution Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .671
APPENDIX E. GRADIENTS AND DERIVATIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 675
Gradients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .675
Derivatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .678
A
PPENDIX
F. I
NFORMATION
C
RITERIA
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .683
Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .683
Using Information Criteria as a Guide to Model Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .684
R
EFERENCES
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .685
I
NDEX
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .693
Preface
This manual describes the interactive use of EViews, a program for statistical and econo-
metric analysis, and forecasting. For details on the EViews command language, as well as a
description of the programming and matrix languages, we refer you to the companion vol-
ume—the EViews Command and Programming Reference.
The manual is divided into five parts:
• Part I. “EViews Fundamentals” beginning on page 3—introduces you to the basics of
using EViews. In addition to a discussion of basic Windows operations, we explain
how to use EViews to manage your data.
• Part II. “Basic Data Analysis” beginning on page 149—describes the use of EViews
to perform basic analysis of data and to draw graphs and create tables describing
your data.
• Part III. “Basic Single Equation Analysis” on page 257—discusses standard regres-
sion analysis: ordinary least squares, weighted least squares, two-stage least
squares, nonlinear least squares, time series analysis, specification testing and fore-
casting.
• Part IV. “Advanced Single Equation Analysis” beginning on page 395—documents
autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (ARCH) models, discrete and limited
dependent variable models, and user specified likelihood estimation.
• Part V. “Multiple Equation Analysis” on page 493—describes estimation and fore-
casting with systems of equations, vector autoregression and error correction mod-
els, state space models, pooled cross-section/time series data, and model solution.
You should not feel a need to read the manual from cover-to-cover in order to use EViews.
We recommend, however, that you glance at most of Part I to gain familiarity with the
basic concepts and operation of the program. At a minimum, you should look over Chap-
ters 1–3, especially the extended demonstration in Chapter 2, “A Demonstration”, on
page 15.
2— Preface
Part I. EViews Fundamentals
The following chapters document the fundamentals of working with EViews:
• The first three chapters contain introductory material. Chapter 1, “Introduc-
tion” describes the basics of installing EViews. Chapter 3, “EViews Basics” pro-
vides an overview of EViews basics. Chapter 2, “A Demonstration” guides you
through a typical EViews session, introducing you to the basics of working
with EViews.
• Chapter 4, “Basic Data Handling” and Chapter 5, “Working with Data” docu-
ment the basics of working with data. We describe methods of getting your
data into EViews, using the built-in tools to manipulate and manage your data,
and exporting your data into spreadsheets, text files and other Windows appli-
cations.
• Chapter 6, “EViews Databases” contains more advanced material, describing
the EViews database features and advanced data handling features.
We recommend that you read through most of the material in this section before
beginning serious work with EViews. In particular, we suggest that you read the first
three chapters prior to using the program.
4—Part I. EViews Fundamentals
Chapter 1. Introduction
What Is EViews?
EViews provides sophisticated data analysis, regression, and forecasting tools on Win-
dows-based computers. With EViews you can quickly develop a statistical relation from
your data and then use the relation to forecast future values of the data. Areas where
EViews can be useful include: scientific data analysis and evaluation, financial analysis,
macroeconomic forecasting, simulation, sales forecasting, and cost analysis.
EViews is a new version of a set of tools for manipulating time series data originally devel-
oped in the Time Series Processor software for large computers. The immediate predeces-
sor of EViews was MicroTSP, first released in 1981. Though EViews was developed by
economists and most of its uses are in economics, there is nothing in its design that limits
its usefulness to economic time series. Even quite large cross-section projects can be han-
dled in EViews.
EViews provides convenient visual ways to enter data series from the keyboard or from
disk files, to create new series from existing ones, to display and print series, and to carry
out statistical analysis of the relationships among series.
EViews takes advantage of the visual features of modern Windows software. You can use
your mouse to guide the operation with standard Windows menus and dialogs. Results
appear in windows and can be manipulated with standard Windows techniques.
Alternatively, you may use EViews’ powerful command and batch processing language.
You can enter and edit commands in the command window. You can create and store the
commands in programs that document your research project for later execution.
Installing and Running EViews
Your copy of EViews 4.0 is distributed on a single CD-ROM. Installation is straightfor-
ward—simply insert your CD-ROM disc into a drive, wait briefly while the disc spins-up
and the setup program launches, and then simply follow the prompts. If the disc does not
spin-up, navigate to the drive using Windows Explorer, then click on the Setup icon.
We have also provided more detailed installation instructions in a separate sheet that you
should have received with your EViews package. If you did not receive this sheet, please
contact our office, or see our website: http://www.eviews.com.
6—Chapter 1. Introduction
Windows Basics
In this section, we provide a brief discussion of some useful techniques, concepts, and
conventions that we will use in this manual. We urge those who desire more detail to
obtain one of the (many) very good books on Windows.
The Mouse
EViews uses both buttons of the standard Windows mouse. Unless otherwise specified,
when we say that you should click on an item, we mean a single click of the left mouse-
button. Double click means to click the left mouse-button twice in rapid succession. We
will often refer to dragging with the mouse; this means that you should click and hold the
left mouse-button down while moving the mouse.
Window Control
As you work, you may find that you wish to change the size of a window or temporarily
move a window out of the way. Alternatively, a window may not be large enough to dis-
play all of your output, so that you want to move within the window in order to see rele-
vant items. Windows provides you with methods for performing each of these tasks.
Changing the Active Window
When working in Windows, you may find that you have a number of open windows on
your screen. The active (top-most) window is easily identified since its title bar will gener-
ally differ (in color and/or intensity) from the inactive windows. You can make a window
active by clicking anywhere in the window, or by clicking on the word Window in the
main menu, and selecting the window by clicking on its name.
Scrolling
Windows provides both horizontal and vertical scroll bars so that you can view informa-
tion which does not fit inside the window (when all of the information in a window fits
inside the viewable area, the scroll bars will be hidden).
The scroll box indicates the overall relative position of the window and the data. Here, the
vertical scroll box is near the bottom, indicating that the window is showing the lower por-
tion of our data. The size of the box also changes to show you the relative sizes of the
Windows Basics—7
amount of data in the window and the amount of data that is off screen. Here, the current
display covers roughly half of the horizontal contents of the window.
Clicking on the up, down, left, or right scroll arrows on the scroll bar will scroll the display
one line in that direction. Clicking on the scroll bar on either side of a scroll box moves the
information one screen in that direction.
If you hold down the mouse button while you click on or next to a scroll arrow, you will
scroll continuously in the desired direction. To move quickly to any position in the win-
dow, drag the scroll box to the desired position.
Minimize/Maximize/Restore/Close
There may be times when you wish to move EViews out of the way while you work in
another Windows program. Or you may wish to make the EViews window as large as pos-
sible by using the entire display area.
In the upper right-hand corner of each window, you will see a set of buttons which control
the window display:
By clicking on the middle (Restore/Maximize) button, you can toggle between using your
entire display area for the window, and using the original window size. Maximize (
1
)
uses your entire monitor display for the application window. Restore (
2
)returns the win-
dow to its original size, allowing you to view multiple windows. If you are already using
the entire display area for your window, the middle button will display the icon for restor-
ing the window, otherwise it will display the icon for using the full screen area.
You can minimize your window by clicking on the minimize button in the upper right-
hand corner of the window. To restore a program that has been minimized, click on the
icon in your taskbar.
Lastly, the close button provides you with a convenient method for closing the window. To
close all of your open EViews windows, you may also select Window in the main menu,
and either Close All, or Close All Objects.
8—Chapter 1. Introduction
Moving and Resizing
You can move or change the size of the window (if it is not maximized or minimized). To
move your window, simply click on the title bar (the top of your application window) and
drag the window to a new location. To resize, simply put the cursor on one of the four
sides or corners of the window. The cursor will change to a double arrow. Drag the win-
dow to the desired size, then release the mouse button.
Selecting and Opening Items
To select a single item, you should place the pointer over the item and single click. The
item will now be highlighted. If you change your mind, you can change your selection by
clicking on a different item, or you can cancel your selection by clicking on an area of the
window where there are no items.
You can also select multiple items:
• To select sequential items, click on the first item you want to select, then drag the
cursor to the last item you want to select and release the mouse button. All of the
items will be selected. Alternatively, you can click on the first item, then hold down
the SHIFT key and click on the last item.
• To select non-sequential items, click on the first item you want to select, then while
holding the CTRL key, click on each additional item.
• You can also use CTRL-click to “unselect” items which have already been selected.
In some cases it may be easier first to select a set of sequential items and then to
unselect individual items.
Double clicking on an item will usually open the item. If you have multiple items selected,
you can double click anywhere in the highlighted area.
Menus and Dialogs
Windows commands are accessed via menus. Most applications contain their own set of
menus, which are located on the menu bar along the top of the application window. There
are generally drop-down menus associated with the items in the main menu bar.
For example, the main EViews menu contains:

Selecting File from this menu will open a drop-down menu containing additional com-
mands. We will describe the EViews menus in greater detail in the coming sections.
There are a few conventions which Windows uses in its menus that are worth remember-
ing:
The EViews Window—9
• A grayed-out command means the command is not currently available.
• An ellipse (

) following the command means that a dialog box (prompting you for
additional input) will appear before the command is executed.
• A right-triangle (
8
) means that additional (cascading) menus will appear if you
select this item.
• A check mark (
a
) indicates that the option listed in the menu is currently in effect.
If you select the item again, the option will no longer be in effect and the check
mark will be removed. This behavior will be referred to as toggling.
• Most menu items contain underlined characters representing keyboard shortcuts.
You can use the keyboard shortcuts to the commands by pressing the ALT key, and
then the underlined character. For example, ALT-F in EViews brings up the File drop-
down menu.
• If you wish to close a menu without selecting an item, simply click on the menu
name, or anywhere outside of the menu. Alternatively, you can press the ESC key.
We will often refer to entering information in dialogs. Dialogs are boxes that prompt for
additional input when you select certain menu items. For example, when you select the
menu item to run a regression, EViews opens a dialog prompting you for additional infor-
mation about the specification, and often suggests default values for arguments. You can
always tell when a menu item opens a dialog by the ellipses in the drop-down menu entry.
The EViews Window
If the program is installed correctly, you should see the EViews window when you launch
the program. This is what the EViews window looks like:
10—Chapter 1. Introduction
You should familiarize yourself with the following main areas in the EViews window.
The Title Bar
The title bar, labeled EViews, is at the very top of the main window. When EViews is the
active program in Windows, the title bar has a color and intensity that differs from the
other windows (generally it is darker). When another program is active, the EViews title
bar will be lighter. If another program is active, EViews may be made active by clicking
anywhere in the EViews window or by using ALT-TAB to cycle between applications until
the EViews window is active.
The Main Menu
Just below the title bar is the main menu. If you move the cursor to an entry in the main
menu and click on the left mouse button, a drop-down menu will appear. Clicking on an
entry in the drop-down menu selects the highlighted item.
For example, here we click on the Objects entry in the main menu to reveal a drop-down
menu. Notice that some of the items in the drop-down menu are listed in black and others
are in gray. In menus, black items may be executed while the gray items are not available.
In this example, you cannot create a New Object or Store an object, but you can Print and
View Options. We will explain this behavior in our discussion of “The Object Window” on
page 46.
The Command Window
Below the menu bar is an area called the command window. EViews commands may be
typed in this window. The command is executed as soon as you hit ENTER.
The EViews Window—11
The vertical bar in the
command window is
called the insertion point.
It shows where the letters
that you type on the key-
board will be placed. As
with standard word pro-
cessors, if you have typed
something in the command area, you can move the insertion point by pointing to the new
location and clicking the mouse. If the insertion point is not visible, it probably means that
the command window is not active; simply click anywhere in the command window to tell
EViews that you wish to enter commands.
You can move the insertion point to previously executed commands, edit the existing com-
mand, and then press ENTER to execute the edited version of the command.
The command window supports Windows cut-and-paste so that you can easily move text
between the command window, other EViews text windows, and other Windows pro-
grams. The contents of the command area may also be saved directly into a text file for
later use: make certain that the command window is active by clicking anywhere in the
window, and then select File/Save As… from the main menu.
If you have entered more commands than will fit in your command window, EViews turns
the window into a standard scrollable window. Simply use the scroll bar or up and down
arrows on the right-hand side of the window to see various parts of the list of previously
executed commands.
You may find that the default size of the command window is too large or small for your
needs. You can resize the command window by placing the cursor at the bottom of the
command window, holding down the mouse button and dragging the window up or down.
Release the mouse button when the command window is the desired size.
The Status Line
At the very bottom of the window is a status line which is divided into several sections.
12—Chapter 1. Introduction
The left section will sometimes contain status messages sent to you by EViews. These sta-
tus messages can be cleared manually by clicking on the box at the far left of the status
line. The next section shows the default directory that EViews will use to look for data and
programs. The last two sections display the names of the default database and workfile. In
later chapters, we will show you how to change both defaults.
The Work Area
The area in the middle of the window is the work area where EViews will display the vari-
ous object windows that it creates. Think of these windows as similar to the sheets of
paper you might place on your desk as you work. The windows will overlap each other
with the foremost window being in focus or active. Only the active window has a darkened
titlebar.
When a window is partly covered, you can bring it to the top by clicking on its titlebar or
on a visible portion of the window. You can also cycle through the displayed windows by
pressing the F6 or CTRL-TAB keys.
Alternatively, you may select a window by clicking on the Window menu item, and select-
ing the desired name.
You can move a window by clicking on its title bar and dragging the window to a new loca-
tion. You can change the size of a window by clicking on any corner and dragging the cor-
ner to a new location.
Closing EViews
There are a number of ways to close EViews. You can always select File/Exit from the
main menu, or you can press ALT-F4. Alternatively, you can click on the close box in the
upper right-hand corner of the EViews window, or double click on the EViews icon in the
upper left-hand corner of the window. If necessary, EViews will warn you and provide you
with the opportunity to save any unsaved work.
Where To Go For Help
The EViews Manuals
This User’s Guide describes how to use EViews to carry out your research. The earlier
chapters deal with basic operations, the middle chapters cover basic econometric methods,
and the later chapters describe more advanced methods.
Though we have tried to be complete, it is not possible to document every aspect of
EViews. There are almost always several ways to do the same thing in EViews, and we can-
not describe them all. In fact, one of the strengths of the program is that you will undoubt-
edly discover alternative, and perhaps more efficient, ways to get your work done.
Where To Go For Help—13
Most of the User’s Guide explains the visual approach to using EViews. It describes how
you can use your mouse to perform operations in EViews. To keep the explanations simple,
we do not tell you about alternative ways to get your work done. For example, we will not
remind you about the ALT- keyboard alternatives to using the mouse.
When we get to the discussion of the substantive statistical methods available in EViews,
we will provide some technical information about the methods, and references to econo-
metrics textbooks and other sources for additional information.
The Help System
Almost all of the EViews documentation may be viewed from within EViews by using the
help system. To access the EViews help system, simply go to the main menu and select
Help.
Since EViews uses standard Windows Help, the on-line manual is fully searchable and
hypertext linked. You can set bookmarks to frequently accessed pages, and annotate the
on-line documentation with your own notes.
In addition, the Help system will contain updates to the documentation that were made
after the manuals went to press.
The World Wide Web
To supplement the information provided in the manuals and the help system, we have set
up information areas on the Web that you may access using your favorite browser. You can
14—Chapter 1. Introduction
find answers to common questions about installing, using, and getting the most out of
EViews.
Another popular area is our Download Section, which contains on-line updates to EViews
Version 4, sample data and programs, and much more. Your purchase of EViews provides
you with much more than the enclosed program and printed documentation. As we make
minor changes and revisions to the current version of EViews, we will post them on our
web site for you to download. As a valued QMS customer, you are free to download
updates to the current version as often as you wish.
So set a bookmark to our site and visit often; the address is:
http://www.eviews.com.
Chapter 2. A Demonstration
In this chapter, we provide a demonstration of the basic features of EViews. The dem-
onstration is not meant to be a comprehensive description of the program. A full
description of the program begins in Chapter 3.
This demo shows takes you through the following steps:
• importing data into EViews from an Excel spreadsheet
• examining the data and performing simple statistical analysis
• using regression analysis to model and forecast a statistical relationship
• performing specification and hypothesis testing
• plotting results
Creating a Workfile and Importing Data
The first step in the project is to read the data into an EViews workfile.
Before we describe the process of importing data, note that the demonstration data
have been included in your EViews directory in both Excel spreadsheet and EViews
workfile formats. If you wish to skip the discussion of importing data and go directly
to the analysis part of the demonstration, you may load these data by selecting File/
Open/Workfile… and opening DEMO.WF1.
To create a workfile to hold your data, select File/New/Workfile…, which opens a
dialog box where you will provide information about your data:
For our example, quarterly data are observed from the first quarter of 1952 to the end
of 1996. You should set the workfile frequency to quarterly, and specify the start date
1952:1, and the end date 1996:4.

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