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Chap 3 corprate appraisal

182 CHAPTER 3: Corporate Appraisal

Chapter 3
Corprate Appraisal

A. Intoduction
1. Meaning of Corporate Appraisal (TM 3-1)
2. Scope of Corporate Appraisal (TM 3-2)
B. Corporate Publics
1. Corporate Publics and Their Concerns (TM 3-3)
2. Coors’ Commitment to Its Stakeholders (TM 3-4)
C. Value System of Top Management
1. Corporate Culture of Select Companies (TM 3-5)
2. Four Catagories of Corporate Culture (TM 3-6)
3. Measuring Value Orientation (TM 3-7)
D. Corporate Resources
1. Meaning of Corporate Resources (TM 3-8)
2. Resources and Marketing Strategy (TM 3-9)
E. Key Success Factors in Difference Industries (TM 3-10)
F. Business Unit Performance (TM 3-11)



183 CHAPTER 3: Corporate Appraisal

3-1

MEANING OF
CORPORATE APPRAISAL
Corporate appraisal is a measurement of the readiness of the internal culture of the corporation to
interact with the external environment.
Marketing strategists are concerned with those
aspects of the corporation that have a direct bearing
on corporate-wide strategy, which is referred to in
defining business unit mission.


CHAPTER 3: Corporate Appraisal 184

3-2

SCOPE OF CORPORATE
APPRAISAL


185 CHAPTER 3: Corporate Appraisal

3-3

CORPORATE PUBLICS AND THEIR CONCERNS
PUBLICS
Owners

AREA OF CONCERN
Payout
Equity
Stock prices
Nonmonetary desires

Customers

Business reliability

Product reliability
Product improvement
Product price
Product service
Continuity
Marketing efficiency

Employees of all ranks

Monetary reward
Reward of recognition
Reward of pride
Environment
Challenge
Continuity
Advancement

Suppliers

Banking community and other lenders

Government (federal, state, and local)

Immediate community

Society at large

Price
Stability
Continuity
Growth
Sound risk
Interest payment
Repayment of principal
Taxes
Security and law enforcement
Management expertise
Democratic government
Capitalistic system
Implementation of programs
Economic growth and efficiency
Education
Employment and training
Civil rights and equal opportunities
Urban renewal and development
Pollution abatement
Conservation and recreation
Culture and arts
Medical care


CHAPTER 3: Corporate Appraisal 186

3-4

Coors’ Commitment to
its Stakeholders
Corporate Philosophy:
“Quality in all we are and all we do”
Customers:
Provide them products and services of
recognizably superior quality.
Suppliers:
Build quality relationships. Contracts and prices
should be mutually beneficial.
Community:
Improve quality of life by complying with all the
laws and the corporate code of conduct.
Stockholders:
Consistently pay dividends and seek appreciation
in the value of capital.


187 CHAPTER 3: Corporate Appraisal

3-5

CORPORATE CULTURE OF
SELECT COMPANIES
• International Business Machines Corporation:
Marketing drives a service philosophy that is almost
unparalleled.
• International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation:
Financial discipline demands total dedication.
• Delta Air Lines Inc.: Focus on customer service
produces a high degree of teamwork.
• Microsoft: Emphasis on innovation creates freedom
with responsibility.
• Toyota: Standards in efficiency, productivity, and
quality are the most important pursuits.
• GE: Conduct continuous campaigns to become the
lowest-cost producer in its area.


CHAPTER 3: Corporate Appraisal 188

3-6

FOUR CATEGORIES OF CORPORATE CULTURE
Academies (example: IBM)


Have parents who value self-reliance but put less emphasis on honesty
and consideration.



Tend to be less religious.



Graduated business school with high grades.



Have more problems with subordinates in their first ten years of work.

Clubs (example: United Parcel Service)


Have parents who emphasize honesty and consideration.



Have a lower regard for hard work and self-reliance.



Tend to be more religious.



Care more about health, family, and security and less about future income
and autonomy.



Are less likely to have substantial equity in their companies.

Baseball Teams (example: accounting firms)


Describe their fathers as unpredictable.



Generally have more problems planning their careers in the first ten years
after business school and work for more companies during that period than
classmates do.



Include personal growth and future income among their priorities.



Value security less than others.

Fortresses (example: retailers)


Have parents who value curiosity.



Were helped strongly by mentors in the first year out of school.



Are less concerned than others with feelings of belonging, professional
growth, and future income.



Experience problems in career planning, on-the-job decisions, and job
implementation.


189 CHAPTER 3: Corporate Appraisal

3-7

MEASURING VALUE ORIENTATION
.


CHAPTER 3: Corporate Appraisal 190

3-8

MEANING OF CORPORATE RESOURCES
Resources are distinctive capabilities and
strengths. Resources may be categorized as:


Financial strength



Human resources



Raw material reserve



Engineering



Production



Management



Marketing


191 CHAPTER 3: Corporate Appraisal

3-9

RESOURCES AND MARKETING
STRATEGY
1. Has ample cash on hand (financial strength).
2. Average age of key management personnel is 42
years (human resources).
3. Has a superior raw material ingredient in reserve
(raw material reserve).
4. Manufactures parts and components that go into
the final product (plant and equipment).
5. Products, if properly installed and serviced
regularly, never stop while being used (technical
competence).
6. Has a knowledge of, close relationship with, and
expertise in doing business with the grocery
chains (marketing strength).


CHAPTER 3: Corporate Appraisal 192

3-10

KEY SUCCESS FACTORS
IN DIFFERENT INDUSTRIES
SPECIMEN INDUSTRIES
KEY FACTOR OR
FUNCTION

TO INCREASE
PROFIT

TO GAIN
SHARE

Raw materials
sourcing

Uranium

Petroleum

Production facilities
(economies of scale)

Shipbuilding,
steelmaking

Shipbuilding,
steelmaking

Design

Aircrafts

Aircrafts, hi-fis

Production
technology

Soda,
semiconductors

Semiconductors

Product range/variety

Department stores

Components

Application
engineering/engineers

Minicomputers

Large scale
integration (LSI),
microprocessors

Sales force
(quality x quantity)

Electronic code
recorders (ECR)

Automobiles

Distribution network

Beer

Films,
home appliances

Servicing

Elevators

Commercial
vehicles—e.g.,
taxis


193 CHAPTER 3: Corporate Appraisal

3-11

BUSINESS UNIT PERFORMANCE
A. Financial
Sales—dollar and/or volume
Operating profit before taxes
Cash flow
Depreciation
Sales per employee
Profits per employee
Investment per employee
Return on investment/
sales/assets
Assets turnover
B. Human Resources
Use of employee skills
Productivity
Turnover
Ethnic and racial composition
C. Facilities
Rated capacity
Capacity utilization
Modernization

D. Inventories
Raw materials
Finished products
Obsolete inventory
E. Marketing
Research and Development
expenditures
New products
Number of salespersons
Sales per salesperson
Promotion expenditures
F. International Business
Growth rate
Geographic coverage
G. Managerial Performance
Leadership capabilities
Planning
Development of personnel
Delegation



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