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Theory and practice of counseling and psychotherapy 10th corey chapter 11

Theory and Practice of Counseling and
Psychotherapy
TENTH EDITION

Gerald Corey

Cengage Learning

Copyright © 2017 Cengage Learning


Chapter 11
Choice Theory/Reality Therapy

Copyright © 2017 Cengage Learning


Basic Assumptions (slide 1 of 2)


Symptoms are the result of choices we’ve made




We can choose to think, feel and behave differently



Reality therapy is based on Choice Theory



Emphasis is on personal responsibility



Therapist’s function is to keep therapy focused on the present and not on symptoms

Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy - Chapter 11 (1)


Basic Assumptions (slide 2 of 2)


We often mistakenly choose misery in our best attempt to meet our needs



We act responsibly when we meet our needs without keeping others from meeting their needs



The notion of transference is rejected by reality therapists

Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy - Chapter 11 (2)


Basic Human Needs


All internally motivated behavior is geared toward meeting one or more of our basic genetically

encoded needs:



Love and belonging



Power



Freedom



Fun



Survival (physiological needs)

Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy - Chapter 11 (3)


Our Quality World


Our quality world consists of our visions of specific people, activities, events, beliefs, and
situations that will fulfill our needs



Our quality world is like a picture album of specific wants as well as precise ways to satisfy these
wants



Getting into the clients’ quality world is the art of therapy

Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy - Chapter 11 (4)


Total Behavior


Doing – active behaviors



Thinking – thoughts, self-statements



Feelings – anger, joy, pain, anxiety



Physiology – bodily reactions

Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy - Chapter 11 (5)


Cycle of Counseling


Two major components:

1.

Creating the counseling environment



2.

Supportive, challenging, and noncoercive

Implementing specific procedures that lead to changes in behavior



WDEP

Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy - Chapter 11 (6)


The “WDEP” System
Procedures That Lead to Change:
W

D

Wants - What do you want to be and do?

Doing and Direction - What are you doing?
Where do you want to go?

E

Evaluation - Does your present behavior have a
what you want?

P

3
Planning – “SAMIC ”

Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy - Chapter 11 (7)

reasonable chance of getting you


Planning For Change
S

Simple

A

Attainable

M

Measurable

I

Immediate and involved

C

Controlled by the planner, committed to, and consistently done

Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy - Chapter 11 (8)


Application to Group Counseling
(slide 1 of 2)


Group leaders and members jointly determine goals and plans of action



Members explore new courses of behavior that will bring them closer to getting what they want
out of life



Leaders challenge members to evaluate for themselves if what they are currently doing is
working for them

Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy - Chapter 11 (9)


Application to Group Counseling
(slide 2 of 2)


Feedback from leaders and members can help individuals design realistic and attainable plans



Group setting encourages members to take an active stance in attaining change in their lives

Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy - Chapter 11 (10)


Strengths from a Diversity Perspective (slide 1 of
2)


Therapists demonstrate their respect for their clients’ cultural values by helping them explore
how satisfying their current behavior is to themselves and others



It is a sign of respect that the reality therapist refrains from deciding what behaviors should be
changed



With a focus on thinking and acting rather than on feelings, many clients are less likely to display
resistance

Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy - Chapter 11 (11)


Strengths from a Diversity Perspective (slide 2 of
2)


The principles underlying choice theory are universal, which makes choice theory applicable to
all people



Reality therapy is an open system that allows for flexibility in application based on the needs of
culturally diverse individuals

Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy - Chapter 11 (12)


Limitations from a Diversity Perspective


Reality therapy gives only limited attention to helping people address environmental and social
problems



Some reality therapists may not pay enough attention to systemic and environmental factors that
can limit the potential for choice



Some clients are very reluctant to directly verbally express what they need

Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy - Chapter 11 (13)


Contributions of Reality Therapy (slide 1 of 2)


RT has a relatively short-term focus and deals with conscious behavioral problems



The existential underpinnings of choice theory are a major strength of this approach, which
accentuates taking responsibility for what we are doing

Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy - Chapter 11 (14)


Contributions of Reality Therapy (slide 2 of 2)


With the emphasis on responsibility and choice, individuals can acquire a sense of self-direction
and empowerment



RT can be effectively used with individuals who manifest reluctance and who are highly resistant



RT has been effectively used in addiction treatment and recovery programs for over 30 years

Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy - Chapter 11 (15)


Limitations of Reality Therapy
(slide 1 of 2)


Some feel RT does not adequately address important psychological concepts such as insight, the
unconscious, dreams and transference



Clinicians may have trouble viewing all psychological disorders (including serious mental illness)
as behavioral choices



More empirical support of RT is needed

Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy - Chapter 11 (16)


Limitations of Reality Therapy
(slide 2 of 2)


Some therapists may impose personal views on clients by deciding for them what constitutes
responsible behavior



RT is often construed as simple and easy to master when in fact it requires much training to
implement properly

Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy - Chapter 11 (17)



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