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Group counseling strategies and skills chapter 5

Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

Getting Started:
The Beginning Stage and
Beginning Phase

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Chapter 5


Make sure the first session is more than warm-up
and introductions—introduce the content and
make the sessions interesting.

Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

The first and second sessions of any group are
often the most important and usually are the
most difficult to lead. Plan these sessions well.


©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

The Beginning


Start with a more detailed opening statement
about group and its purpose; then conduct an
introduction exercise
Start with an opening statement; then get right
into the content of the group.

Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

Make a brief statement about the group; then
conduct an introduction exercise

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Options for the First Session


Start with a brief statement about the group; then
have members fill out a short sentencecompletion form
Start with an introduction exercise
Start with an unusual opening—one that grabs
the members

Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

continued

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

How to Begin the Group


2. Helping Members Get Acquainted






Name round
Name tags
Dyads
3. Setting a Positive Tone
• Do not focus on negative members or issues
4. Clarifying the Purpose of the Group

Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

1. How to Begin the group

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

19 Things to Consider
in a First Session


5. Explaining the Leader’s Role
6. Explaining How the Group Will be Conducted
7. Helping Members Verbalize Expectations

Remember, sometimes members have no
expectations.
8. Drawing Out Members

Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

continued

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

19 Things to Consider


9. Using Exercises

• Rounds
• Dyads
• Sentence completion
10. Checking Out the Comfort Levels of the
Members
11. Explaining Group Roles
12. Explaining Any Special Terms that Will be Used
13. Assessing Members’ Interaction Styles

Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

continued

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

19 Things to Consider


14. Being Sensitive to Multicultural issues
15. Cutting Off members
16. Focusing on the Content
17. Addressing Questions
18. Getting Members to Look at Other Members

when talking
19. Closing the First Session
– Evaluation of the First Session

Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

continued

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

19 Things to Consider


Planning For the Potential Letdown
Ending the Second Session

Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

Opening the Second Session
– Introducing New Members
– Depends on Success of the First Session

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

The Second Session


The purpose of the beginning phase is to
allow members to get focused, check-in, and
for the leader to get a read on the members’
energy for the session.
The length of the warm-up phase varies
according to the kind of group

Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

Every session has a beginning or warm-up
phase and leaders should always consider
how they are going to open each session.

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

The Beginning Phase of Subsequent
Sessions


– Start with a movie or tv clip
– Start with some kind of mock dramatic beginning
– Start with a prop that focuses members’ attention

Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

Use rounds regarding how the week has
been
Ask members for progress reports
Ask members if they have something they
want to discuss in group that day
Creative Beginnings

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Opening the Beginning Phase


too long
(2)Leaders let the members stray from the

purpose of the group and get into
irrelevant topics
(3)Leaders skip the warm-up

Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

(1)Leaders let the beginning phase go on

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Mistakes During the Beginning Phase



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