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Group counseling strategies and skills chapter 1

Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

Ed E. Jacobs
Christine J. Schimmel
Robert L. Masson
Riley L. Harvill

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Group Counseling:
Strategies and Skills


Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

Introduction

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Chapter 1



Make a list of the advantages and
disadvantages of group counseling.

Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

In groups of four,


Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

Efficiency
Experience of Commonality
Greater Variety of Resources and Viewpoints
Sense of Belonging
Skills Practice
Feedback
Vicarious Learning
Real-Life Approximation
Commitment

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Reasons for Leading Groups


Make a list of all the groups you have been a
part of, or know about.

Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

In groups of 4,


Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

Education
Discussion
Task
Growth & Experiential

Counseling & Therapy
Support
Self-Help

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Kinds of Groups


Group counseling is not for everyone
Certain issues require individual counseling

Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

Group counseling has specific advantages

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Group Versus Individual
Counseling


Certain kinds of groups (discussion, education,
task groups) do not require the use of
counseling theory

Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

Individual counseling theories (REBT, CBT,TA,
Adlerian, Behavioral, Reality Therapy) are
helpful when leading counseling, therapy, and
growth groups

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Use of Theories


Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

People don’t mind being led when they are led
well.
Group counseling should never be boring.
Group counseling should be clear and concrete.
The counselor is primarily responsible for the
group but not ultimately responsible for the
outcome.

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Our Approach to Groups:
Impact Therapy


Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

Important considerations:
Cultural background
Gender
Age
Sexual orientation

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Group Counseling in a
Multicultural Context


Jacobs, Masson, Harvill, and Schimmel’s
position is that an active style of leadership
works best for most groups.

Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

The major leadership debate is centered on how
active, directive, and structured the leader
should be.

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Group Leadership Styles


Group-directed - the leader will turn the group
over to the members and have the members
determine the direction and content.

Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

Leader-directed - the leader has an
understanding of the member’s needs and
structures the group to meet those needs

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Leader-Directed Vs Group-Directed


Intrapersonally oriented leaders focus on the needs and
concerns of the individual members.
Interpersonal
Intrapersonal
Focus on group process
Focus on personal issues
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Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

Leadership styles can be viewed on a continuum.
Interpersonally oriented leaders emphasize the “here”,
and the dynamics of the group.

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Interpersonal Versus Intrapersonal
Leadership Styles


– Content - the task or purpose of the group
– Process - the interaction between members,
between members and the leader, and how
members participate in the group

Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

There are both content and process functions
that the leader must address.

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Leadership Functions


What do you think are the characteristics of
good group leaders?

Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

In groups of 4,


Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

Experience with individual counseling
Experience and comfort with groups
Planning and organizational skills
Knowledge of relevant topics
An understanding of basic human issues and
conflicts
A thorough understanding of counseling theory

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

What Makes An Effective Leader?


Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

Read and understand the Ethical Codes of your
professional organizations
Be well prepared and knowledgeable on the
topics of the groups you lead
Have adequate supervision and opportunities for
personal growth outside groups you lead
Avoid harmful dual relationships

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Ethical Considerations When
Leading Groups


Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

Maintain appropriate confidentiality
Inform members about the goals and purpose of
the group and expectations of members
Know and use exercises properly, advise
members of potential risks, and allow time to
process
Encourage, but don’t demand participation
Don’t trick members into opening up
Make appropriate post-group referrals

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Additional Ethical
Considerations


Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

Know the relevant laws of your state
As a leader, always use due care and act in
good faith
Maintain a “standard of group practice” common
to your profession
Be aware of your clients’ rights
Practice within your level of competence

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Legal Issues


Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

Members will do many of the following:
Skip from topic to topic
Dominate the discussion
Be “chit-chatty” rather than personal and focused
Attend sporadically
Be shy and withdrawn
Get angry at the leader

©2016. Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Potential Group Problems


Copyright © 2012 Brooks/Cole, a division of Cengage Learning, Inc.

Get angry at one another
Pressure (force) others to speak
Preach their personal morality
Be resistant because forced to attend
Dislike other members
Stop attending the group

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More Potential Problems



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