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Favorite things ( Teacher Manual ) giáo trình giảng dạy tiếng anh hay

“FAVORITE THINGS”

TEACHING
MANUAL
Lesson Plans
Teaching Activities
Resources






For The

American Summer English
Student Workbook
The Edge English Institute
Field Tested, Prepared, Written, Edited, Accumulated, and Acquired
by
&


Peggy Dockery
E.S.L. Teacher since 1986
China Teacher 1992-2001

Phyllis Merritt
E.S.L. Teacher since 1970
China Teacher 1997-2005

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“Favorite Things”
TEACHING MANUAL
for the
American Summer English Student Workbook
Lesson Plans
with
Activities and Resources
The Edge English Institute

AKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The Teaching Manual for the Summer Student Workbook and the
Summer Student Workbook are based on materials first developed by
Betsy Cunningham.
Themes for Lessons 1– 16 are taken from vocabulary found in The
New Oxford Picture Dictionary.
Additional original materials for the lessons were provided by
Peggy Dockery, Cheryl Gimple, Harriette Mergele, and Phyllis Merritt.
RECOMMENDED RESOURCES FOR TEACHERS





The New Oxford Picture Dictionary, or
Word by Word Picture Dictionary
Word by Word Teacher’s Resource Book and Activity Masters

Friendship English — Columbia International University
TEFL Program

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TEACHING MANUAL FOR SUMMER STUDENT WORKBOOK 2013
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Pages
ii
iii
vi

Acknowledgements
Table of Contents/Needs
Preface “Dear Teacher”
Lesson 1
People and Relationships
Need: Photos of family Song: Getting to Know You
Video Touched by an Angel

1

Lesson 2
The Family
Need: Pictures of various family relationships; Video of your own family or
another family, e.g., The Waltons, Little House on the Prairie, Swiss
Family Robinson, Seventh Heaven

15

Lesson 3
Body Parts
Need: Pictures to describe people’s appearance; Faces Chart, Expressions
of Emotions Song: Head and Shoulders, Knees, Feet, Toes

27

Lesson 4
Medical and Dental
Need: Pictures of doctor’s/dentist’s offices/hospitals/equipment;
Video: Dr. Quinn: Medicine Woman video
series or other appropriate medical movie, Chariots of Fire,

36

Lesson 5
Ailments and Injuries, Treatments and Remedies
Need: Pictures of various injuries; Video on someone suffering an injury
(or you could divide videos into two-days viewing); Grab bag
of objects – band aids, tongue depressors, thermometer.
ointment, etc Video: segments from ER, Gideon’s Crossing.

48

Lesson 6
Need:

Foods, Vegetables, Fruits, and Meats
Picture file on various food items; small cards with pictures of food
from grocery advertisements; pictures showing count and non-count
food items; Hershey’s Kisses for a taste treat (enough for 35).
Videos: Veggie Tales, Copies of Food Pyramid.

56

Lesson 7
Need:

Containers, Quantities and Money
The food section of the newspaper (10-15 copies); samples of USA
coins and bills (perhaps a shiny copper penny to give as a gift to each
student, about 35); pictures of food items in their packaging (frozen,
canned, dry, bulk, fresh); your prepared speech on how you
spend/save money (banking items such as checkbook, travelers’ checks,
credit cards.

65

Lesson 8
Need:

Supermarket and Restaurant
Grocery ads; home video of you shopping in your favorite supermarket;
video of family eating out in America—at fast food drive-through, better
restaurants; menus from hometown Snack samples like M&M’s Cheetoes,
Gummy bears, mints, gum, etc.

73

Lesson 9

Clothing

82

Need: Sample swatches of fabric: colors, stripes, checked, polka dots, solids,
prints, plaids, textures, rayon, cotton, wool, etc., or pictures of fabric);
pictures of everyday clothing advertisements from Sears, Penney’s
(bring 15); be prepared with pictures of kinds of clothing American
sub-cultures wear. Catalogs like Lands’ End
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Pages
Lesson 10
The Weather and Seasons
Need: Video tape weather reports for a week. Pictures of unusual weather.
Calendar scenes showing seasons. A picture of a small boat in a
storm-tossed sea (Homer Winslow would be good.)
Weather pages from newspaper.

90

Lesson 11
The American Classroom and American Education
Need: Home video of a local school. Videos of The Miracle Worker
(about Helen Keller); Stand and Deliver; Dead Poet’s Society;
Mr. Holland’s Opus, Music of the Heart (Meryl Streep) or one
about American education; a sample textbook or other
school-related material: an American flag; magazine pictures.

100

Lesson 12
Houses and Furniture
Need: Pictures of your home and furnishings listed in vocabulary.
Pictures to illustrate the items “left us” in the story “the Gift
of Going Without”—tin tub, oil lamp, wood stove, milking,
vegetable garden, City scenes—metropolitan, suburban,
and small town housing; pictures depicting the vocabulary
building words such as spacious, restoration, etc. Bob Villa TV
program, HGTV segments , 5 outside pictures of houses other pictures of
rooms; floor plans.

113

Lesson 13
The City and Directions
Need: Copies of a small town map; Downtown Map Game

123

Lesson 14
The Office and Occupations
Need:
Pictures of occupations, office equipment, scenes in offices,
common jobs, professional personnel, immigrant workers in
the US. Classified ads, Office, Depot, Comp USA ads

135

Lesson 15
Cars and Transportation
Need: Pictures of a wide variety of transportation—modern, vintage,
and futuristic; video of t.v. commercials and/or colored newspaper
and magazine ads for automobiles; Video: Tucker: A Man & His
Dream; Henry Ford: The Legend;” or other appropriate choices.

147

Lesson 16
Outdoor Activities and Sports
Need: Pictures of sports, sports figures, equipment; Videos: Angels in
the Outfield, Field of Dreams, and others, Team posters, frisbee

156

Lesson 17
Weddings
Need: Pictures representing Wedding Vocabulary; home video of a wedding;
Preparation list of things couples must do to prepare

169

Lesson 18
Thanksgiving
Need: candy corn (5 for each student), costumes, pictures of Thanksgiving scenes

182

Lesson 19
Christmas
Need: Tapes of Christmas carols, class, computer roster, sample Christmas cards
balloons, warm fuzzies, 2001 pennies, gift bags. Small American flag. Stamps

190

Appendix

Suggestions
Categories Game Resource
How to Give a Bible

205
215
219
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Teaching Supplies Checklist
Teaching Pictures .
__See Table of Contents
Needs
__”Refrigerator” magnets to hold posters on the blackboard
__ Gold Safety pins—one for each member of the class. When you or another student overhears
class members speaking anything except English, the pins can be removed and worn by the
one who catches them. Award a prize to the student collecting the largest number of pins.
__Jumbo Ziplok Bags
1 to carry teaching materials, posters, handouts for class.
1 to put them back in as you finish during the class.
__Brown paper bags to be packed flat in your suitcase, then opened, folded down about a third of
the way to use as “files” in your room.
__Chalk/chalk holder to keep your hands clean
__Magic markers
—Masking tape — painter’s tape, 2 inch size
—Post It Notes can also be used to attach papers to blackboard
—Index cards
—Games, craft supplies
—City map
—Restaurant menus
—Coins ($1 each of pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters, a Sacajaweea coin dollar)
—Paper Money ($1, $5, $10, $20)
—Cloth map of the world and of the United States (check Hancock’s, Jo Ann Fabrics or Hobby -—–
Lobby) or bring a paper map.
—Pictures of family/friends/job
—Floor Plan
—Long balloons for making figures the last day of class. See the internet for samples.
—Stamps for game prizes
—Snacks for class Sweet Tarts, M&M’s, Cheetos, pretzels, small candy canes, Valentine Candies
with messages.
___Wooden craft sticks to write each person’s name and then use to select for response in class—
and to call roll.
—Be a Kid Again props, bubbles to blow, straw to blow paper from, round balloons to pop.
—Cassettes with songs
—Videos
—Christmas cards
—Index cards, white for name tents, pink and blue for student information
From the Newspaper
—Auto ads
—Groceries ads (45 copies would be good --get extras from a couple of supermarkets.)
—Wedding pages, wedding catalog from JC Penny
—Mother’s Day/Father’s Day/ ads from Sunday paper, Target etc.
—The weather page (save from different seasons) with US map—USA color
—Houses/Apartments for sale.
—Sunday ads
Game Prizes or Gifts
—Donations from cosmetic counters, perfume samples, etc.
—Book marks
—Stickers
—Postcards
—Small American flags
—Pens (donated)
—Sports team posters, baseball cards, t-shirts

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For the Teacher,
There are three parts to each lesson in this Teacher Manual

AGENDA PAGE

TEACHING the Summer Student Workbook

LEARNING ACTIVITIES and RESOURCES
The AGENDA serves as a guide of things to do each day. These ideas may be used
throughout the class time, or for the beginning of class.
The TEACHING section include pages from the Summer Student Workbook and has
instructional material placed in boxes. Obtain, in China, the SSW printed for the
students.
LEARNING ACTIVITIES contain ideas which will help your students develop their
communicative skills. Use these as a way to improve speaking skills. They also
contain resources, puzzles, extra pronunciation advice, games, etc.
The lessons are numbered 1-19 to match the SSW. It is not necessary to do each lesson
in sequence. For example, Christmas or wedding activities should be started in class at
least a week before student assemblies.
The First Day
Arrive Early For peace of mind, get to class early and be ready for the day—calm, composed, and
organized with board work, poster hanging, sorting materials, and room arrangement complete. Take a
deep breath, smile, and look poised as you wait to greet your eager students.
Don’t Forget . . . your lesson plan, materials, handouts, and do not EVER be caught without bottled
water, Tylenol, and a ready supply of Kleenex.
Special Activities
Bring Index Cards Take two colors of index cards (3x5 or 4x6) for student demographic data. (You may not be able
to distinguish male from female names on your class roll so ask the girls fill out pink cards and the boys blue cards
(or mark with a colored pen). Ask for this information:

Chinese name (meaning), Name in Pinyin (so you can pronounce it in English),
American name (if none, do they want one?)
Hobby(ies)
Birthday
Educational level and major
Occupation/profession, marital status
Home address, telephone number, B.P. number
E-mail
Ask each student to write the meaning of their Chinese given name (poppy, Courage, etc. Bring a
Names book that has names, origins, meanings, etc. Select one that seems fitting.
This is a most important act, an honor for you and a treasure for them. It’s almost like naming your child. If a
student has an American name that would bring derision in an English-speaking culture, rename him/her suitably
tefore they go overseas to English-speaking cultures. Or say, “ I will select a name for you for this class.

Another day ask students to make an acrostic. Write their American name vertically down the back of
their card and using the letters of their name tell something about themselves.
J-ust
O-pen-minded
Y–outhful
Use White Index Cards and fold in half to make name tents. Provide a large magic marker to write names
on both sides.
Explain Your Class Procedure Class Goal, Roll Check, Posting of Announcements, Journal, Homework,
Class Work, Group Work, Pair Work, Afternoons, Lectures, Special Activities etc.
Make a “HELP WANTED” poster soliciting student positions: Class Monitor, Class Artist, Class
Calligrapher (Printer), Class Technician (gets and returns equipment, operates video, cassette player,
etc.)
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From: PD & PM


What to Do Every Day
STEP 1. Meet EFL students’ two needs:
a. To hear a teacher who is a native English speaker.
b. Time to practice speaking what they are hearing and learning.
The teacher’s job is to balance class time so that
students speak more
and the teacher speaks less.
Telling is not necessarily teaching
Listening is not necessarily learning
A. Learning a language is a skill like learning to play the piano or tennis
B. Teach for success
Give the answer before you ask the question.
Don’t say anything your students cannot understand.
Give time for your students to practice in lots of different ways.
(Remember a new word must be spoken at least 40 times before it is learned)
STEP 2. Make language learning productive and fun.
a. Tongue twisters, jazz chants, grammar points, idioms, or a
story are all very different language activities.
b. Each is a “part” to be connected to the “whole.”
part = activities
whole = theme, topic for the day
STEP 3. Create a good lesson — include the following:
GREETINGS AND CLASS OPENING ACTIVITIES (15—30 MINUTES)
Get students’ attention, mark the beginning of the lesson, introduce the topic (or theme), review
or preview new content of the lesson, lower anxiety by connecting to something known or
familiar to students.
Possible Activities proverb, roll call, idioms, pronunciations, word games, jazz chant,
song, story, quotation, brainstorming…and be sure every Student has spoken during this time.
TEACHING THE SUMMER STUDENT WORKBOOK
PRESENTATION (5-15 minutes)
Present the new language in a natural context and make meaning clear.
The new language might be pronunciation or vocabulary.
Possible Ways Realia, pictures, dialogues, reading texts, listening to texts, TPR actions.
PRACTICE (15-20 minutes)
Have students practice speaking and listening for accuracy.
Possible Activities listening/speaking drills, questions and answers,
written exercises (fill-in-the-blank, matching, etc.)
TIPS Give clear instruction and demonstrate (model) what the
students are to do. Repeat what you say if needed. Ask If there are
any questions.
COMMUNICATIVE ACTIVITIES (40- 50% OF TOTAL CLASS TIME)
Spend time with the lesson content: vocabulary building, discussion,
viewing pictures and discussing, focusing on new language meanings
through group work, and/or pair-share conversations about the lesson topic.
Possible Activities games, role play, information , interviews, surveys,
problem-solving, real- world tasks
WRAP-UP (5 minutes)
Assign homework, cover unfinished business, make announcements for interviews,
appointments, and afternoon plans, and teach “farewells”
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SAMPLE SCHEDULE
Morning
MORNING SCHEDULE
8:30–11:30
a.m.a.m.
8:30–11:30

A SAMPLE DAY

ANNOUNCEMENTS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
JOURNAL ASSIGNMENT
JOURNAL
ASSIGNMENT
Student/Teacher
Dialogue
Journaling

STUDENT/TEACHER DIALOGUE JOURNALING

EMOTIONS GRAPHICS
GRAPHICS
What to sayEMOTIONS
instead of “Fine,
thank you” when asked,

HAT TO SAY INSTEAD OF “FINE, THANK YOU” WHEN ASKED,
“How are you W
today?”
“HOW ARE YOU TODAY?”

GREETING
GREETING
ROLL CALL
ROLL CALL
PROVERB
PROVERB
TONGUE TWISTER
TONGUE TWISTER
WORD GAME
WORD GAME
IDIOM

IDIOM

PRONUNCIATION WARM-UPS /PRONUNCIATION ADVICE
PRONUNCIATION WARM-UPS

TEACHING
the Summer
Student Workbook
PRONUNCIATION
ADVICE
THEME For The Day

 Group-Related
Activities
TEACHING
the Summer
Student Workbook

 THEME
Listening Skills
 Games

Vocabulary
Building

Group-Related Activities
Games Language Enrichment, Discussion

Comprehension
Development
 Communication
Skills
 Listening Skills
Language
Enrichment, Discussion
Jazz Chan
ts
 Stories
 Vocabulary
Building
Communication
Skills
Singing
 Comprehension Development
Stories Dialogues
 Jazz Chants
Dialogues
Singing

SINGING
SINGING
FAREWELL
FAREWELL

AFTERNOON
AFTERNOON
3:00—5:00
p.m. SCHEDULE
3:00—5:00
p.m.
Monday/Wednesday and Tuesday/Thursday schedules are
alternated between A, B, and C level classes for Lecture days.

Monday/Wednesday and Tuesday/Thursday schedules are
alternated between A, B, and C level classes for Lecture days.

LECTURE with FOLLOW-UP CLASS DISCUSSION
(two days each
k)
LECTURE
withwee
FOLLOW-UP
CLASS DISCUSSION
(two days each week)

CLASS ACTIVITIES
(two days
each week)
CLASS
ACTIVITIES

Projects,
Free
Talk, Activities, Games/Crafts,
(two
days each
week)
Review,
Skits,
Dancing,
Movies, Field Trips
Projects,
Free
Talk,Line
Activities,
Games/Crafts,
Review, Skits, Line Dancing, Movies, Field Trips

FRIDAY
FRIDAY
Class-planned Activities, Outings (Museum, Park, etc.),

Class-planned
Activities, Outings
(Museum,
Bamboo Park, etc.),
Wedding Ceremony,
Christmas
Play
Wedding Ceremony, Christmas Play

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GROUPING
PAIR WORK
Partner activities give students non-threatening, one-on-one opportunities to interact on
a personal level. They do 50% of the talking and listening. Pair activities can include
Games, Interviews, Journals and Role Plays.
Pairing partners can be done in a variety of ways. The easiest way is to have students
seated next to each other be partners. However, since an objective of the partner
activities is for students to get to know one another, having a variety of partners is
essential. Pairing students in different ways maintains students' attention, moves them
around the room, and helps them to learn each other's names.
Suggestion
Count the students in the class; then divide them in half by left side/right side or front/back.
 Hand out slips of paper to one half of the students.
 Ask them to write their whole names on the paper and fold the paper.
 Collect all the folded papers, then walk through the other half of the class. Have each
student pick one folded paper.
 When all the papers are handed out, instruct the students with the papers to find their
partners and sit down together.
 Depending on the class (and your own teaching style), you may prefer an open freefor-all with everyone walking around at once, calling out names, or a more structured
pairing in which one student at a time reads the name on his or her paper, the
student named raises his or her hand, and the two then sit together.
This method of pairing can be used again and again, dividing the class in different ways
to assure that students have many different partners and get to know everyone in the
class by name.
GROUP WORK
For some activities, larger groups of students are preferable. Again, grouping students
can be done in a variety of ways.
Suggestion
Have students count off numbers, (1-4, 1-5, 1-6, etc.), then join the group that has their
number.
To practice vocabulary, you may replace numbers with items from the current
vocabulary list--colors, fruits, vegetables, flowers, seasons, etc.
List the group names on the board (for example, with colors, Red, Black, Yellow, Green,
etc.), then assign each student a color and have students form groups, according to
their assigned color.

From a Conversation Book 1, English in Everyday Life, Carver, Fotinos, Prentice Hall Regents

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General Suggestions
Brown paper bags make good file cabinets in your room.
Take lessons to class in a large plastic bag.
Use masking tape all around the edges of posters to keep on the wall
Make Posters on thin paper.
Make Posters on white plastic bags—they will stay on the wall with static electricity
Pairing up students.
Buy the colorful cloth maps of the world and the US at Wal-Mart—they do not tear.

Comprehension Activities
Teacher Presentation -- (maximum 10 minutes)
Choose an activity that presents the new language in a natural context and makes the meaning and usage clear. The new language might be vocabulary, functional phrases, or a grammar structure. Students should see ( on board or handout) and hear
a model of the new language. Keep it focused–like a laser beam rather than a strobe light. “Teach a little, practice a lot.” Always check for understanding.
Possible methods: Use realia, pictures, dialogues, reading of listening texts, actions, etc.
Student Practice – (30% - 35% of class time)
Select activities/techniques that give the students practice in using the new language material. These should be conducted in a
controlled manner with predictable responses (until students get it right!). The activities should leave little room for error and
help students become comfortable in manipulating (not creating) the new material. Focus on accuracy, correcting all errors at
this point. Remember, this is the “canned” conversation practice that prepares students for real communication.
It isn’t necessary (or advisable) to use every technique suggested on the lesson plan form in each lesson. Nor is it necessary
to always teach words/phrases, statements, and question/answer patterns in separate activities; these can sometimes be combined. Instead, select the techniques and activities that work best with the content and objectives of the lesson and the proficiency level of the students.
Possible techniques/activities: TPR, repetition, substitution, transformation, question/answer, chain drills, pair practice, practice games, directed dialogue, mini-survey/interview and vocabulary building.
TIP: The “set-up” for each activity is important. Give clear instructions and demonstrate what the students are to do.

Words/Phrases:
List words or phrases that are new in the lesson content. Select activities and techniques that will teach meaning and correct pronunciation
while giving students ample oral repetition of the words/phrases. With beginners and low intermediates, pictures, realia and “acting out”
will be necessary to convey meaning. High intermediate and advanced students can usually comprehend meaning through definitions, paraphrases, and sample sentences.

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Statements:
Look for statements in the lesson content that use new vocabulary or new grammar structures. Select activities to
give students oral practice of these sentence patterns. Beginners and low intermediates will usually repeat
statements modeled by the teacher. High intermediate and advances students can often generate their own
statements.
Questions:
Select questions from or related to the lesson content and choose activities that will give students oral practice in
asking and answering the questions. Sometimes the questions are new structures which require repeated oral
practice based on teacher modeling. At other times, they are a review of previous material to prepare students for
communication practice activities. At higher proficiency levels, students may generate their own questions,
depending on the lesson content and objective.
Communication Practice – (40-50% of class time)
This is the most important part of the lesson. Select activities that will encourage students to use the new language
material in a natural way, expressing their own meaning with unpredictable responses. The focus here is on
effective, meaningful communication. Do not expect complete accuracy. Avoid error correction in order to
promote the development of fluency without fear of mistakes. Quietly evaluate student’s errors and plan for
further practice at a later time.
Possible activities: role-play, storytelling, discussion, interview/survey, problem solving, games,
quotes/proverbs/speeches, pictures/tangible objects.
Closure: Plan an activity that will bring closure to the communication practice. Gather groups or pairs back together
for reporting, feedback, review, wrap-up, affirmation, etc.
Pronunciation
Pronunciation practice takes place naturally during comprehension activities. However, there may be a need to focus
on specific problem areas, such as individual sounds, blends, intonation, stress, rhythm. Address these specific
needs by preparing activities that will provide focused practice of the problem area.
Possible activities: minimal pair exercises, tongue twisters, chants.
ADDITIONAL COMPONENTS
Review
If needed, plan a brief activity to review material from a previous lesson or problem areas from the current lesson.
This time can also be used for brief reports or questions related to homework.
Writing
Give students an opportunity to write new material from the lesson (new vocabulary, sentence patterns,
question/answer patterns) in their notebooks. To save time in class, provide handouts of the new language material if
this is possible. If time permits and students desire writing practice, they can also write personalized statements or
short paragraphs related to the lesson topic. (Writing activities can be given as homework assignments to reinforce
what was learned in class.) Journal writing is another popular activity that can be used effectively in the classroom (or
as a homework assignment).
Note: Reading is not emphasized in class since these lessons focus on speaking practice. However, some reading
usually takes place during the lesson, either to help students with comprehension, or as a natural component of one
or more of the activities.
Extra Activity
It’s always wise to have an extra activity planned in case the lesson moves faster than anticipated, or simply wasn’t
as relevant to the students as expected. Select activities that are similar to the communication practice activities.
Remember, however, that the extra activity is optional, while the communication practice is essential. It’s good
if this extra activity relates to the lesson topic, but not absolutely necessary. Choose something fun, such as a game
or an activity that involves physical movement, since students are usually tired at this point.
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Homework
A homework assignment helps to reinforce what was covered in class, or can prepare students for the next
lesson. It’s also an opportunity for students to get writing practice, since they don’t do much writing in class.
Possible assignments: gather information or items for the next lesson; complete fill-in-the blank activities,
write personalized statements or short paragraphs, or write a brief report related to that day’s lesson topic;
review notes/handouts from that day’s lesson; conduct an interview or survey outside the class; prepare a
speech or report; listen to an English broadcast on TV or radio (if available).
Leave Taking
Practice a different farewell each day, “So long,”
crocodile.”

“See you later,” “See you later alligator,” “After ‘while

TEACH FROM THE LESSON PLAN, not from a textbook.
Some important considerations related to Lesson Planning
For the very first class, prepare the first two or three lesson plans, and be prepared to increase or decrease
the level of difficulty since you will not be certain of the proficiency level of your students. You will know more
about what to expect from your students after you begin working with them.
If you discover that the material in a particular lesson is too difficult and too much to cover in the time
allotted, decrease the vocabulary taught so that students have time to use the vocabulary immediately in real
conversation. You can teach additional vocabulary from that lesson in the next class session with more
opportunities for real conversation.
Proceed to new material only when students demonstrate proficient use of material in the current
lesson. Trying to teach too much too fast is a common mistake made by inexperienced CE teachers. “Teach
a little, learn a lot.” Provide plenty of time for students to use the language they are learning.
Thoughtful preparation is a major key to success as a CE teacher. Your commitment to preparing well will
contribute to a positive influence before your students and will allow you to be truly flexible and attentive to
their needs in the classroom.
GAMES AND GAME-LIKE ACTIVITIES
Games are informal, fun, conversation generating activities which reinforce lesson content. Game formats
will vary. A key element of games is that students are encouraged to produce language rather than listen.
Benefits
Informal speech is generated by students in a relaxed atmosphere.
Games provide motivation to participate and achieve success.
Language reviewed and practiced in a fun format promotes long-term retention.
Procedure
Provide students with all supplies needed to participate.
Model the game pattern once or twice completely before beginning the game with students.
Monitor the progress, participation and effectiveness of the game.
Modify the pattern as necessary to improve student success and participation.
Notes About Games
Be sure the game has a language teaching objective which allows students to practice English.
Select games that:
– are age appropriate
– are appropriate for students’ language level
– relate to the lesson content
– have simple instructions
– are adaptable (can be modified as needed)

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Sample Games:
1) What’s in the Bag? One student or team has a bag with an item in it that’s related to the day’s lesson. They give one hint about the item
(for example, “it’s used in the kitchen”). The rest of the class or other teams ask yes/no questions to guess what it is.
2) I Spy – One student selects something he can see in the classroom and makes a statement about it: “I spy something blue.” Other
students ask yes/no questions to guess the item.
3) Twenty Questions – Students are divided into teams. Teams take turns choosing someone to be “It.” “It” thinks of a specific item and tells
the class the category – person, place or thing. (Examples: my wedding ring; the Eiffel Tower; Charles Lindberg.) Teams take turns asking “It”
yes/no questions to guess the item. The game ends when a team guesses correctly, or a total of twenty questions have been asked,
whichever comes first. The team guessing correctly gets a point. If no correct guess is made before twenty questions are asked, “It” reveals
the item and earns a point for his team.
4) Eight in a Minute - The teacher prepares index cards with eight words listed on each one. The words on each card should belong to a
category of some type. (See suggested categories below.) Students take turns randomly selecting one of the cards, and announcing the
category. In this game, instead of the guessers asking questions, the knower gives oral clues ONLY, while the other students try to guess the
words. The knower has one minute to try to get his group to guess all eight words on the card. One point is earned for each correct guess.
This game can be played in small groups with each group getting identical sets of cards.
Example: Classroom Items, desk, book, chalk, pencil, student, map, teacher, eraser
Examples of oral clues: desk - “Students sit here.”
chalk - “It’s white.“ ”Use it to write on the blackboard.”
students - “Not the teacher.” “Person who studies.”
Some Categories:
1) things that are green
2) things to eat
3) things in a bathroom
4) animals
5) vegetable
6) fruits
7) body words
8) clothing
9) furniture
10) time words
11) workers
12) things that fly
13) things at the beach 14) places around town
15) things with wheels
16) things in a park
Frequency Game
The teacher prepares a circle divided into 10 sections with a spinner in the center. Each section on the circle has a time frequency word
written in it: always, usually, regularly, often, frequently, sometimes, occasionally, seldom, rarely, never. (This game is based on a lesson
related to the use of time frequency words. This same idea can be used with other lesson content by changing the words or phrases written
in the sections on the circle.) A student spins the spinner and must use the time frequency word it points to in a personalized statement.
Examples: “I rarely see the sunrise.” “My husband usually takes out the garbage.” “My daughter seldom irons her clothes.”
Guessing Games
These are games in which one or more students must discover – by asking questions or receiving clues – a piece of information known to
one or more others in the class. Some general guidelines for these games are:
– There are two sides – the “knower(s)” and the “guesser(s).”
 The speaking practice takes place in the asking of questions, so optimal practice occurs when the knowers are limited (1 student or
group), and the rest are the guessers.
– Questions should usually be of the Yes/No variety.
 – Guessing should be stimulated by some hint about the unknown item: color, category, function, first letter of its name, etc.
Who’s Telling the Truth?
Students are divided into teams of three. The teacher gives a topic, and each student is asked to recall an event in their lives related to the
topic.
Sample Topics: a) a time when you got in trouble in school b) a birthday party you remember c) the best gift you ever received
d) a special memory with a grandparent
In each team, the three students share their BRIEF stories and select ONE which they will use. When a team has a turn to be “It,” all three
students tell the SAME story – the one they selected. The other students then have a limited amount of time to ask questions to try
to determine which student is telling the truth. The three team members should try to answer the questions in ways that convince the
others they are telling the truth.
When questioning time is up, the class votes on who they think is telling the truth. Then the real truth-teller stands up. The “truth” team gets
one point for each vote that was NOT correct – in other words, for each person who chose the wrong “truth” teller.
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TEACHING COMPREHENSION
What are Comprehension Activities?
Comprehension activities are techniques which introduce and provide practice of new language. Oral practice is essential
to speak a new language. This is true at all proficiency levels. Students practice by repeating words, statements, and
questions. Through practice, they learn word meaning, correct pronunciation, and grammatical structures which are
embedded in the statements and questions being practiced. To be effective, comprehension activities must include teaching
the meaning of what is being repeated, and the new material must be relevant to the lives of the students.
Comprehension activities lay the foundation for using the new language naturally in real conversation. In fact, without the
oral repetitions, which are really "canned" conversation, students cannot internalize and use the new language to
communicate confidently in the real world. So regardless of what resource is used in preparing a CE lesson,
comprehension activities are the an essential component.
Oral repetitions can quickly become tedious and tiresome unless there is considerable variety in how the activities are
conducted. There are also significant differences in the ways comprehension activities are conducted at different levels.
For example, beginners need pictures, actions or real items to convey meaning, and initially will repeat only what is
modeled for them by the teacher. Advanced students, however, can often help build the vocabulary needed for
communicating on a particular topic. Once the meanings and correct pronunciation of words or phrases are clarified,
students can practice using the new language in activities that allow them to generate their own statements and questions.
For these reasons, a variety of techniques for conducting comprehension activities will be demonstrated in the workshop,
and participants will have opportunities to practice them. Participants will also learn which techniques work best at the
different proficiency levels.
The practice of techniques for conducting comprehension activities will not feel natural in the workshop, since participants
all speak English. Be assured that in the classroom students will need every opportunity to practice and you will not feel
awkward. In the workshop, participants will learn several basic techniques and the steps involved, along with appropriate
gestures to use in conducting them. In the real CE classroom, however, the teacher will select the techniques, steps and
gestures most appropriate for a particular lesson and/or class. Simple, beginner level language material will be used initially
in the workshop during the practice of techniques. This is so that participants can focus on learning the steps and gestures
for the various techniques.

Suggestions for Conducting Oral Repetitions










Model a new word or sentence before asking students to speak.
Allow students to repeat many times.
Introduce longer segments in short “chunks”.
Be consistent with your intonation and stress.
Always practice with class, then groups, then individuals or pairs.
Express pleasure and encouragement.
Conduct drills briskly; pauses deaden enthusiasm.
Say words and sentences naturally.
Always review previous material.

Learning Styles
 Kinesthetic
 Visual
 Auditory
 Print-Oriented
 Interactive
 Tactile
 Olfactory
Gustatory

I have to move around to do it!
I have to see it!
I have to hear it!
I have to write it—or read it!
I have to do it!
I have to touch it!
I have to smell it!
I have to taste it!
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July 2013
Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

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-1-Aug

2-Aug

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TEACHING

People and Relationships

LESSON 1

Opening Remarks
Begin: Good morning. We are now beginning the 2007 American Summer English Program!
(Place on board)

The goals for our class are:
1. Improve Listening Comprehension

and Speaking Skills.

2. Learn about American culture.
3. Make new friends.

Introduce yourself: My name is ______________________. Please call me ______________
Ask class to all stand. Say, Sit down
“ “
“ “
“ “
“ “

If you know every person in this class.
If you know 10 people in this class
If you know 5
If you know 1 other person in this class.
If you do not know any one in this class.

Place a question mark on the board and write What, Who, Where, When around it.

?

Ask students to introduce selves with the following pattern (My name is . . . . . )
Remind students of the 3 goals and say, We will all become friends by the end of our program.
Looking Ahead Say, Every day you will have Journal Writing for homework. Each Friday you can
hand in one of the writing assignments for review and comment.
Procedure: 1. Look on blackboard each day for the Journal Topic.
2. Write on that topic.
3. Write 1/2 to 1 page for each topic.
General Instructions: Say, Our class will be patterned after an American classroom setting and may be
different from any you have had before.
1. Remember if you speak Chinese during this time:
a. It disturbs those who are trying to think in English.
b. It appears rude to the American instructor
2. Interrupting or helping when another person is answering a question is not done in an American classroom.
Each person gets to give an individual answer.
3. You can feel free to respond when asked for help, suggestion or ideas.

Lecture Questions
Please write: 3 questions about the lecture
3 words were most important
3 words or phrases which you did not understand clearly

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TEACHING
AGENDA

People and Relationships

LESSON 1

Daily AGENDA
ANNOUNCEMENTS (Write class announcements each day on the same place on the board.)
GOOD: Arrive at class early enough to write the day’s Agenda (opening activities, announcements, etc.) on the board before
students arrive. Note: They may be there earlier than you expect -- 20-30 minutes prior to class. You do not want to be
writing with your back to the students, nor do you want to miss speaking to them as they arrive for the first day of class.
EASIER: Prepare the day’s Agenda on poster or paper the night before. TAKE MASKING or BLUE PAINTER’S TAPE.

Use the following activities any time during the Lesson.

JOURNAL ASSIGNMENT (Write the following on board.)
Write a journal entry (1/2 to 1 page length) in response to today’s Proverb. Date your journal entry each
day. Each Friday turn in one entry from that week’s journal writings.
(Respond to student’s writing by dialogue journaling before returning it to student.)

EMOTIONS GRAPHICS See Resource Page 11. Choose 4 –5 each day. Copy each one on a half sheet of paper. Fold the label so that the
students cannot see the word. Tell a story about these emotions. Let students guess which picture best fitsthe emotion . Post on wall.

GREETING Begin class by modeling that morning’s greeting. Students repeat Teacher’s greeting. Write greeting on board or poster
T Hello. I’m glad to meet you. My name is (Teacher’s name.) Please call me __________.
S My name is (Student’s name), Please call me_____________________..
ROLL CALL Teacher calls each student’s name. Student raises hand and answers:

“Present”

PROVERB “A good name is more to be treasured than great riches.” –King Solomon
TONGUE TWISTER Teacher explains that today’s Twister offers practice in making the sh sound—noting different
spellings: ch, tion, sion, and sh. Students listen as teacher models. Whole class practices with teacher several
times. Then pair practice. Culminate with individual volunteers. Then practice “n” (as in name not lame.)
The chef from Chicago loves his nation; he lives on a pension and shouts at the shore.
Aluminum, linoleum, aluminum, linoleum,
Nicholas Novinksy named his nine nieces and nephews: Nora, Nell, Ned, Nina, Nate, Nancy, Nan, Nick, & Nathan
WORD GAME

STAND
I

(I understand.)

This is a guessing game which teaches
idiomatic expression and culture lessons.

IDIOM (SUGGESTION: Make brief comments on the meaning of IDIOM. Bring a paper bag with a picture of a cat in it. Explain
the use of this American idiom with several examples. Ask if there is a similar idiom in China.)
(To tell someone something you should not.)

“Let the cat out of the bag.”
“His name is mud.”
PRONUNCIATION WARM-UP

SMILE – PUCKER Enunciation Practice

Since this is the first day of class, explain to the class that there are several activities, which they will do each day to help improve their pronunciation of
English. PRONUNCIATION WARM-UPs and PRONUNCIATION ADVICE focus on self-help.
Smile Stretch your mouth and cheek muscles in a wide smile so that your teeth show. Say, Learning a language is like
learning a new sport. It takes many new muscles.
Say “eeeeeeeeeeee.”
Pucker:
Then with exaggeration, protrude your lips saying, ooooooooooo (rhymes with “boo”).
Repeat in quick succession “eeeeeeeeeeeee, oooooooooooo” 10 X.
Practice:
1 sheeeeeeeeeeee
1 geeeeeeeeeeee
1 beeeeeeeeeee
2 shoooooooooooo
2 goooooooooooo
2 booooooooooo
Variation: Change the initial consonant and continue “smile and pucker” practice.

PRONUNCIATION ADVICE Ask students to bring a small mirror or old cd to practice these exercises in class.
Encourage students to continue pronunciation “work-outs” every day at home with a mirror.

TEACHING LESSON 1 using the Summer Student Workbook
FIRST DAY ACTIVITIES —– See Teacher Guide Resources
SINGING “Getting to Know You,” “Nothing Could Be Finer,” and “Every Day in China” See Page 10.
FAREWELL T

“Goodbye! It’s been good getting to know you.
Ss “Goodbye! Me too. ”

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TEACHING

People and Relationships

LESSON 1

TEACHING the Summer Student Workbook
Vocabulary
1. woman/women
2. man/men
3. husband(s)
4. wife/wives
5. baby/babies
6. parent(s)
7. children/child
8. boy(s)

9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.

girl(s)
grandparent(s)
son(s)
daughter(s)
picture, photo, photograph,
friend(s)
Who's that? Who's this?
wedding picture

17. worried
18. scared
19. happy
20. sad
21. surprised

Vocabulary Drilling Using the textbook, have the students repeat the vocabulary in single
words and then in sentences. e.g. "This is a..." “Who is this?" "Who is that?"
Dictation Give a dictation of the words or phrases practiced.
Practicing Possessive Pronouns (my, his, her, their, our) Looking at the pictures in the text
have the students repeat sentences like:
"This is my wife." "This is my husband." "This is my wedding picture."
"This is our son." "This is our daughter." "These are our children." "This is our baby."
"This is our child." "These are our children." "These are our grandparents."
Practice the Above in Pairs answering the question: "Who is this?""
Teacher Shows Pictures of His/Her Family using the vocabulary:
"This is my...."
"These are my…”
Review students on the vocabulary covered. Have individuals in the class repeat the
sentences. Correct pronunciation. Give feedback.
Note: After first 20 minutes the teacher should have heard every student speak and should have a rough idea of
students' pronunciation. Teacher should work to include all students in the drilling and practice of
vocabulary and should hear individuals speak also.
Greetings
Hi! How are you?
Fine. And you?

Making Introductions
I'd like to introduce you to my husband,
Michael.
Nice to meet you.
Good to meet you.
Hello, I'd like you to meet my_______.
(Substitute new vocabulary)
I'm glad to meet you.
Glad to meet you, too.
Hi! This is my_____________ .
Nice to meet you.
Nice to meet you, too.
Hello Susan! This is my father, Frank Taylor.
It's nice to meet you, Mr. Taylor.
And you, Susan.

Hello. My name is (Ann).
Hi. I'm (Bill).
Nice to meet you.
Nice meeting you, too.
What’s your name?
Hi! My name’s_______?
What’s your name?
Hello! I'm___________.
It’s good to meet you.
Great to meet you, too.

Practice On Your Own
Introduce yourself to three people. Use the models above and your own name. Introduce one class
member to another or to the teacher.
Pronouns
1. With a partner practice using the personal pronouns on the next page. For example:
I/Me
I would like to tell you some things about me.
My/Mine
This is my Summer Student Workbook. It is mine.
2. Review all forms of pronouns on page 4.
3. Using objects in the classroom, practice using the demonstrative pronouns .
This is a desk. That is a window.

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TEACHING

People and Relationships

LESSON 1

Theirs
Their Theirs

4

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TEACHING

People and Relationships

LESSON 1

PRONOUN CHART
PERSONAL PRONOUNS
I, me
he, him
it
they, them
you
he, her
we, us
____________________________________________________________________
POSSESSIVE PRONOUNS
my, mine
his
its
their, theirs
your, yours
her, hers
our, ours
_____________________________________________________________________
REFLEXIVE AND INTENSIVE PRONOUNS
myself
himself
ourselves
itself
yourself
herself
yourselves
_____________________________________________________________________
RELATIVE PRONOUNS
who
which
whose
whom
that
_____________________________________________________________________
INTERROGATIVE PRONOUNS
who
which
whose
whom
what
_____________________________________________________________________
MOST COMMONLY USED INDEFINITE PRONOUNS
all
each
most
other
another
either
neither
several
any
everybody
nobody
some
anybody
everyone
none
somebody
anyone
few
no one
someone
both
many
one
such
______________________________________________________________________________________________________

DEMONSTRATIVE PRONOUNS
this, that these, those

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TEACHING

1.

3.

People and Relationships

Harry, This is Mary
(A) Harry, this is Mary.
(B) Hi.
(C) Hello.
(A) Harry, this is Mary.
(B) How do you do?
(C) How do you do?
(A) Harry, I'd like you to meet my sister Mary.
(B) How do you do, Mary.
(C) Thank you, I'm glad to meet you.

What's Your Name? Where are You From?
What's your name?
Where are you from?
What's your name?
Where are you from?
What's your name?
Where are you from?
How long have you been here?
How long have you been here?
How long have you been here?
What's your name? Where are you from?
How long have you been here?

LESSON 1

Jazz Chants
2. Nice to Meet You
Nice to meet you.
Nice to meet you.
Nice to meet you.
Nice to meet you.
Nice to meet you.
I’m so glad to meet you.
Thank you, I’m glad to meet you.
I'm very glad to meet you.
4. I’m Glad to Meet You.
I'm glad to meet you.
I've heard so much about you.
I'm glad to meet you.
I've heard so much about you.
I'm glad to meet you.
Thank you, I'm glad to meet you.
I've heard so many nice things about you.
I've heard so many nice things about you.
So many nice things.
I've heard so many nice things about you.
I'm glad to meet you.
Thank you, I'm glad to meet you.

Discussion of Names
Ask each student his/her name in large letters on a sheet of paper. They may write their names in their native language on
one side, and in English on the other. Break in to small groups and discuss the following: Write the questions on a chart:
 What is your full name?
 How do you write it in your native language?
 Do you have a nickname?
 What does your name mean?
 Who gave this name to you?
 Do you like your name? Why or why not?
 Has your name ever caused you any problems?
 What happens to your name when you get married?
 Have you ever thought about changing your name? If so, what would you change it to?
 How would you decide what to name your children?

Model a presentation for the class of your name using answers to the questions . Ask students to speak for 2
minutes each about their name, using the paper they made earlier as a visual aid.
Sentence Completion
Vocabulary for Sentences: (There are more words than blanks in the following activities. Make the best choice and write it in
the blank.) wife, grandparents, student, Chongqing, twin, siblings, four, parents, Guangzhou

1. I am a ___________. My name is_________________ .2.I live with my__________________.
3. I have _____brothers. I have ________sisters. 4. My grandfather and my grandmother live in _______.
5. My uncle and aunt live in _________________. 6. A husband and _________ are married.
7. On Monday both of my ____________ went to work.
Emotions
worried, surprised, scared, threatened, disappointed, upset, angry
1.Tom was __________ _when he saw his score on the examination.
2. Betty will be_______ if we are late. 3. The dark shadow made Jim feel ________
4. What makes you feel sad? I feel sad when

5. What makes you feel surprised? I feel surprised when _____
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TEACHING

People and Relationships

LESSON 1

A Legacy of Love
As a young man, Al was a skilled artist, a potter. He had a wife and two fine sons. One night, his oldest
son developed a sickness. Thinking it was only some common problem, neither Al nor his wife took the condition
very seriously. But the sickness was actually acute, and the boy died suddenly that night.
Knowing the death could have been prevented if he had only realized the seriousness of the situation,
Al's emotional health deteriorated under the enormous burden of his guilt. To make matters worse his wife left
him a short time later, leaving him alone with his six-year-old younger son. The hurt and pain of the two
situations were more than Al could handle, and he turned to alcohol to help him cope. In time Al became an
alcoholic.
As the alcoholism progressed, Al began to lose everything he possessed - his home, his land, his art
objects, everything. Eventually Al died alone in a San Francisco motel room.
When I heard of Al's death, I reacted with the same disdain the world shows for one who ends his life
with nothing material to show for it. "What a complete failure!" I thought "What a totally wasted life!" As time went
by, I began to re-evaluate my earlier harsh judgment You see, I knew. Al's now adult son, Ernie. He is one of the
kindest, most caring, most loving men I have ever known. I watched Ernie with his children and saw the free flow
of love between them. I knew that kindness and caring had to come from somewhere.
I hadn't heard Ernie talk much about his father. It is so hard to defend an alcoholic. One day I worked up
my courage to ask him. "I'm really puzzled by something," I said, "I know your father was basically the only one
to raise you. What on earth did he do that you became such a special person?"
Ernie sat quietly and reflected for a few moments. Then he said, "From my earliest memories as a child
until I left home at 18, Al came into my room every night, gave me a kiss and said, 'I love you, son."' Tears came
to my eyes as I realized what a fool I had been to judge Al as a failure. He had not left any material possessions
behind. But he had been a kind loving father, and he left behind one of the finest, most giving men I have every
known.

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TEACHING
LEARNING ACTIVITIES

People and Relationships

LESSON 1

LEARNING ACTIVITIES
Discussion
1. Make a list of questions you'd like to ask each of your students if you had the time. For example:
"How long have you studied English?
Do you like studying English?
How many hours of homework do you have each night?
Have you ever been to the United States?
How many brothers and sisters do you have?"
You need as many questions as you have students in your class.
2. Ask the students to take out a piece of paper and write numbers like this:
1
2
They write as many numbers as there are people in the class, plus you.
3. (Prepare Post-its or small pieces of paper with numbers.) Give each student a numbered paper
and have them tape or stick them to their shirts.
4. Tell student 1, "This is your question: How long have you studied English?" Tell the student to
write that question at the top of his/her paper. (You may need to write the sentence on the board for
the student to copy.)
Then tell student 2, "This is your question: Do you like studying English?" Student 2 writes that
question on his/her paper. Continue until each student has written a question on his/her paper.
5. Now students walk around the room asking only their question. They write students' answers
next to the corresponding numbers on the paper. (This keeps track of who they've asked and who
they haven't.)
The teacher has this question to ask the students —– What is your name?
This gives the teacher time to get started on memorizing students' names.
6. Students then report on what they learned about their classmates.
OR
Ask students to imagine that they have brought 4 of their favorite photos from home which
represent events, people or places that are important to them for whatever reason. Students can
then decide for themselves which information they want to relay to the rest of the class. The
audience then has an opportunity to practice their questioning skills to find out more.
in You'll find you learn a great deal about who your students are and what is important to them in, a
very short time

Make a poster with common small talk questions on it. Things like "How was work today?"
or "Did you have a good day at school?".
At the start of a break time point at the poster and then leave the room for 5 minutes. Stay in the
doorway to listen. After a period of not really knowing what to do the students start to have really good
conversations. Give them time to get used to the idea and then tell them that they had to do this before
class begins.

Emotions Survey Write on the board. Students make copies and fill in the blanks with the whole
class, groups or pairs.
_____________is happy today because_________
_____________is annoyed today because_______
_____________is disappointed today because____

_______is nervous today because ______
_______is worried today because_______
_______is unhappy today because ______
_______is proud today because_________

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TEACHING
LEARNING ACTIVITIES

People and Relationships

LESSON 1

FIRST DAY SPECIAL ACTIVITIES
First Day’s Welcome “ Welcome to the Chengdu/American Summer English Program. Welcome to this
class. This class is (give class level and number, i.e., A-3). This is my (1st, 2nd, etc.) year teaching in
this program. At home in America, I (tell your occupation). I have looked forward to meeting each of
you for many months. Three goals for our class are: (Write these on the board or poster .)
1. Improve spoken English and listening skills.
2. Learn about American culture.
3. Make new friends.”
Keep comments brief. Students are not yet used to hearing you speak and may have difficulty if you
say too much at first.
Identification Cards Look in the preface (page ix) for suggestion on using index cards for getting
student information.

Getting-to- Know -You- Games For First Days — or, do one a week for first three weeks
(Students have copies in their Student Workbook)
The Name Art (Grid) Game: You will need: The Name Art page in the SSW, colors, a 12”x18 poster,
and a roll of 2” masking tape.) Each student will need a different color (markers, crayons, or map
pencils) for each letter in his name. Double letters are each colored a different color. (For example:
Peggy is made up of 5 letters. Choose 5 different colors . Each of the double letters i.e. “gg” will have a
different color—, P–pink, e-blue, g- yellow, g-green, y-purple).
The purpose of the NAME GAME is to help students realize their uniqueness and special value as a
person (to the class, and to you as your student) and to discover this special uniqueness through his
own name as it forms a distinctly different pattern on the grid, unlike anyone else’s in the class.
The culmination of the game is to display of all the students’ names on the classroom wall, arranged
in a square or rectangle around a blank center poster paper. It will look like a quilt.
Print this title on the center poster sheet “THESE ARE A FEW OF MY FAVORITE THINGS”. Ask
students to write a few of his/her favorite things’ and sign their names on the poster. (They may add items
all summer.)

Autograph Party (This is a good get-acquainted game and oral communication practice. Give directions
for the game: Explain that students are to take a pen and the Autograph Party sheet, get up and walk
around the room, ask (only in English!) fellow students questions on the game sheet (one question per
student). Have them write the student’s answer to the question on their game sheet. The purpose of
this game is to practice communicating in English and get to know something about their fellow
classmates. At a reasonable time, have students share some of the interesting facts they have learned
about each other.
Go and Find Out Who Use any of these get acquainted games during the first few mornings or
afternoons.
Human Bingo Game Human Bingo is a great ice breaker. Often, students have not met each other.
Give small prizes for students as they shout “Bingo!” –Hershey’s kisses, etc.—and for “coverall,” a slightly larger prize – such a miniature stuffed toy from McDonald’s.)
The Purpose Help students get acquainted by speaking to each other in English.
Rules Tell students to move quickly about the room, asking a person one question on the BINGO
game sheet. If he/she answers “YES,” then get that person’s autograph in the appropriate square. If
the answer is “NO,” go quickly to another person until you get a “YES.” A person may sign your card
only once.
The Object of the Game is to fill any line (horizontally, vertically, or diagonally) with autographs, and
shout, “BINGO!” The game continues until someone completes all the squares with autographs and
shouts, “COVER-ALL.” That person is declared the WINNER! (Pin a #1 or blue ribbon on the champ
and give him/her a prize!)
An Everyday Survival Kit Many teachers like to give their students this survival kit on the first day of the
term. Others give the kit as a parting gift at the end of the summer term.
You will need enough copies of the handout sheet and enough items for a kit for each student. (35-40
students.) See Resources.
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TEACHING
LEARNING ACTIVITIES

People and Relationships

LESSON 1

LEARNING ACTIVITY RESOURCES
Memorize a Poem Post this poem on the first day of class. Encourage students to memorize it. To get
phrasing, inflection, pausing, have students listen to you read it aloud first, phrase by phrase. Then read it
phrase by phrase with students repeating after you.
Example:
A BAG OF TOOLS
A Poem by R. L. Sharpe

1. T reads poem; Ss listen.
2. T reads phrase; Ss repeat.
3. Volunteer S read.

Isn’t it strange that
Princes and kings,/
And clowns that caper
In sawdust rings,/
And common folk
Like you and me
Are builders of eternity?

Note: Pause at phrase marks (/).
To each is given
A bag of tools,/
A shapeless mass,/
And a book of rules;/
And each must make-Ere life has flown--/
A stumbling block
Or a stepping stone.
SONGS
Every Day in China

The More We Get Together

Every day in China is sweeter than the day before.
Every day in China I love her more and more.
Striving hard to serve her, helping her to bless the world.
Every day in China is sweeter than the day before.
Getting to Know You
Getting to know you, getting to know all about you.
Getting to like you, getting to hope you like me.
Getting to know you, putting it my way, but nicely,
You are precisely my cup of tea.
Getting to know you, getting to feel free and easy,
When I am with you, getting to know what to say.
Haven’t you noticed, suddenly I’m bright and breezy,
Because of all the beautiful and new
Things I’m learning about you, day by day.

The more we get together,
Together, together,
The more we get together
the happier we’ll be.
For your friends are my friends,
And my friends are your friends.
The more we get together
the happier we’ll be.

Nothing Could Be Finer
Verse 1:
Nothing could be finer than to be in Chengdu, China, in the morning.
Nothing could be finer than to be in Chengdu, China, in the morning.
Refrain:
If I had Aladdin’s lamp for only 1 day,
I’d make a wish, and here’s what I’d say: (Repeat verse 1.)

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